• Tell a friend of yours that ending interpersonal violence is important to you.
  • Add the phrase “ Green Dot supporter” to your Facebook or MySpace profile.
  • Using email, text, Facebook or MySpace – send a mass message out to all your friends that violence prevention matters to you.
  • Visit the YWCA rape crisis center and volunteer for one hour.
  • Participate in a 2-hour Sexual Misconduct First Responder Training to become a knowledgeable resource for victims.
  • Believe that violence against men/women is unacceptable and say it out loud.
  • Write an opinion piece for the Pio on ending sexual misconduct.
  • Speak up when you hear comments that are offensive, derogatory or abusive.
  • Don’t laugh at sexist or homophobic jokes.
  • Design a Green Dot poster, button, t-shirt or bookmark.
  • Attend a program or event designed to raise awareness about interpersonal violence.
  • Refuse to fund sexist movies, music, books and magazines.
  • Join the Whitman Green Dot Facebook page.
  • Send a mass email to your contact list with a message like,
    “The issue of interpersonal violence is important to me and I believe in the goal of reducing sexual violence at Whitman.”
  • Have a conversation with a younger man/boy or woman/girl who looks up to you about how important it is to help end violence.
  • Write a check to a local domestic violence shelter or rape crisis center and write “ Green Dot supporter” in the memo line.
  • Change your email signature line to include the statement “Proud to be a Green Dot supporter.”
  • Have a conversation with at least two different people in your life about Green Dot and why it is important to you.
  • Ask at least one friend or coworker to contribute one Green Dot to the Whitman map.
  • Share your Green Dot moment with at least one friend or co-worker.
  • Request a Green Dot presentation at your next staff meeting, training or in-service.
  • Make a contribution or host a fund-raiser for your local domestic violence shelter or rape crisis center.
  • Challenge your friends or co-workers to contribute Green Dots to the Whitman map by having a “ GREEN DOT DAY” (or any other creative challenge).
  • Print off one of the posters/fliers under available on the Green Dot website and hang it in your room or office.
  • Make one announcement to one group or organization you are involved in, telling them about Green Dot Whitman and give them the web site address.
  • If you are concerned that a friend of yours might be a victim of violence, gently ask if you can help and respect their answer.
  • Create a fund-raiser for a campus or community organization that works to address interpersonal violence.
  • Wear a “Consent is Sexy” button.
  • Ask for consent when you are in an intimate situation with another person.
  • Participate in the 35-hour sexual assault/domestic violence training program at the Walla Walla YWCA.
  • Empower sexual assault victims to shatter the silence and tell their stories.
  • Attend the annual “Take Back the Night Rally and March.”
  • If you’re going out drinking, designate someone to stay sober and ensure everyone comes and goes together.
  • Work to bring an educational program on preventing violence to your class or student group.
  • If you see a friend coming on too strong to a person who may be too drunk to make informed decisions, distract, redirect or interrupt.
  • If you see a friend who may be too drunk to make informed decisions, check in and consider staying with them until you get them home.
  • If you’re going out drinking and plan on hooking up, make decisions in advance with your friends about how much you want to do with who – and then enforce them with each other.
  • If you see someone at a party who looks like they are in trouble, ask if they are OK.
  • If you see something unfolding at a party that is high-risk and you are too embarrassed or shy to confront it – get someone else to.
  • If you see a friend doing something shady, step in and say something to them.
  • Intervene if someone is pressuring another student to drink or use drugs.
  • Notice signs of potential abuse or violence and respond.
  • Where appropriate, bring educational programming on interpersonal violence to your class.
  • Where appropriate, include topics that address partner violence, sexual assault and stalking – prevention and intervention – in your classes.
  • Make it clear to your students that if they are dealing with violence you are a safe person to approach for support and referrals.
  • Participate in a Sexual Misconduct First-Responder training program to learn about campus and community resources, and making referrals.
  • Consider conducting research that furthers our understanding of violence prevention.
  • Include a statement on your course syllabus that expresses support for victims of violence and intolerance of all forms of violence.
  • Assign readings or papers or journal topics on the issue of power-based personal violence.
  • Talk with faculty colleagues about the importance of prevention.
  • Recognize risk factors associated with violence and ensure there is adequate policy and training to respond.
  • Ensure adequate funding for prevention and intervention efforts.
  • Talk with colleagues about your personal commitment to violence prevention and Green Dot.
  • Integrate references to the Green Dot  initiative and the importance of violence prevention into speeches and public addresses.
  • Educate yourself and your staff about sexual violence, intimate partner violence, stalking and abuse.
  • Bring Green Dot training to your next staff meeting or in-service.
  • Ensure you have effective policies in place to ensure safety in the workplace and support victims of violence.
  • Tell a woman in your life that sexual assault and domestic violence matters to you.
  • Ask a woman in your life how the issue of sexual and physical violence has impacted her.
  • Ask a woman in your life what you can do to help take a stand against violence.
  • Have one conversation with one male friend or relative about the Green Dot initiative.
  • Ask one male friend or relative what he thinks about violence against women and what men could do to help stop it.
  • Visit the Jackson Katz website (www.jacksonkatz.com/) and read “10 Things Men Can Do To End Gender Violence.”
  • Have a conversation with a younger man or boy who looks up to you about how important it is for men to help end violence.
  • Google “men against violence” and read what men around the country are doing.
  • If you notice symptoms or signs that make you suspect abuse or violence, always ask and provide resources.
  • Ensure all your intake forms ask questions that screen for violence. Then follow up with referrals and resources.
  • Have educational materials from your local domestic violence shelter and rape crisis center displayed in your office.
  • Provide training to your staff from local experts to ensure competence in the area of power-based personal violence.
  • Change your email signature line to include the statement “Proud to be a Green Dot supporter.”
  • Write a check to the local YMCA rape crisis center and write “Green Dot supporter” in the memo line.
  • Have one conversation with one co-worker about Green Dot Whitman and tell them that ending violence matters to you.
  • Make one announcement to one group or organization you are involved in, telling them about Green Dot Whitman.
  • Send a mass email to your contact list with a simple message like, “I believe in the goal of reducing interpersonal violence at Whitman.”
  • Ask 5 women in your life how sexual violence and dating or domestic violence has impacted them (directly or indirectly) and listen to their response.
  • Think about the women and children in your life that you care most about, and consider that they have 1 in 3 odds of becoming victims of violence in their lifetime. Tell one person how you would feel if she did become a victim.
  • Educate yourself about the impact of violence on victims and those who love them.