Jolene Wong
5/10/2002
ENVS-120-A
Final Internship Report


REGIONAL WASTE REDUCTION AND RECYCLING OFFICE: GREEN SEAL UPDATE FOR WHITMAN COLLEGE


GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Green Seal Certification is essentially a Walla Walla county environmental award given to businesses that make the extra effort to incorporate pollution prevention and waste reduction activities into their daily conduct. The major benefit of the award is the public display of the businesses’ dedication to protecting the health of humans and the environment. Consequently, the businesses receive a better public image. The objectives of the Green Seal internship at Whitman College were 1.) File a report on each certified Whitman College building in the hopes of renewing their Green Seals and 2.) Create a more comprehensive report for Whitman as a whole. As the internship progressed, however, it was apparent that a new way of evaluating Whitman was needed; rather than reporting on individual buildings, which is too repetitious and confusing, and therefore somewhat ineffective, it was more valuable to file a single report for Whitman as one entity. At that point the goal of the internship changed: instead of filing reports requesting renewal for many individual Whitman building, there would be an application for Green Seal Certification for Whitman as a whole. However, further into the semester it seemed the revised evaluation of Whitman would be too broad. Being too late to start from scratch, the work on the broad report of Whitman was to be complete as best as possible and, at the same time, focus a greater amount of energy on creating a new format for next year’s renewal report.

A Green Seal application was completed for Whitman College as one body. In addition, a draft for the format of a future report on the college was drawn up. It consisted of four divisions: Whitman campus in general, the industrial element of the college, offices of the college, and the residence halls. Each division will be evaluated on: waste prevention/reduction strategies, recycling strategies, recycled content purchases, hazardous material practices, education/awareness strategies, and future goals. The evaluator’s suggestions should also be included for each division. Additionally, a few example questionnaires were written for specific department heads.

CONTACTS

1. Chuck Templeton, Whitman College Chemistry Professor. Phone #: (509) 527-5799. E-mail: templeton@whitman.edu

2. Amber Shay, Leader in Recycling and Pick-up at Whitman College. Phone #: (509) 527-5738. E-mail: shayal@whitman.edu

3. Bob Biles, Whitman Recycling Coordinator and Landscape Specialist. Phone #: (509) 527-5999.

4. Brad Humberd, Birch Creek Construction. Phone #: (541) 938-3672

5 . Cindy Waring, Whitman College Director of Administrative Services (and 8 x 11 paper purchase). Phone #: (509) 527-5970. E-mail: waringcl@whitman.edu

6 . Dan Park, Whitman College Director of The Physical Plant. Phone #: (509) 527-5999. E-mail: park@whitman.edu

7 . Deborah Winter, Chair of Whitman Conservation Committee. Phone #: (509) 527-5123. E-mail: winterd@hitman.edu

8 . Gary Brown, Landscape Maintenance & Motor Pool Supervisor. Phone #: (509) 527-5945. E-mail: brown@whitman.edu

9 . Jed Schwendiman, Whitman College Assistant Director of Residence Life and Member of Whitman Conservation Committee. Phone #: (509) 527-5401. E-mail: schwenjw@whitman.edu

10. Jeff Donehue, Whitman Construction Manager. Phone #: (509) 526-4784. E-mail: donahujb@whitman.edu.

11. Jim Schueler, Whitman College Residence Hall Custodial Supervisor. Phone #: (509) 527-5800. E-mail: schueljh@whitman.edu

12. Kathy Rogers, Safety Coordinator (Hazardous Waste Management/Disposal). Phone #: (509) 527-5946. rogerka@whitman.edu.

13. Kevin Wright, Custodial Supervisor (product purchase for bathrooms). Phone #: (509) 522-4408. E-mail: wrightkd@whitman.edu

14. Leroy Wade, Whitman College Organic Chemistry Professor & Chemical Stockroom Manager. Phone #: (509) 527-5223. E-mail: wadelg@whitman.edu

15. Peter Harvey, Whitman College Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer. Phone #: (509) 527-5993. E-mail: harvey@whitman.edu

16. Scott Towslee, Whitman College Maintenance Supervisor. Phone #: (509) 527-5044. E-mail: towslegs@whitman.edu

17. Tova Cochrane, Internship Sponsor and Green Seal/Composting Specialist. Phone #: (509) 527-3282. E-mail: tcochrane@co.walla-walla.wa.us

18 . Travis Watts, Whitman College Project Engineer. Phone #: (509) 524-2009 or (509) 520-2540. E-mail: wattstl@whitman.edu

19 . Wilbur Pribilsky, President of Bur-Bee (toilet paper). Phone #: (509) 525-5040.



Regional Waste Reduction and Recycling Office

For Walla Walla and Columbia Counties

A Division of the Walla Walla County Regional Planning Department

310 West Poplar * Suite #001 * Walla Walla, WA 99362

Phone: 509-527-5282 · FAX 509-527-1892

_______________________________________________________________________________

Green Seal Application

Business Name: Whitman College
Address: Walla Walla, WA 99362
Business Contact Person/Green Seal Coordinator: Jolene Wong
Phone: 509-527-5565
Fax: None
email: wongjz@whitman.edu

Please answer the questions below. Write "N/A" if the question does not apply to your business.

 

 

Business Management

Please write, or attach separately, your Green Seal Policy Statement below. Explain how you have posted the statement in your business for both employees and customers or clients to see.

Whitman’s environmental policy statement from their website (http://www.whitman.edu/news/environprinciples,

Environmental Principles for Whitman College

Recognizing the impact Whitman College has on the environment and the leadership role Whitman College plays as an institution of higher learning, the College affirms the following environmental principles and standards, which shall be consulted to explore the practical ways Whitman College can promote an environmentally conscious campus.

• To reduce the amount of non-recyclable materials used; to reuse whatever materials may be reused; and, to utilize
recycled materials whenever possible.
• To consider the eco-friendliest science and technology available to decrease our environmental impact.
• To continue to build an energy-efficient campus in the 21st century.
• To patronize companies that are active in their defense of the environment from further degradation.
• To encourage individuals’ environmental accountability through programs of environmental education.
• To consider environmentally friendly options when they exist and are practical in decisions regarding developmental projects.
• To further the use of reused materials, recyclable materials, and the Internet in campus communications.
• To encourage and request food service to make environmentally friendly decisions in purchasing food and supplies, reducing waste, and reusing materials.
• To maintain campus grounds through the employment of bio-friendly substances and services.
• To strive to improve upon current practices so we may harmonize the trends of the industrial world with the natural environment.

Also, Whitman’s environmental policy statement from the Student Handbook, commonly known as the “Look-Book” states:

Reduce, Re-Use, Recycle

Whitman College strives to be an environmentally responsible institution. The Whitman campus will be your home for the next four years, and you are encouraged to be a conscientious community member. Please reuse materials whenever you can, reduce unnecessary consumption, and conserve energy. For example, turning off lights when leaving unattended rooms, conserving use of water and heat, and recycling disposables whenever possible is important in the flow of resources. Recycling is an important responsibility of student living. Each residence hall section has appropriate containers for paper, cardboard, plastic, aluminum and glass. Please deposit recycling in these containers and encourage others to do so as well. Off-campus students, staff, and faculty have the convenience of curbside recycling provided by the City of Walla Walla for
newspapers, glass, magazines, plastic, aluminum, and tin. Students who live in off-campus housing are encouraged to bring recyclable materials to the “Outhouse,” 424 Boyer Avenue. Items which can be used by others should be donated to local thrift stores rather than thrown away in trash receptacles.

In addition, please consider these few simple actions which can significantly reduce unnecessary consumption of natural resources: reusing envelopes for campus mail, printing and taking notes on the second side of previously used paper, bringing your own drinking container to dining halls, and exchanging clothes and possessions, rather than buying new ones.

List three incentives or training opportunities you have provided your employees to encourage participation in the Green Seal Program.

The Residence Hall Assistants, or RAs, are trained as to what can and cannot be recycled at the halls. They in-turn train their sections, and assign days that roommates must carry the recycling outside to the pick-up location. Recycling bins are located in each section lounge, and are labeled. Faculty and staff are informed of what can be recycled and how it should be recycled. However, incentives or training programs for participation in the Green Seal Program specifically have not been installed.

 

How will you notify your customers or clients of your environmental efforts and Green Seal participation?

Green Commencement Ribbons have been given to graduating senior that have taken a social and environmental pledge. The Whitman Alumni Connections publication Whitman advertises the recycled content of the publication with a recycling symbol. This assists in making Whitman’s image “greener”. Green Seal window stickers will be placed near the entrances to all buildings.

SECTION II

WASTE REDUCTION

Describe how you maintain a litter-free zone around your facility.

There are bins for recycling in all buildings. Garbage cans, usually with recycling options, are located outside most buildings. In addition, during the construction of the new Reid Campus Center, all building and hard surface drainage were handled on site, rather than draining into local waterways or storm drainage.

 

Explain the ways you are reducing energy consumption. Do you keep records of your utility usage?

Four years ago the French House’s windows were replaced to be more efficient at keeping heat inside. All the interest houses have switched to natural gas furnaces. The Science Building uses heating from a natural underground water source. Remodeling to the Science Building will save energy as well. Eight energy efficiency measures are used at Reid Campus Center. They include: natural day lighting, improved efficiency lighting, efficient glazing, architectural shading options, increased number of air handlers, efficient chillers, natural ventilation, and interactive model with downsizing of equipment for combined energy savings. The Reid Campus Center will utilize approximately 25% less energy than a building constructed to meet the Washington Energy Code. Occupancy sensors and manual overrides for daylight will reduce lighting energy use on the third floor by approximately 30%. By admitting daylight to the entire Pavilion and installing an automatic daylight-sensing and dimming system to adjust lighting in response to daylight, the Pavilion is projected to use 38% less energy than would have been allowed by the Washington Energy Code. Furthermore, solar panes will soon be installed at the Environmental House, and the roof and windows in Anderson Hall will be replaced to save energy.

 

Explain improvements to your equipment or vehicle maintenance program, and describe how these have resulted in reduced waste and improved efficiency.

Pop machines’ lights go off till touched, saving energy.

 

What materials do you reuse?

Leaves, bark and grass are used for mulching. One-side paper is reused. Waste oil is burned for heat.

 

What materials do you use that are durable and refillable?

Pallets are reused in transporting materials. Durable, sustainable building materials
used in the construction of Reid Campus Center include: brick, tile, and wood.

 

How do you reduce packaging?

N/A for Whitman College since it does not produce and send any products.

 

Develop a new waste reduction method applicable to your business and describe below.

A Paper Conservation Campaign was a joint project of WCTS and Whitman’s Conservation Committee. The program was designed to save paper in the labs and library. In the project, a web page was been set up that counts all pages printed out of printers in these locations, and a bar graph was be set up in the labs to remind people of the sheer quantity of paper they print. Discounts have been made for students and consumers if they bring their own eating ware to dining halls or cafes. The hope is to reduce the use of disposable eating ware. In addition, students have begun to send their research surveys online instead of on paper, conserving paper. Challenge weeks have been established for sometime now, in which, for example, students have the option of unplugging all their electronic equipment for one week.

 

Estimate the percentage of employees that participate in the above waste reduction practices.

N/A, considering all programs cannot keep track of students, faculty, and staff that participate in the programs.


SECTION III

RECYCLING

Please check the box that applies to your business:

Waste Stream
Recycle
Paper
 
X
White Ledger Paper
 
X
Computer Paper
X
  Mixed Waste Paper
 
X
Newsprint
 
X
Corrugated Cardboard
    Terra Pak
   
Glass
 
X
Clear
X
  Colored
   
Plastics
 
X
PET(SP#1)
 
X
HDPE (SP#2)
   
Metals
 
X
Aluminum
 
X
Tin
 
X
Ferrous Metal
   
Chemicals
 
X
Antifreeze
 
X
Used Oil
X
  Solvent
   
Organic Material
 
X
Yard Clippings
 
X
Wood Debris

List items you recycle.

In the demolition of the old SUB, concrete, high beams, wood, doors, cabinets, and copper wire were all recycled. Most plastic packaging on materials Whitman receives are coded and recycled. Old furniture is sometimes sold at yard sales or donated. The cleaner for the parts washer is recycled, as are batteries.

 

Estimate the percentage of your employees that participate in the above recycling practices.

N/A, impossible to calculate.

 

What recycling opportunities do you offer your customers or clients? How do you inform them of these opportunities?

During the construction of REID, a recycling program was creating for packaging and wastes from the onsite office. All offices, residence halls, and buildings are supplied with recycling bins. RAs, students, faculty, and staff are briefed about recycling options.

 

What is the estimated total percentage recycled from your total waste stream?

Estimated total percentage recycled from Whitman’s total waste stream: 33 percent. However, Whitman will soon stop doing garbage pick up from the kitchens, which create about 29 percent of total waste. As a result, the total percentage of recycled from Whitman’s waste stream will probably increase.

SECTION IV


COMPLETING THE CYCLE

List the recycled items that your business purchases.


Whitman will sometimes buy old furniture. The plastic product called trek, a recycled material, has also been purchased and used as a construction material (picnic tables were built out of the material). Nearly all of the 8 x 11 paper bought this year has a 30 percent recycled content, though 24 pallets of 100 percent recycled content paper was also purchased. The carpet in the Reid Campus Center is a 100% pos-consumer product. In addition, the toilet surrounds are made from recycled plastic, and the acoustical ceiling system contains a significant percentage of recycled mineral fiber. All paper towels in bathrooms on-campus have 100 percent recycled content. The toilet paper is also made form recycled content.


SECTION V

HAZARDOUS MATERIAL

List the hazardous materials your business uses or produces.

Whitman usually buys latex paint. Sometimes, however, enamel paint is used (which has special disposal methods). The Biology Department, the Chemistry Department, the Art Department, the Motor pool Department, Landscape Maintenance, the Academic Custodial Department, and the Residence Hall Custodial Department all use hazardous materials.

Describe the steps you have taken to educate your employees about proper handling and disposal of hazardous materials.

Any one who works with hazardous materials is required to have training about those hazardous materials (how to store them, what to do if they spill, and so forth).

 

Describe the ways you have reduced the use of toxic/hazardous materials.

Low VOC (volatile organic compound) materials such as water based paints and varnishes were used in the construction of the Reid Campus Center. Whitman’s parts washer uses a relatively less hazardous material. In addition, Whitman buys 8 x 11 paper from Badger, an environmentally excellent paper mill that does not use chlorine.

SECTION VI

CONCLUSION

May we use the information in this application in Green Seal Publications?

Yes, information from this Green Seal application may be used in Green Seal Publications.

 

The Walla Walla County Waste Reduction and Recycling Office welcomes any comments or suggestions you may wish to contribute to the overall Green Seal Program.

In addition to requesting information about recycled items purchased, perhaps a sustainable building materials section could be included. Also, an environmental education/awareness (to the community outside of the workplace) section could be useful.

 

Proposed Outline and Format for Future Green Seal Renewal


ALL SECTIONS WILL INCOMPASS POLLUTION PREVENTION ASPECTS IN THESE CATEGORIES: GENERAL INFORMATION OF SECTION, WASTE PREVENTION/REDUCTION STRATEGIES, RECYCLIG STRATEGIES, RECYCLED CONTENT PURCHASES, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, FUTURE GOALS, EDUCATION/AWARENESS STRATEGIES, AND SUGGESTIONS.

I. CAMPUS IN GENERAL

II. INDUSTRIAL ASPECT OF BUSINESS: I.E. INVENTORY, PURCHASING, RECEIVING, PROCESSING, PACKAGING, DELIVERY, EQUIPMENT, COMPOST/LANDSCAPING, ETC. (EVERYTHING EXCEPT OFFICE)


A. PHYSICAL PLANT
B. SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
C. ART DEPARTMENT
D. SHEEHAN GALLERY
F. TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
G. HEALTH CENTER

III. OFFICES

A. BUSINESS OFFICES

1. ACADEMIC RESOURCES
2. ADMISSIONS
3. ALUMNI RELATIONS
4. AMERICA READS
5. ATHLETIC TRAINING
6. BOOKSTORE
7. BUSINESS OFFICE
8. CAREER CENTER
9. CENTER FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE
10. COMMUNICATIONS
11. CONFERENCE AND EVENTS
12. CORDINER HALL
13. COUNSELING CENTER
14. DEAN OF FACULTY
15. DEAN OF STUDENTS
16. DEVELOPMENT
17. FINANCIAL AID SERVICES
18. GRANTS AND SPONSORED PROGRAMS
19. HEALTH CENTER
20. HUMAN RESOURCES
21. INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH
22. INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA SERVICES
23. INTERCULTURAL CENTER
24. LANGUAGE LEARNING CENTER
25. MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPMENT LAB
26. MUSEUM
27. OUTDOOR PROGRAM
28. PENROSE MEMORIAL LIBRARY
29. PRESIDENT’S OFFICE
30. PHYSICAL PLANT
31. REGISTRAR
32. REID CAMPUS CENTER
33. RESIDENCE LIFE
34. SECURITY
35. SHEEHAN GALLERY
36. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT RESPONSE NETWORK
37. STUDENT ACTIVITIES
38. STUDENT ABROAD
39. STUDENT DANCE LAB
40. TECHNOLOGY SERVICES


B. ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT OFFICES

1. ART
2. ASIAN STUDIES
3. ASTRONOMY
4. CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING
5.CHINESE
6. CHEMISTRY
7. CLASSICS
8. ECONOMICS
9. EDUCATION
10. ENGLISH
11. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
12. FRENCH
13. GENDER STUDIES
14. GENERAL STUDIES
15. GEOLOGY
16. GERMAN
17. HISTORY
18. JAPANESE
19. MATHEMATICS
20. MUSIC
21. PHILOSOPHY
22. PHYSICAL EDUCATION
23. PHYSICS
24. PSYCHOLOGY
25. RELIGION
26. RHETORIC
27. SOCIOLOGY
28. SPANISH
29. THEATRE
IV. RESIDENCE HALLS
A. ANDERSON HALL
B. COLLEGE HOUSE
C. DOUGLAS HALL
D. INTEREST HOUSES
E. JEWETT HALL
F. LYMAN HOUSE
G. MARCUS HOUSE
H. NORTH HALL
I. PRENTISS HALL

 

Whitman Campus in General
General Information
Waste Prevention/Reduction Strategies
   
Recycling Strategies
Recycled Content Purchases
   
Hazardous Materials
Future Goals
   
Education Awareness Strategies
Suggestions
   


 
General Information
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  

 

 
Waste Prevention/Reduction Strategies
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  

 

 
Recycling Strategies
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  


 
Recycled Content Purchases
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  

 
Hazardous Materials Practices
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  

 
Future Goals
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  

 

 
Education/Awareness Strategies
Art Department  
Health Center  
Physical Plant  
Science Department  
Sheehan Gallery  
Technology Services  

 
Business Offices
Department Offices
Residence Halls
General Information      
Waste Prevention/Reduction Strategies      
Recycling Strategies      
Recycled Content Purchases      
Hazardous Material Practices
N/A
N/A
Future Goals      
Education/Awareness Strategies      
Suggestions      

 

VALUE TO COMMUNITY

The Green Seal Certification will give Whitman a better public image, particularly as a “greener” business. This is especially the case since Whitman’s website, and other campus-wide publications, can declare certification (individual building certification would make this impossible). A better public image means more pride for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the Walla Walla community. In addition, it would probably make Whitman College more attractive to prospective students. Being certified also supports the Green Seal Program, and enforces the importance of business responsibility and concern for health and the environment. Furthermore, renewing the Green Seal will obligate Whitman to reevaluate their environmental status annually. Those renewal reports should provide good documentation of Whitman’s progress and areas that need to be improved.

PROBLEMS & DIFFICULTIES

As said earlier, there were several problems during the course of this internship. First, certifying individual buildings was not beneficial for the college as a whole, and filing reports individually was confusing and repetitious. However, while completing the Green Seal application for Whitman College (as one entity) it was clear that a business this large and complex would need a special format for filing a renewal report. So, a proposal for next year’s renewal report was written in addition.

Unfortunately, another major problem during the internship was the lack of personal incentive and proactive action. As a result, a significant portion of the work was not completed till the end of the term. Naturally, getting information from key contacts is difficult under such time restraints. However, a sufficient amount of information was obtained, and the Green Seal application was adequately completed.

EXPERIENCE & LEARNING

The internship took a good deal of time. However, it is actually quite difficult to measure the average amount of hours I spent on the internship each week, considering I didn’t work on the internship in a propionate amount during the semester. Despite the complications of this internship (and that the project reinforced my problems as a student), I have definitely had a positive experience. The internship gave me the chance to do work that I had not even come close to before. First and foremost, I have never done a project of such importance. In fact, I probably have never done a project that was not solely for my academic work. Contacting important people, being professional, evaluating such a huge business, and working with a sponsor were very new – and a little scary. Of course, I learned many new general business skills (interviewing, note taking, creating new, more efficient documents, etc.) as well as better organization and log keeping.

RECOMMENDATIONS

If there happens to be an intern assigned to this internship in the future, it would be wise to continue working with the sponsor to perfect the new format for Whitman’s Green Seal evaluation/renewal report. Also, few people seem to be aware of the existence of the Green Seal, or what it implies. Perhaps the intern could, besides revising and completing the renewal report for Whitman, inform the Whitman community, or even the Walla Walla community, about the Green Seal. Without a basic understanding of what the Green Seal is, its benefits are minimal. Furthermore, the intern could work with the college to display the Green Seal on Whitman’s website, and large publications (i.e. Student Handbook).

REFLECTIONS

Looking back, I have regrets and pride in my work on this internship. Though, in the end, I produced useful work, I managed to delay completing it – particularly with calling contacts. Nevertheless, this internship has been valuable to me. Hopefully it will encourage me to complete work in advance, as unlikely as that seems. If I do not assist completing next year’s renewal report, I will undoubtedly continue to attend Whitman Conservation Committee meetings when possible. Also, Cindy Waring is an incredibly nice person who is very enthusiastic about improving Whitman environmentally. She mentioned some work that needs to be done. I won’t mind working with her next year.