Through thematic lectures and field work, students on the SIT: Nepal Development and Social Change program explore how international development, political conflict, an emerging civil society, and global markets are all working to redefine Nepal in the twenty-first century. Students take two extended excursions to better understand development and social change from different perspectives: the first to either Terai or the middle hills region, and an extended excursion and homestay in the Himalayas.

“The program staff are all beautiful-hearted people. Because the program has been there for 40 years they have access to some pretty cool connections. The three language teachers are truly excellent--I have never had better. These language teachers have a dynamic style and will likely succeed at getting you to a medium language proficiency no matter who you are.” - Jack B. '17

Fields of study:

Nepali Language and Interdisciplinary studies related to Nepal

Eligibility:

Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.8 (Whitman requirement); ability to live in a culture very different from one’s own and to adjust to the living conditions of the developing world

Language Prerequisite:

None

Credits:

16 credits per semester - Required Courses:
Development and Social Change Seminar (3 credits)
Nepali Language (6 credits)
Field Methods and Ethics (3 credits)
Independent Study Project (ISP) (4 credits)

Credit Conversion:

1 SIT credit = 1 Whitman credit

Internships:

None

Housing:

Six-week homestay in Kathmandu and a short village homestay during the Himalayan excursion.  Other accommodations during the program include guest houses or small hotels.

Meals:

All meals for the entire program period are covered either by SIT directly, or through a stipend provided to each student, or through the homestay.

Semesters Offered:

Fall, Spring

Calendar:

late August – December, late January – May

Deadline:

Rolling Admission – students are encouraged to apply early.

Scholarships:

SIT Study Abroad Scholarships

Program Link:

SIT: Nepal Development and Social Change