2017 | 2016 | 2015

September 2017

  • Melissa Clearfield, Professor of Psychology, received a second sub-award from Harvard University’s Center for the Developing Child to fund her ongoing “Play for Success” intervention study designed to increase executive function (e.g., attention, object exploration, and problem-solving) in low-income children. This sub-award was funded by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Donor Advised Fund through the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, and the study is a collaboration with Children’s Home Society of Washington. The grant enabled Professor Clearfield and two Whitman students to spend the summer collecting and analyzing data from families in Walla Walla and Seattle. According to Professor Clearfield, the data thus far look promising, as the intervention appears to be effective at improving executive function in the infants tested, and Professor Clearfield looks forward to continuing her collaboration with Harvard in the future.

August 2017

  • Mark Beck, Benjamin H. Brown Professor of Physics, Arielle Cooley, Assistant Professor of Biology, Moira Gresham, Associate Professor of Physics, and Greg Vaughn-Ogin, Assistant Professor of Physics, all received research grants from the National Science Foundation this summer.

    Professor Beck’s project will develop new ways of uncovering errors that occur in quantum systems, advancing our understanding of quantum mechanics and helping to influence the development of modern technology.

    Professor Cooley’s grant will allow her to continue her research into the genetic mechanisms underlying repeated evolution using the monkeyflower genus Mimulus as a model organism.

    Professor Gresham will use her grant to investigate the nature of dark matter, advancing our understanding of fundamental physical laws and the evolution of the cosmos.

    Professor Vaughn-Ogin’s award is part of a multi-institutional grant to the LIGO Scientific Collaboration Center for Coatings Research, and will address the problem of thermal noise in the interferometer mirrors of LIGO’s gravitational wave detectors.

    These research projects enable several undergraduate students to conduct summer research with their faculty mentors, exposing them to sophisticated scientific research techniques and providing excellent preparation for graduate school or future careers in science. In addition, these grants provide opportunities to broaden the reach of these scientific projects through mentoring and outreach to college and K-12 students who may be underrepresented in science.

May 2017

  • Whitman College has received a one-year, $11,900 grant from the Council of Independent Colleges to support a new community service program called, “Men Making Meals.” With the grant, Whitman’s Student Engagement Center will partner with the Walla Walla Senior Center and the United Way to provide cooking classes and companionship to older adults. The CIC’s Intergenerational Connections grant program, which is supported by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), is designed to enhance connections between college students and older adults. “Men Making Meals” will assist seniors—often men—who may not have learned to cook due to the gender roles of their generation, but whose wives have now passed away or become unable to cook. By teaching the seniors basic cooking skills, student interns will help alleviate concerns related to poor nutrition and significant expense associated with prepared or take-out meals, as well as encourage fellowship and reduce isolation for seniors. For students, the program will provide an opportunity to form positive intergenerational connections and break down some of the stereotypes young people sometimes have about older adults. The “Men Making Meals” program will support eight Whitman student interns during the 2017-2018 academic year.

April 2017

  • Nate Boland, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and Greg Ogin, Assistant Professor of Physics, received research grants from the Murdock Trust College Research Program for Natural Sciences. 

    Professor Boland’s research in environmental chemistry focuses on nutrient and toxic metal bioavailability and mobility in the environment. With this grant, he will investigate the mechanisms of metal ion mobilization and acquisition exploited by plants, microbes and fungi to satisfy their nutritional needs. His grant will support six students over the course of three years.  

    Professor Ogin studies optics and precision measurement; he is part of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, a group that is studying precision measurement for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. His grant will support his efforts to develop ways to better measure the thermo-optic properties of thin film materials used in precision high-reflective mirror coatings. This will further our understanding of these materials and the noise sources associated with them, leading to better precision measurements within the gravitational-wave detection field and elsewhere in the wider optics community. Professor Ogin’s grant will enable three students to participate in this work over three years.

October 2016

  • Britney Moss, Assistant Professor of Biology and Biochemistry, Biophysics, & Molecular Biology, is part of a collaborative research team that recently received a $3.6 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation’s Plant Genome Research Program. In addition to Whitman College, the team consists of researchers at the University of Missouri, Rutgers University, and the University of Washington. The researchers will study how the plant hormone auxin controls ear and tassel growth in corn. They will use a combination of genomic, synthetic biology, and bioinformatic approaches to identify the specific combinations of genes expressed in these tissues in response to the hormone. In addition to shedding light on how auxin functions in plants, the research may also provide a way for growers to breed high-yielding varieties of crop plants. The grant will provide opportunities for Whitman students to conduct research with Prof. Moss and her collaborators, travel to present their work at national scientific meetings, and help develop scientific outreach activities.

June 2016

  • Whitman College has received a grant of $4,000 from the Pacific Power Foundation to support its Advanced Studies Enrichment (ASE) program, which provides free tutoring to high school AP math and science students. The ASE program partners Whitman College student tutors with high school students. Tutoring sessions are held in Whitman’s Hall of Science, providing a stimulating study space and exposing high school students to an inspiring college environment while they study. Sessions are designed to give students uninterrupted time to focus on their work, with tutors available to provide help when they get stuck on a topic, as well as to provide general mentoring and interaction. The ASE program, which has been supported by the Pacific Power Foundation since its inception, is one of the most successful examples of Whitman’s partnership with local schools and is a signature program within Whitman’s community outreach efforts.

May 2016

  • Nick Bader, Assistant Professor of Geology, received a research grant through the Murdock College Research Program for Natural Sciences. The grant will support his work in past soils, specifically his project to assemble a record of Quaternary paleoclimate from the Palouse loess in Southeastern Washington. In addition to supporting six research students over three years, the grant will enable the purchase of a piece of equipment (magnetic susceptibility meter) that is necessary to facilitate the research.
  • Arielle Cooley has earned a two-year renewal grant from the Murdock College Research Program for Life Sciences to extend her previously-funded Murdock research investigating the genetic mechanisms underlying repeated evolution using Mimulus (monkeyflower) as a model system. In addition, she earned a travel award from the NSF-funded microMORPH project at Harvard that will allow her to travel to the University of Connecticut next year to develop transgenic techniques in Mimulus in collaboration with a colleague at that institution.
  • Whitman College earned a $1,000 seminar grant from the AAC&U Bringing Theory to Practice program. Principal Investigator Kazi Joshua, Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion, developed the seminar to engage in productive dialog those faculty and staff who work with first-generation students, in order to enhance communication, coordinate activities, and develop a cohesive set of initiatives that promote the well-being of these students. The seminar was held on May 25.

February 2016

  • Nicole Pietrantoni, Assistant Professor of Studio Art, received the Graves Award in the Humanities, a competitive grant available to early-career faculty from liberal arts colleges in Washington, Oregon, and California who demonstrate outstanding teaching and scholarly work and who are nominated by their College’s President. The grant will facilitate a new body of artwork that explores humans’ complex relationship to nature and enables the development of Whitman College’s first Environmental Studies-Art course titled “Art in the Anthropocene.” With this funding, Pietrantoni will conduct archival research at the Center for Art and the Environment at the Nevada Art Museum, travel to historic land art sites in the American West, and participate in “The Practice of Art in the Anthropocene” conference at the University of California-Los Angeles during her sabbatical in Spring 2017.
  • Arielle Cooley, Assistant Professor of Biology, received an American Philosophical Society Franklin Research grant to support her ongoing research on the monkeyflower genus Mimulus. This grant will support the purchase of supplies for experiments that will help determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolution of flower color diversity in Mimulus.

October 2015

  • Tim Parker, Associate Professor of Biology, received conference grants from the National Science Foundation and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation to organize an international workshop called “Improving Inference in Evolutionary Biology and Ecology” in November 2015 at the Center for Open Science in Charlottesville, VA. This workshop grew out of Parker's research and his ongoing interests in teaching biology students to critically evaluate the scope of scientific inferences. The goal of the workshop is to develop and promote the adoption of incentive structures, especially editorial policies for academic journals, that will reduce the rate of publication of false positives, promote replication of research, and facilitate synthesis of results across studies. The attendees will include scientists interested in improving scientific inference along with editors-in-chief of many prominent journals in evolutionary biology and ecology. By changing institutions in ways that should reduce publication bias and promote more rigorous evaluation of hypotheses, the organizers hope to improve empirical progress in these fields.

September 2015

  • Doug Juers, Associate Professor of Physics, was awarded a grant of $316,455 from the National Institutes of Health for his research on the thermal behavior macromolecular crystals. His project will improve the quality of three-dimensional structures of macromolecules, structures that are key for understanding the molecular basis of disease. His grant will provide research opportunities for several students over three years.
  • Marion Götz, Associate Professor of Chemistry, was awarded a grant of $260,647 from the National Institutes of Health for her research on proteasome inhibitors. Her project investigates the development of a new and improved class of proteasome inhibitors that may lead to more effective therapeutic agents for cancer. Her grant will provide research opportunities for 9 students over three years.
  • Tim Machonkin, Associate Professor of Chemistry, was awarded a grant of $385,400 from the National Science Foundation. His research examines the mechanisms of a specific class of bacterial enzymes that can be used for bioremediation or other applications. This work, which involves a collaboration with Yale University, will provide research opportunities for 8-12 Whitman students, and send some of them to spend the summer doing research at Yale.

August 2015

  • Alissa Cordner, Assistant Professor of Sociology, is the co-principle investigator with collaborators at Northeastern University on a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation entitled "Perfluorinated Chemicals: The Social Discovery of a Class of Emerging Contaminants." The goals of the research are to track the social and scientific discovery of perfluorinated chemicals, hazardous chemicals that are widely used in industrial production. This project will investigate the emergence of lay awareness, scientific research, government involvement, media coverage, litigation, and advocacy around this class of chemicals. Cordner will analyze regulatory documents and public testimony about voluntary and regulatory action related to perfluorinated chemicals and will conduct interviews with affiliated individuals. The project will lead to a better understanding of chemical risks and environmental health controversies and will contribute to research on alternatives assessment, chemical substitution, and environmental regulation.
  • Melissa Clearfield, Professor of Psychology, was awarded a grant sub-award from the Hemera Foundation. She and Whitman College are part of a larger grant to Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child to launch innovative research focusing on at-risk children from prenatal to three years of age and their caregivers. At Whitman, Clearfield and students in her Whitman Infant Learning and Development (WILD) lab created a simple Play for Success intervention for low-income infants to boost object exploration and, eventually, executive function. They will partner with the Children’s Home Society of Washington to test this intervention through the Early Head Start program. This intervention will eventually lead to better problem-solving skills in this at-risk population.

May 2015

  • Whitman College received a planning grant of $90,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support its efforts to foster practices of diversity, inclusion, and equity on campus. The planning grant builds upon work the College has done over the past three years, including creating a diversity council and hiring a Chief Diversity Officer. Funding from the planning grant will enable the College to bring together members of the Whitman community for a series of focused discussions with faculty, staff, and students. In addition, the college will bring in external facilitators (University of Michigan Program on Intergroup Dialogue) and a nationally-known consultant (Dr. Damon Williams) to provide training and guidance to campus groups. These efforts will lead to the creation of a set of implementation strategies that will ultimately contribute to the development of Whitman College’s strategic plan for diversity.