February 23, 2015

Faculty News Briefs

Professor of Film and Media Studies Robert Sickels' documentary film Seven Ways from Sunday was presented with the Best Documentary Short award at this year's Thin Line Film Fest. Sickels made the film with Josh Karp '05 and Evan Martin '15.

Associate Professor of Biology Kate Jackson is part of a team of researchers who recently described a new species of house snake from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The research paper, titled "A phylogeny of Central African Boaedon (Serpentes: Lamprophiidae), with the description of a new cryptic species from the Albertine Rift," was published in African Journal of Zoology.


Campus Events

Exhibitions: The Hand and The Machine

The Hand and The Machine is part of a year-long series of collaborative events by the Sheehan Gallery and Whitman's departments of studio art and art history/visual culture. The series is bringing around seven visiting artists to campus to lecture, provide workshops and exhibit their works in a variety of spaces in 2014 and 2015 thanks to a grant from the McMillen Foundation. The studio art department believes that technology isn't an end in and of itself, but rather one piece of a larger dialogue about how art is made today and how new tools and technologies are changing the world's perspective, on the whole, on how art can be made. Given this, programming and exhibitions for The Hand and The Machine endeavor to go beyond facile dichotomies and instead celebrate interdisciplinary approaches to art-making, finding a way to put these two distinct but potentially complementary modes into dialogue. The artists to be displayed in the Sheehan segment of The Hand and The Machine - Lari Gibbons, Peter Christian-Johnson, Greg Pond and Paul Cantanese - are practitioners whose creative productions embody this across a wide array of studio practices, including sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, new media and installation.

Feb. 23 at noon through April 15. Olin Hall, Sheehan Gallery

Lecture: Canada and the Arctic

Retired U.S. Coast Guard Rear Admiral Jeffrey Garrett is the former commanding officer of two polar icebreakers and an Arctic and Antarctic ice pilot. He has testified before Congress about issues facing the United States with respect to the Arctic, served on National Academy of Sciences study committees and consulted on a wide variety of polar issues.

Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. Olin Hall, Olin 130

Lecture: Movies and Math - The Past, the Present and the Future

What's your favorite recent movie? Frozen? The Avengers? Avatar? Transformers? What do these and all the highest earning Hollywood movies since 2000 have in common? Mathematics! In this presentation, Professor Michael Dorff will discuss how math is being used to create better and more realistic movies. Along the way we will discuss some specific movies and the mathematics behind them, including how Frozen uses math to create realistic looking snow and how The Incredibles uses math to make an animated character move faster. Dorff is a professor of mathematics at Brigham Young University in Utah. He received his Ph.D. in complex analysis from the University of Kentucky in 1997 and is the founder and director of the $2.6 million NSF-funded Center for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics (CURM). Dorff started and runs the BYU "Careers in Math" speaker series and the BYU summer eight-week mathematics REU, both funded by NSF grants. He has received several university and national teaching awards including a Mathematical Association of America's Haimo Teaching Award, the top U.S. award for teaching undergraduate mathematics, and BYU's top teaching award, the Maeser Excellence in Teaching Award, both in 2010. In 2012, he was honored with BYU's Egbert Teaching and Learning Fellowship and was named a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

Feb. 24 at 4 p.m. Olin Hall, Olin 245

Film Screening: Pretty Faces

Pretty Faces is an all-female ski film featuring the best athletes from around the world. Inspired by the desire to offer young girls role models and inspiration to play outside, this film celebrates playing outside, pushing the sport of skiing and living up to our fullest potential as a supportive community. Sponsored by WEB.

Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. Olin Hall, Olin 130

Music 360°: Samuel Jones Masterclass

The Department of Music presents a masterclass with composer Samuel Jones, featuring Whitman student performers. This masterclass is in conjunction with the Music 360°: Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones festival presented by the Walla Walla Symphony and Whitman College, and is free of charge and open to the public.

Feb. 25 at 4 p.m. Hall of Music, Chism Recital Hall

Panel: Why Economic Diversity Matters in Higher Education

Whitman professors Julie Charlip and Allison Calhoun will join students from Walla Walla Community College and Walla Walla High School to discuss first generation student experiences in higher education. The panelists will discuss why economic diversity matters in education. The event is co-sponsored by Students for Education Reform and First Generation Working Class.

Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. Hunter Conservatory, Kimball Theatre

Music 360°: Samuel Jones Festival, Chamber Singers and Orchestra Open Rehearsal

The Department of Music presents an open rehearsal of the Whitman College Chamber Singers and Orchestra as part of the Music 360°: Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones festival presented by the Walla Walla Symphony and Whitman College. This rehearsal is free of charge and open to the public.

Feb. 26 at 4 p.m. Cordiner Hall

Skotheim Lecture: Prof. Leonard V. Smith - Geography, Sovereignty, and Drawing the Boundaries of Syria after World War I

Oberlin College professor Leonard V. Smith is the author of: The Embattled Self: French Soldiers' Testimony of the Great War (Cornell University Press, 2007); France and the Great War, 1914-1918 (with Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau and Annette Becker, Cambridge University Press, 2003); and Between Mutiny and Obedience: The Case of the French Fifth Infantry Division During World War I (Princeton University Press, 1994). He has held fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Humanities Center. Smith has been a visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Claremont McKenna College, and the Associated Kyoto Program at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. Smith's current monograph project, Sovereignty at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919: The 'Laboratory over a Vast Cemetery,' is under contract to Oxford University Press. His most recent publications include "Empires at the Paris Peace Conference," in Empires at War, 1912-1923 (Oxford University Press, 2014); and "Mutiny," in Cambridge History of the First World War, 3 vols. (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. Olin Hall, Olin 130

Lecture: The Next Sputnik

Join Dr. Brent Maddin, provost of the Relay Graduate School of Education, for a lecture and discussion titled The Next Sputnik: What is the next focusing event for American public education? In his talk, Maddin will recount the mobilizing effect that Sputnik had on the American public education system - particularly science education - and explore how recent education reforms and potential future innovations can realign what has become a broken system that is failing the most vulnerable students.

Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. Hunter Conservatory, Kimball Theatre

Samuel Jones Festival Keynote Address: Walter Simmons - Twentieth-Century American Composers: The Traditionalist Path

Walter Simmons is a musicologist and critic who has devoted more than 30 years to increasing the general public's enjoyment and understanding of concert music. He has written hundreds of articles and reviews published in Fanfare, American Music, American Record Guide, Music Journal and Musical America, as well as entries in The New Grove and other reference books. In addition to being executive producer of recordings of major 20th-century works that were previously unknown, Simmons has worked in radio as producer, commentator on a weekly radio series and as a guest on Performance Today and other programs on NPR. His mission is the discovery and dissemination of 20th-century classical music that embodies traditional aesthetic values of beauty, clarity and emotional expression. In his two books Voices in the Wilderness: Six American Neo-Romantic Composers (Bloch, Hanson, Giannini, Creston, Barber, Flagello) and Voices of Stone and Steel: The Music of William Schuman, Vincent Persichetti, and Peter Mennin, he attempts to bring to the awareness of the music world great works that have not yet been recognized. This lecture is free of charge and open to the public with reception to follow.

Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. Hall of Music, Chism Recital Hall

Mission Ridge Alpine Ski

Spend the weekend skiing at Mission Ridge, one of the best places around, and stay overnight at a Whitman graduate's house (primetime homework time). Sign up at the Outdoor Program rental shop.

Feb. 27 and 28

Fridays at Four: Music 360° Samuel Jones Festival

Fridays at Four presents a recital featuring Whitman faculty and students performing chamber works by Dr. Jones. This recital is in conjunction with the Music 360°: Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones festival presented by the Walla Walla Symphony and Whitman College, and is free of charge and open to the public. The recital program is as follows: Four Haiku for voice, violin and piano (featuring Monica Griffin, Amy Dodds and Jackie Wood); In Retrospect from Janus, for string quintet and piano; Piano Sonata (featuring David Kim); intermission; Two Movements for Harpsichord (featuring Kraig Scott) - Renewing to Serve and Cello and Piano Sonata (featuring Sally Singer, and Jackie Wood).

Feb. 27 at 4 p.m. Hall of Music, Chism Recital Hall

Staging Memory in Times of Violence: A Conversation with Peruvian Author Rafael Dumett

Dumett's unique experience as a playwright, scholar and novelist during the Internal War in Peru is presented in an extended interview conducted by Carlos Vargas-Salgado, assistant professor of Spanish. Through Dumett's many plays, screenplays and more recent novels, the author discusses the presence of memories as cultural and personal resources to embody history and its challenges. Open to the general public.

Feb. 27 at 4 p.m. Olin Hall, Olin 157

Lecture: Visiting Artist Paul Cantanese - The Hand and The Machine

Lecture by visiting artist/educator for The Hand and The Machine series Paul Cantanese. Brought to campus by the Department of Studio Art through a grant from the McMillen Foundation. Opening reception for The Hand and The Machine to follow in the Sheehan Gallery.

Feb. 27 at 5.30 p.m. Olin Hall, Olin 130

Comedy: Tracey Ashley

Known for her seamless storytelling, sharp material and hilarious punchlines, Tracey Ashley is a comedienne on the rise. Ashley was a semifinalist on NBC's Last Comic Standing, and has appeared on numerous television programs. A popular performer on college campuses, Ashley was nominated for best female performer by Campus Activities magazine.

Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. Reid Campus Center, Coffeehouse

Music 360°: Samuel Jones Festival, Whitman College Chamber Singers and Orchestra Concert

The Department of Music presents a concert featuring the Whitman College Chamber Singers and Orchestra performing the music of Dr. Jones. This concert is in conjunction with the Music 360°: Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones festival presented by the Walla Walla Symphony and Whitman College, and is free of charge and open to the public.

Feb. 27 at 7.30 p.m. Cordiner Hall

Beginning Cross-country Skiing

Spend the day cross-country skiing at Horseshoe Prairie. No experience necessary. Sign up at the Outdoor Program rental shop.

Feb. 28

¡Escríbelo tú mismo! A Creative Writing Workshop Entirely in Spanish

Acclaimed Peruvian playwright Rafael Dumett conducts this workshop, which provides a fun and engaging way to explore Spanish language through creative exercises. Open to the general public. No previous experience needed. Intermediate Spanish proficiency recommended.

Feb. 28 at 11 a.m. Olin Hall, Olin 157

Music 360°: Samuel Jones Festival, Walla Walla Symphony Open Rehearsal

The Music 360°: Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones festival presents an open rehearsal of the Walla Walla Symphony.

Feb. 28 at 2 p.m. Cordiner Hall

Music 360°: Samuel Jones Festival, Q&A

The Music 360°: 'Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones festival presents a Q&A with Dr. Samuel Jones, John David Earnest, Walter Simmons and Yaacov Bergman. Free of charge and open to the public.

Feb. 28 at 4.30 p.m. Cordiner Hall

An Evening with Ryka Aoki

Ryka Aoki is a writer, performer and educator who has been honored by the California State Senate for her "extraordinary commitment to free speech and artistic expression, as well as the visibility and well-being of transgender people." Aoki received an MFA in creative writing from Cornell University and is the recipient of a University Award from the Academy of American Poets. Her chapbook, Sometimes Too Hot the Eye of Heaven Shines, won RADAR's 2010 Eli Coppola Chapbook Contest. Aoki's work appears in the anthologies Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation (Seal Press), and Transfeminist Perspectives (Temple University). Her first full-length volume, Seasonal Velocities, was released in 2012 by Trans-Genre Press and her debut novel, He Mele a Hilo, a lyrical story of interwoven lives in the paradise of Hawaii, was published in 2014 by Topside Press.

Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. Hunter Conservatory, Kimball Auditorium

Walla Walla Symphony Guest Artist Soiree No. 2

The Guest Artist Soiree series features symphony guest artists in an intimate, solo setting and admission includes a delicious glass of Walla Walla wine. This concert is presented as part of Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones, a festival featuring the music and works of Dr. Samuel Jones, presented by the Walla Walla Symphony and Whitman College. Online ticket sales for this event have closed. Tickets will be available at the door.

Feb. 28 at 7.30 p.m. Reid Campus Center, Young Ballroom A

Walla Walla Symphony Pre-Concert Artist Talk

March 1 at 2 p.m. Reid Campus Center, Young Ballroom B

Walla Walla Symphony: Born in the USA

This concert is part of Looking Back...Reaching Forward: The Music of Samuel Jones, a festival featuring the music and works of Dr. Samuel Jones, presented by the Walla Walla Symphony and Whitman College. Copland - Quiet City; Samuel Jones - Concerto for Trombone and Orchestra (Doug Scarborough, trombone); John David Earnest - Southern Exposure; Gershwin - An American in Paris.

March 1 at 3 p.m. Cordiner Hall



Parting Shot

By Halley McCormick '15

Students take in the wide range of topics during last week's Power & Privilege Symposium.


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Compiled by: Bryce Heuett