Portrait of Chanel Meyers

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Biography

Born and raised in Hawaii, Assistant Professor of Psychology Chanel Meyers became interested in how racial diversity impacts how we deal with race and identity. Moving to the “mainland” U.S., where she earned her B.S. in psychology at Western Oregon University, was a culture-shock.

Meyers says, "As a multiracial individual, I began to question my own racial identity and how one’s environment shapes experiences." 

Meyers returned to Hawai‘i to obtain her Ph.D. in social psychology at the University of Hawai‘i, where she began to investigate these questions.

Meyers completed her postdoctoral training at York University in Toronto, Canada, before arriving back in the Pacific Northwest, and joining the psychology faculty at Whitman College.

Meyers' program of research examines how increasing diversity in society shapes intergroup processes across contexts and groups. Using a social-cognitive approach, Meyers examines how contexts and social norms influence cognition, behaviors and social interactions, with a focus on racial diversity, race-related norms and social perception. Her research highlights the experiences of underrepresented racial groups in psychology and builds theories within intergroup relations that are inclusive of these growing populations.

Meyers uses a wide variety of methodologies in this research, including but not limited to: qualitative interviews, eye-tracking, mouse-tracking, implicit measures, longitudinal surveys and self-report measures. She is interested in working with students and using lived experiences to investigate important questions about how we navigate our social world.

Outside of the lab and classroom, Meyers enjoys cooking, bicycling and playing board games with her husband, Rob, and their dog, Gungi.

Ph.D., Social Psychology
University of Hawai’i at Manoa,
2018

B.S. Psychology
Western Oregon University,
2012

Assistant Professor Chanel Meyers' research centers around three main areas: racial diversity, race-related norms and social perception.  Her program of research examines how increasing diversity in society shapes intergroup processes across contexts and groups. The research highlights the experiences of underrepresented racial groups in psychology and builds theories within intergroup relations that are inclusive of these growing populations.

Meyers uses a wide variety of methodologies in this research, including but not limited to: qualitative interviews, eye-tracking, mouse-tracking, implicit measures, longitudinal surveys and self-report measures. She is interested in working with students and using lived experiences to investigate important questions about how we navigate our social world.

The Diversity and Social Cognition lab, led by Meyers, employs a rich set of methodologies that include experience sampling, longitudinal approaches, analyzing nonverbal behaviors, reverse correlation, eye tracking and mouse tracking paradigms, to test assumptions about intergroup relations across three main areas: racial diversity, race-related norms, and social perception.

Learn more about the Diversity and Social Cognition lab and its current work on the lab's website. 

Meyers, C., Williams, A., Pauker, K., & Apfelbaum, E. (in press). The impact of social norms on navigating race in a racially diverse context. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations.

Meyers, C., Leon, A.*, & Williams, A. (2020). Aggressive confrontation shapes perceptions and attitudes toward racist content online. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 23(6), 845-862.https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430220935974

Meyers, C., Aumer, K., Schoniwitz, A., Janicki, C., Pauker, K., Chang, E. C., Gaither, S. E., & Williams, A. (2020). Experiences with microaggressions and discrimination in racially diverse and homogeneously white contexts. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 26(2), 250–259. https://doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000293

Garay, M.*, Meyers, C., Remedios, J. & Pauker, K. (2019). Looking like vs. acting like your race: Social activism shapes perception of multiracial individuals. Self and Identity.https://doi.org/10.1080/15298868.2019.1659848

Wilton, L., Bell, A., Young, D., Carpinella, C., Meyers, C., & Clapham, R. (2018). Lay theories of gender influence support for Women and Transgender people’s legal rights. Social Psychology and Personality Science.10(7),883–894.https://doi.org/10.1177/1948550618803608

Pauker, K., Meyers, C., Sanchez, D. T., Gaither, S. E., & Young, D. M. (2018). A review of Multiracial malleability: Identity, categorization, and shifting racial attitudes. Social and Personality Psychology Compass.https://doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12392

Pauker, K., Carpinella, C., Meyers, C., Young, D., & Sanchez, D. (2017). The role of diversity exposure in Whites’ reduction in race essentialism over time. Social Psychology and Personality Science, 9(8), 944–952.https://doi.org/10.1177/1948550617731496

Williams, A., Oliver, C.,Aumer, K., & Meyers, C. (2016). Racial microaggressions and perceptions of internet memes. Computers in Human Behavior, 63, 424-432. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.067

* = mentored undergraduate/graduate student