Etched in Stone

 

Pogue's "City of Rocks" appeals to broad audience

As a Whitman geology professor and avid climber, Kevin Pogue’s enthusiasm for the City of Rocks in Idaho is evident both in and out of the classroom. His new book, “Etched in Stone: The Geology of City of Rocks National Reserve and Castle Rocks State Park, Idaho,” is the first of its kind to explore the geology of the area in a format that is both accessible and appealing to visitors, park naturalists and geologists alike.

Published this year by the Idaho Geological Survey, the book provides a detailed overview of the geological evolution and history of the City of Rocks National Reserve and the adjacent Castle Rock State Park, as well as a glossary of terms and photographs of geologic structures. 

Where the Great River BendsWallula Gap a treasure revealed in Carson book

It’s magical enough just seeing the Columbia River while driving on Highway 12 toward the Tri-Cities.

But then, as the driver glances left, thinking she’ll see only broad waters, she sees much more — 800-foot and 1,000-foot-high basalt cliffs and the yawning opening between these rock “gates” where the Columbia and Snake rivers flow through. This is Wallula Gap, an overwhelming sight on such a scale that a comparatively small motorist in her ant of a car is instantly reminded of just how majestic is the world.  More...

Macbeth for MurderersBehind closed doors: Shakespeare reaches inmates' hearts

In “Macbeth for Murderers,” Roberta Davidson, associate professor of English, chronicles her time behind the walls of the Washington State Penitentiary teaching Shakespeare’s plays to convicted murderers. It includes interviews with the inmate students and tells of Davidson’s experiences in the classroom, her experiences with a prison stalker and her time spent inside the prison during an inmate riot.  More...

Eating Well, Reading WellFrench professor explores writings of author Maryse Condé

A new book by Nicole Simek, assistant professor of foreign languages and literatures (French) and general studies, looks closely at the writings of Guadeloupean author Maryse Condé, whose historical fiction probes everything from gender to colonialism to stereotypical images of literary characters.

Simek’s book, aptly titled “Eating Well, Reading Well: Maryse Condé and the Ethics of Interpretation,” examines Condé’s work as sharply as Condé herself “challenges the reader with the problematic, yet pragmatic, need to read well.”  More...

Friendly FireKatrina Roberts' new work, "Friendly Fire," in print

“Friendly Fire,” Katrina Roberts’ third book of verse and winner of the Idaho Prize for Poetry in 2007, was published in February 2008.

The publisher notes, “These poems consider how both nurture and nature inform violent behaviors; how we must choose to see beauty in decay; how prayer has power even if we don’t know whom we’re addressing. Informed by the possibilities of the “American” sonnet, this sequence confronts inherent dangers in even the best-intended human gestures, and explores how we sustain faith in the face of such damage.” More...