Back to 2002-2011: Rhetoric and Film Studies and a Major, Part I

2006-07 Rhetoric and Film Studies

Robert Sickels, Chair

James Hanson (on Sabbatical, Spring 2007)

Robert M. Withycombe

Traditionally, the discipline of rhetoric focused on the effectiveness of the spoken or written word as it is driven by the rhetorical situation (audience, purpose, and context). Over the last several decades, persuasive media have expanded well beyond the conventional spoken and written message. The increasing pervasiveness of film, video, TV, and the Internet in world culture has expanded the mission of rhetorical studies. To reflect these advances in technology and understanding, we focus on the uses of language and image to characterize social reality, to debate and confront controversies, and to aid in the transformation of social institutions. Accordingly, the department of rhetoric and film studies is a multidisciplinary program that enriches understanding of the complexity of contemporary communication by providing a solid grounding in the theory, history, production, interpretation, and criticism of a wide variety of written, oral, visual, and filmic texts.

Most rhetoric and film studies courses (except 110, 121,221,222, 165, 250, and 360) satisfy humanities distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 110, 165, 250 and

360 meet fine arts distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 240 and 340 count toward the alternative voices distribution requirement. Rhetoric and Film Studies 121, 221, and 222 do not count as distribution requirements and may not be taken P-D-F.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies major: A minimum of thirty-four credits in rhetoric and film studies, including 160; one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; one of either 240, 250, 340, 350,351,352,371,379, or 380; 487; and either 491 or 498.

Students may substitute up to eight of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the major. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the major.

Senior assessment: All departmental majors will write a substantial thesis during fall semester and will defend that thesis during a one-hour oral examination.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies minor:

A minimum of twenty credits in rhetoric and film studies including one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; and one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379 or 380. Students may substitute up to four of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the minor. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the minor.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4,4 Withycombe

Speech is one of our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of effective speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, teaming to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121  Dramatic Interpretation, Speech, and Debate Practicum

1, 1 Hanson

Participation in dramatic interpretation, speaking events, or debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a course overview, practice twice a week with staff for the first six weeks of the semester, participate in the team practicum, and then one intercollegiate or on-campus tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. May not be taken P-D-F.

160  Introduction to Film Studies

x, 4  Sickels

This course introduces the historical and theoretical fundamentals offllm studies. Representative films will be drawn from a variety of different eras, genres, and countries. Lectures, discussions, tests, and weekly film screenings.

165  Introduction to Filmmaking

4,x Sickels

This course introduces the fundamentals of the visual language and narrative structures of film. Students will collaboratively make their own short films. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160 and consent of instructor. Priority given to Rhetoric and Film Studies majors.

221  Intercollegiate Parliamentary Debate and Speaking Events

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in parliamentary debate, interpretation events, and/or speaking events throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare for two events, practice each week with staff, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two events (two speaking or interpretation events, or parliamentary debate and one speaking or interpretation events) at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

222  Intercollegiate Policy Debate

 2,2  Hanson

Participation in policy debate throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare research assignments, engage in practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Topics change yearly. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

240  Rhetorical Explorations: Race, Class and Gender

4, x    Hanson

This course seeks to examine the ways in which race, class, and gender based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view race, class, and gender based rhetorical practices. This course may count toward the requirements for the gender studies minor and major.

250  Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

4; not offered 2006-07

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings.

340  Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

x, 4  Withycombe

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early seventeenth century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. May be elected as Politics 349.
 
350  Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4, x   Withycombe

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way so the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. May be elected as Politics 379.

351 Argument in the Law and Politics

4; not offered 2006-07

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policy-making argument. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380.

352 Political Campaign Rhetoric

4; not offered 2006-07

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly in the current election year. The course will examine advertisements, speeches, media coverage, and debates. Class discussions will center on such issues as: 1) How passive or active is the public in campaigns? 2) What makes an effective and beneficial political advertisement? 3) What is the importance of character versus issues in campaigns? 4) What is a good campaign strategy? 5) How do campaigns target or alienate differing groups? May be elected as Politics 352.

360 Advanced Film

x, 4 Sickels

In this intensive workshop course students will be expected to write, storyboard, direct, shoot, and edit an original film of their own creation. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160,165, and/or consent of instructor. Priority given to Rhetoric and Film Studies majors.

365 Special Topics: Studies in Film Genre

4; not offered 2006-07

Students will study the cultural influences on the intersection between the pursuit of artistic achievement and commercial rewards as illustrated by the evolution of a specific genre-e.g. musicals, westerns, noir, horror, combat, screwballs, weepies, etc. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Film genre offerings follow.

366 Special Topics: Major Figures In Film

4

An intensive study of a major figure (or figures) in film, ranging from directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, and actors. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers, and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Major figures offerings follow.

366 Major Figures In Film: "Mean Streets and Raging Bulls": The Silver Age of Cinema

4, x Sickels

In tracing film history from the demise of the studio system in the late 1960s to its rebirth in the early 1980s, students in this course will study the all too brief era known as the American cinema's "silver age," during which maverick film school directors made deeply personal and remarkably influential films. Texts will likely include works by Coppola, DePalma, Friedkin, Altman, Allen, Polanski, Bogdanovich, Kubrick, Malick, and Scorsese. Lectures, discussions, a big research paper, an oral presentation, and weekly film screenings.

368 Special Topics: World Cinema

4

National cinemas not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from early times to contemporary developments in world cinema. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. World cinema offerings follow.

368 Special Topics: German Film

4,x Tobin

German film from the early expressionist masterpieces by Pabst, through Nazi directors, the postwar directors, and concluding with some of the new generation of film makers like Praunbeim and Treut. Readings include excerpts from Kracauer and Adorno. In addition to regular class meetings, a weekly video screening of approximately two hours required. Short critical papers, class discussion, and a final examination are required. Offered in alternate years. May be elected as WLit 279.

371 Rhetoric in Early Western Culture

4; not offered 2006-07

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during several of the great periods of Western thought, beginning with the classical conflict between the Sophists and Platonists in Greece, to the emphasis on the liberally educated person in the Roman Empire, the rhetoric of the church in the Middle Ages, and concluding with the study of logic and argument during the Scottish Enlightenment. May be elected as Classics 371.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4,4

Intensive studies in special topics not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from ancient to contemporary times. The current offerings follow.

380 Special Topics: A History of American Public Address

x, 4 Withycombe

Students examine the creation, reception, and impact of American public discourse from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the process of public advocacy as it occurs in significant political and social movements and during important public controversies.

Examination of public arguments will allow students to better understand the strategic choices available, the limitations and constraints that face advocates, and the nature of critical responses that resulted. Students will better understand the role of public discourse in American history and the relationship between rhetorical practice and public culture.

401,402 Independent Study

1-3,1-3 Withycombe, Hanson, and Sickels

Studies of rhetorical and filmic issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

487  Rhetoric and Film Criticism

4,x Hanson

Students evaluate speeches, film, writing, advertisements, and other diverse forms of communication. The course enables students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which communication influences people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral, written, and visual messages, and to develop scholarly writing skills. Students learn a variety of critical perspectives including NeoAristotlean, author, metaphor, ideology, power and gender relations, and deconstructionism and apply those theories to instances of communication. Open only to, and required of junior or senior Rhetoric and Film Studies majors.

491  Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

2, x  Withycombe

Research and writing of the senior thesis. Open only to, and required of senior majors.

498  Honors Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

2, x  Withycombe

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis. Open only to, and required of senior majors. Prerequisite admission to honors candidacy.

2007-2008 Rhetoric and Film Studies

Robert Sickels, Chair

Amy Corey (Visiting Johnstone Professor)

James Hanson

Robert M. Withycombe

Traditionally, the discipline of rhetoric focused on the effectiveness of the spoken or written word as it is driven by the rhetorical situation (audience, purpose, and context). Over the last several decades, persuasive media have expanded well beyond the conventional spoken and written message. The increasing pervasiveness of film, video, TV, and the Internet in world culture has expanded the mission of rhetorical studies. To reflect these advances in technology and understanding, we focus on the uses of language and image to characterize social reality, to debate and confront controversies, and to aid in the transformation of social institutions. Accordingly, the department of rhetoric and film studies is a multidisciplinary program that enriches understanding of the complexity of contemporary communication by providing a solid grounding in the theory, history, production, interpretation, and criticism of a wide variety of written, oral, visual, and filmic texts.

Most rhetoric and film studies courses (except 110, 121, 221, 222, 165, 250, and 360) satisfy humanities distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 110, 165, 250 and 360 meet fine arts distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 240 and 340 count toward the alternative voices distribution requirement.

Rhetoric and Film Studies 121, 221, and 222 do not count as distribution requirements and may not be taken P-D-F.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies major: A minimum of 34 credits in rhetoric and film studies, including 160; one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379, or 380; 487; and either 491 or 498.

Students may substitute up to eight of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the major. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the major.

Senior assessment: All departmental majors will write a substantial thesis during fall semester and will defend that thesis during a one-hour oral examination.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies minor: A minimum of 20 credits in rhetoric and film studies including one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; and one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379 or 380. Students may substitute up to four of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments).

Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the minor. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the minor.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4, 4 Hanson, Withycombe

Speech is one of our primary means of communication.

This course provides training in the fundamentals of effective speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Dramatic Interpretation, Speech, and Debate Practicum

1, 1 Hanson

Participation in dramatic interpretation, speaking events, or debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a course overview, practice twice a week with staff for the first six weeks of the semester, participate in the team practicum, and then one intercollegiate or on-campus tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. May not be taken P-D-F.

160 Introduction to Film Studies

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the historical and theoretical fundamentals of film studies. Representative films will be drawn from a variety of different eras, genres, and countries. Lectures, discussions, tests, and weekly film screenings.

165 Introduction to Filmmaking

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the fundamentals of the visual language and narrative structures of film. Students will collaboratively make their own short films. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160 and consent of instructor. Priority given to Rhetoric and Film Studies majors.

221 Intercollegiate Parliamentary Debate and Speaking Events

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in parliamentary debate, interpretation events, and/or speaking events throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare for two events, practice each week with staff, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two events (two speaking or interpretation events, or parliamentary debate and one speaking or interpretation events) at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

222 Intercollegiate Policy Debate*

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in policy debate throughout the semester.

Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare research assignments, engage in practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Topics change yearly. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Race, Class and Gender

4; not offered 2007-08

This course seeks to examine the ways in which race, class, and gender based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view race, class, and gender based rhetorical practices. This course may count toward the requirements for the gender studies minor and major.

250 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

4, x Withycombe

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings.

340 Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

4; not offered 2007-08

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early seventeenth century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. May be elected as Politics 349.

350 Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4, x Withycombe

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. May be elected as Politics 379.

351 Argument in the Law and Politics

x, 4 Hanson

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policy-making argument. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380.

352 Political Campaign Rhetoric

4; not offered 2007-08

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly in the current election year. The course will examine advertisements, speeches, media coverage, and debates. Class discussions will center on such issues as: 1) How passive or active is the public in campaigns? 2) What makes an effective and beneficial political advertisement? 3) What is the importance of character versus issues in campaigns? 4) What is a good campaign strategy? 5) How do campaigns target or alienate differing groups? May be elected as Politics 352.

360 Advanced Film

x, 4 Sickels

In this intensive workshop course students will be expected to write, storyboard, direct, shoot, and edit an original film of their own creation. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160, 165, and/or consent of instructor. Priority given to Rhetoric and Film Studies majors.

365 Special Topics: Studies in Film Genre

4; not offered 2007-08

Students will study the cultural influences on the intersection between the pursuit of artistic achievement and commercial rewards as illustrated by the evolution of a specific genre-e.g. musicals, westerns, noir, horror, combat, screwballs, weepies, etc. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Film genre offerings follow.

366 Special Topics: Major Figures in Film

4

An intensive study of a major figure (or figures) in film, ranging from directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, and actors. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers, and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Major figures offerings follow.

366 ST: Major Figures in Film: "The Genius of the System" The Golden Age of Cinema

x, 4 Sickels

In tracing film history from its late nineteenth century beginnings to the 1950s, students in this course will study the era known as the American cinema's "golden age," during which the Hollywood Studio System dictated virtually all aspects of filmmaking. Texts will likely include works by Ford, Hitchcock, Curtiz, Hawks, Capra, Sturges, and others. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings.

368 Special Topics: World Cinema

4

National cinemas not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from early times to contemporary developments in world cinema. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. World cinema offerings follow.

368A ST: Media and Culture in Latino/Latin America

x, 4 Galindo

This course focuses on the increasing presence of Latinos and Latin Americans in the media as a way to explore debates on culture and politics. Topics for class discussion include: media bias, uses of language, representation, marketing and buying power, and political clout. Media to be studied in class ranges from film, TV and radio to print and digital journalism. Students will be evaluated through papers, presentations, and participation. A collective class project will study the current representation of Latino and Latin American cultures in the U.S. media. Taught in English. May be elected as WLit 382 or Spanish 471. Distribution area: humanities or alternative voices.

368B ST: Introduction to French Cinema

x, 4 Hurlburt

An introduction to the major authors and movements of French cinema from the 1930's to the present day. We will study works by film authors such as Renoir, Carné, Tati, Godard, Truffaut, Varda, Kassovitz and Serreau. In addition to required screenings, students will read a broad selection of critical texts introducing the technical, theoretical, cultural, political and economic forces that have shaped the French film industry from the advent of sound through to the present day. Movies will be shown in French with English subtitles. This course will be taught in two sections, one in English and one in French (French 448); the two sections will be combined in English once a week. Distribution area: humanities.

371 Rhetoric in Early Western Culture

x, 4 Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during several of the great periods of Western thought, beginning with the classical conflict between the Sophists and Platonists in Greece, to the emphasis on the liberally educated person in the Roman Empire, the rhetoric of the church in the Middle Ages, and concluding with the study of logic and argument during the Scottish Enlightenment. May be elected as Classics 371.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, 4

Intensive studies in special topics not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from ancient to contemporary times. The current offerings follow.

379A ST: Introduction to Television Studies

4, 4 Corey

This course begins with an exploration of television history and important technological and social developments. In mapping out the televisual landscape, this course then introduces students to a range of television cultures and genres. Through genres such as news, sitcom, drama, soap opera, science fiction, and reality-based television, students will explore narrative structures and practices of looking. This course also introduces critical approaches to the debates surrounding the cultural and political implications of television viewing. These debates include audience, effects, and representation as well as technology and surveillance. Students will also learn to apply a variety of theoretical and methodological frameworks in order to analyze television in text and practice.

379B ST: Introduction to Popular Culture

4, 4 Corey

This course traces the study of popular culture in the U.S. Beginning with the advent of mass culture, students will explore cultural studies between the World Wars, the evolution of postwar consumerism, and then focus on the global culture in which we participate today. Students will examine various artifacts of popular culture including advertisements, comics, clothing, toys & games, and other relevant texts from print, film, and television media. Students will study the development of popular culture by applying different methods and theories such as Mass Culture, Frankfurt School, Social Semiotics, and Postmodern approaches.

380A ST: Gender in Popular Music and Dance

4, x Corey

From ballet, big bands and belly dance to pop, punk, and points in between, this course explores issues of gender in popular music and dance. Students will learn to apply critical methods in order to understand how gender is constructed and strategically used in these cultural forms. In analyzing concepts of femininity and masculinity, students will examine how music and dance reflect, create, and contest our understandings of gender and sexuality. From a critical standpoint, this kind of analysis focuses on the tension between the creative potentials for expression and issues of representation and commodification.

380B ST: Rhetorical Study of Kenneth Burke

x, 4 Withycombe

Examines the works of Kenneth Burke, one of the leading thinkers on rhetoric in the twentieth century. Examines Burke's work from contemporary and post-modern perspectives.

380C ST: Body, Gender, Culture

x, 4 Corey

The human body has received a great deal of attention in recent academic, political, and popular debates. While there is no consensus on the "meaning" of the body, it is clearly the central figure in the contest over issues such as sexuality, identity, and even technology. The construction and function of masculinities and femininities frames the exploration of a variety of theoretical, philosophical, and practical approaches to the body. Students will probe the body's fundamental significance in the construction, experience, and understanding of gender, culture, and social relationships. Along with these concepts, students will explore issues of economy, technology, body modification, and transgender issues, as well as the body in movement contexts such as the gym and sport.

401, 402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3 Withycombe, Hanson, and Sickels

Studies of rhetorical and filmic issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

487 Rhetoric and Film Criticism

4, x Hanson

Students evaluate diverse forms of communication such as speeches, film, writing, and advertisements using a variety of critical perspectives including NeoAristotlean, author, audience, genre, narrative, cultural, dramatistic, ideological, gender, semiotics, hyperrealism, power relations, and deconstructionism. Through a series of papers culminating in a lengthy paper, usually the student's thesis, students engage in scholarly writing that utilizes these critical perspectives. The goal is for students to become more articulate in expressing the significant ways in which communication influences people. Open only to and required of junior or senior Rhetoric and Film Studies majors.

491 Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

2, x Sickels

Research and writing of the senior thesis. Open only to, and required of, senior majors.

498 Honors Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

2, x Sickels

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis. Open only to, and required of, senior majors. Prerequisite: admission to honors candidacy.

2008-2009 Rhetoric and Film Studies

Robert Sickels, Chair

James Hanson

Robert M. Withycombe

The department received a new position for the 2009-2010 year in T.V. studies. Interviews were done but at the last minute, due to the financial crisis caused by the Stock Market Crash of 2008, the position was postponed until a future year.

Jim had the 121 course changed to Fundamentals of Debate and students in the course were more required to attend one debate tournament.

Traditionally, the discipline of rhetoric focused on the effectiveness of the spoken or written word as it is driven by the rhetorical situation (audience, purpose, and context). Over the last several decades, persuasive media have expanded well beyond the conventional spoken and written message. The increasing pervasiveness of film, video, TV, and the Internet in world culture has expanded the mission of rhetorical studies. To reflect these advances in technology and understanding, we focus on the uses of language and image to characterize social reality, to debate and confront controversies, and to aid in the transformation of social institutions. Accordingly, the department of rhetoric and film studies is a multidisciplinary program that enriches understanding of the complexity of contemporary communication by providing a solid grounding in the theory, history, production, interpretation, and criticism of a wide variety of written, oral, visual, and filmic texts.

Most rhetoric and film studies courses (except 110, 121, 221, 222, 165, 250, and 360) satisfy humanities distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 110, 165, 250 and 360 meet fine arts distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 240 and 340 count toward the alternative voices distribution requirement. Rhetoric and Film Studies 121, 221, and 222 do not count as distribution requirements and may not be taken P-D-F.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies major:

A minimum of 34 credits in rhetoric and film studies, including 160; one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379, or 380; 487; and either 491 or 498.

Students may substitute up to eight of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the major. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the major.

Senior assessment: All departmental majors will write a substantial thesis during fall semester and will defend that thesis during a one-hour oral examination.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies minor:

A minimum of 20 credits in rhetoric and film studies including one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; and one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379 or 380. Students may substitute up to four of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the minor. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the minor.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4, 4 Fall: Hanson

Spring: Hanson, Withycombe

Speech is one of our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of effective speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Fundamentals of Debating

1, 1 Hanson

Introduction to and participation in debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend classes covering and engaging key debate skills for the first six to eight weeks of the semester, and then participate in one intercollegiate or on-campus tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. May not be taken P-D-F.

160 Introduction to Film Studies

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the historical and theoretical fundamentals of film studies. Representative films will be drawn from a variety of different eras, genres, and countries. Lectures, discussions, tests, and weekly film screenings.

165 Introduction to Filmmaking

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the fundamentals of the visual language and narrative structures of film. Students will collaboratively make their own short films. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160 and consent of instructor. Priority given to rhetoric and film studies majors.

221 Intercollegiate Parliamentary Debate and Speaking Events

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in parliamentary debate and a speaking event throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare for parliamentary debate and a speaking event, practice each week with staff, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete at two tournaments during the semester in parliamentary debate and in one speaking event when offered. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

222 Intercollegiate Policy Debate*

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in policy debate throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare research assignments, engage in practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Topics change yearly. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Race, Class and Gender

x, 4 Hanson

This course seeks to examine the ways in which race, class-, and gender-based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view race-, class-, and gender-based rhetorical practices. This course may count toward the requirements for the gender studies minor and major.

250 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

4; not offered 2008-09

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings.

303 German Film and the Frankfurt School

x, 4 Tobin

In this course, we will review the masterpieces of German-language cinema, beginning with such expressionist works of art as Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Murnau's Nosferatu, Lang's Metropolis, and Sagan's Mädchen in Uniform. We will also study Nazi film, particularly Leni Riefenstahl's work. Among the postwar directors that we study will be Fassbinder, Herzog, and Wenders. Queer German filmmakers such as Praunheim and Treut will receive special attention. The course will conclude with recent critical and popular successes such as Run Lola Run and The Lives of Others. As a critical lens, we will rely heavily on psychoanalytic and Frankfurt School criticism, focusing on writings by Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, and Theodor Adorno. In addition to class meetings, a weekly video screening of approximately two hours is required. All discussion in English. Students taking the course for German credit will be expected to watch the films without subtitles and complete written assignments in German; students taking the course for credit in world literature or rhetoric and film studies will generally watch films with subtitles and write in English. May be elected as German or World Literature 303.

Was not offered as Bob Tobin left the school at the end of the 2007-2008 year.

340 Background of African American

Protest Rhetoric

x, 4 Withycombe

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. May be elected as Politics 349.

350 Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4, x Withycombe

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced through a wide range of cases that made their way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. May be elected as Politics 379.

351 Argument in the Law and Politics

4; not offered 2008-09

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policymaking argument. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380.

352 Political Campaign Rhetoric

4, x Hanson

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly in the current election year. The course will examine advertisements, speeches, media coverage, and debates. Class discussions will center on such issues as: 1) How passive or active is the public in campaigns? 2) What makes an effective and beneficial political advertisement? 3) What is the importance of character versus issues in campaigns? 4) What is a good campaign strategy? 5) How do campaigns target or alienate differing groups? May be elected as Politics 352.

360 Advanced Film

x, 4 Sickels

In this intensive workshop course students will be expected to write, storyboard, direct, shoot, and edit an original film of their own creation. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160, 165, and/or consent of instructor. Priority given to rhetoric and film studies majors.

365 Special Topics: Studies in Film Genre

4

Students will study the cultural influences on the intersection between the pursuit of artistic achievement and commercial rewards as illustrated by the evolution of a specific genre - e.g. musicals, westerns, noir, horror, combat, screwballs, weepies, etc. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Film genre offerings follow.

366 Special Topics: Major Figures in Film

4

An intensive study of a major figure (or figures) in film, ranging from directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, and actors. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers, and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Major figures offerings follow.

366 ST: Major Figures in Film. "Mean Streets and Raging Bulls": The Silver Age of Cinema

x, 4 Sickels

In tracing film history from the demise of the studio system in the late 1960s to its rebirth in the early 1980s, students in this course will study the all too brief era known as the American cinema's "silver age," during which maverick film school directors made deeply personal and remarkably influential films. Texts will likely include works by Coppola, DePalma, Friedkin, Altman, Allen, Polanski, Bogdanovich, Kubrick, Malick, and Scorsese. Lectures, discussions, a big research paper, an oral presentation, and a required weekly film screening.

368 Special Topics: World Cinema

4

National cinemas not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from early times to contemporary developments in world cinema. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. World cinema offerings follow.

371 Rhetoric in Early Western Culture

4; not offered 2008-09

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during several of the great periods of Western thought, beginning with the classical conflict between the Sophists and Platonists in Greece, to the emphasis on the liberally educated person in the Roman Empire, the rhetoric of the church in the Middle Ages, and concluding with the study of logic and argument during the Scottish Enlightenment. May be elected as Classics 371.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, 4

Intensive studies in special topics not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from ancient to contemporary times. The current offerings follow.

380 ST: A History of American Public Address

x, 4 Withycombe

Students examine the creation, reception, and impact of American public discourse from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the process of public advocacy as it occurs in significant political and social movements and during important public controversies. Examination of public arguments will allow students to better understand the strategic choices available, the limitations and constraints that face advocates, and the nature of critical responses that resulted. Students will better understand the role of public discourse in American history and the relationship between rhetorical practice and public culture.

401, 402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3 Hanson, Sickels, and Withycombe

Studies of rhetorical and filmic issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

487 Rhetoric and Film Criticism

4, x Withycombe

Students evaluate diverse forms of communication such as speeches, film, writing, and advertisements using a variety of critical perspectives including Neo-Aristotlean, author, audience, genre, narrative, cultural, dramatistic, ideological, gender, semiotics, hyperrealism, power relations, and deconstructionism. Through a series of papers culminating in a lengthy paper, usually the student's thesis, students engage in scholarly writing that utilizes these critical perspectives. The goal is for students to become more articulate in expressing the significant ways in which communication influences people. Open only to and required of junior or senior rhetoric and film studies majors.

491 Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

2, x Sickels, Withycombe

Research and writing of the senior thesis. Open only to and required of senior majors.

498 Honors Thesis in Rhetoric and Film

Studies

2, x Sickels, Withycombe

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis. Open only to and required of senior majors. Prerequisite: admission to honors candidacy.

2009-2010 Rhetoric and Film Studies

Rhetoric and Film Studies

Chair, Fall 2009: Robert Sickels  (on Sabbatical, Spring 2010)

Chair, Spring 2010: Robert M. Withycombe

James Hanson

Anne H. Petersen

Traditionally, the discipline of rhetoric focused on the effectiveness of the spoken or written word as it is driven by the rhetorical situation (audience, purpose, and context). Over the last several decades, persuasive media have expanded well beyond the conventional spoken and written message. The increasing pervasiveness of film, video, TV, and the Internet in world culture has expanded the mission of rhetorical studies. To reflect these advances in technology and understanding, we focus on the uses of language and image to characterize social reality, to debate and confront controversies, and to aid in the transformation of social institutions. Accordingly, the department of rhetoric and film studies is a multidisciplinary program that enriches understanding of the complexity of contemporary communication by providing a solid grounding in the theory, history, production, interpretation, and criticism of a wide variety of written, oral, visual, and filmic texts.

Most rhetoric and film studies courses (except 110, 121, 221, 222, 165, 250, and 360) satisfy humanities distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 110, 165, 250 and 360 meet fine arts distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 240 and 340 count toward the alternative voices distribution requirement. Rhetoric and Film Studies 121, 221, and 222 do not count as distribution requirements and may not be taken P-D-F.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies major: A minimum of 34 credits in rhetoric and film studies, including 160; one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379, or 380; 387 (to be taken fall of junior year); and either 491 or 498.

Students may substitute up to eight of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the major. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the major.

Senior assessment: All departmental majors will write a substantial thesis during fall semester and will defend that thesis during a one-hour oral examination.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies minor: A minimum of 20 credits in rhetoric and film studies including one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; and one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379 or 380. Students may substitute up to four of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the minor. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the minor.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4, 4 Fall: Hanson

Spring: Hanson, Withycombe

Speech is one of our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of effective speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Fundamentals of Debating

1, 1 Hanson

Introduction to and participation in debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend classes covering and engaging key debate skills for the first six to eight weeks of the semester, and then participate in one intercollegiate or on-campus tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. May not be taken P-D-F.

160 Introduction to Film Studies

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the historical and theoretical fundamentals of film studies. Representative films will be drawn from a variety of different eras, genres, and countries. Lectures, discussions, tests, and weekly film screenings.

165 Introduction to Filmmaking

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the fundamentals of the visual language and narrative structures of film. Students will collaboratively make their own short films. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160 and consent of instructor. Priority given to rhetoric and film studies majors.

221 Intercollegiate Parliamentary Debate and Speaking Events

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in parliamentary debate and a speaking event throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare for parliamentary debate and a speaking event, practice each week with staff, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete at two tournaments during the semester in parliamentary debate and in one speaking event when offered. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

222 Intercollegiate Policy Debate*

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in policy debate throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare research assignments, engage in practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Topics change yearly. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Race, Class and Gender

4; not offered 2009-10

This course seeks to examine the ways in which race-, class-, and gender-based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view race-, class-, and gender-based rhetorical practices. This course may count toward the requirements for the gender studies minor and major.

250 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

4; not offered 2009-10

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings.

303 German Film and the Frankfurt School

4; not offered 2009-10

In this course, we will review the masterpieces of German-language cinema, beginning with such expressionist works of art as Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Murnau's Nosferatu, Lang's Metropolis, and Sagan's Mädchen in Uniform. We will also study Nazi film, particularly Leni Riefenstahl's work. Among the postwar directors that we study will be Fassbinder, Herzog, and Wenders. Queer German filmmakers such as Praunheim and Treut will receive special attention. The course will conclude with recent critical and popular successes such as Run Lola Run and The Lives of Others. As a critical lens, we will rely heavily on psychoanalytic and Frankfurt School criticism, focusing on writings by Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, and Theodor Adorno. In addition to class meetings, a weekly video screening of approximately two hours is required. All discussion in English. Students taking the course for German credit will be expected to watch the films without subtitles and complete written assignments in German; students taking the course for credit in world literature or rhetoric and film studies will generally watch films with subtitles and write in English. May be elected as German or World Literature 303.

340 Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

4; not offered 2009-10

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. May be elected as Politics 349.

350 Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4, x Withycombe

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced through a wide range of cases that made their way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. May be elected as Politics 379.

351 Argument in the Law and Politics

4, x Hanson

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policymaking argument. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380.

352 Political Campaign Rhetoric

4; not offered 2009-10

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly the Presidential and to a lesser degree Senate and House races as well as ballot initiatives in the current election year. The course examines the recent history of campaigns, the importance of character and public policy, advertisements, speeches, media coverage, debates, new technologies, demographics, and after the election, implications of the results. May be elected as Politics 352.

360 Advanced Film

x, 4 Petersen

In this intensive workshop course students will be expected to write, storyboard, direct, shoot, and edit an original film of their own creation. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160, 165, and/or consent of instructor. Priority given to rhetoric and film studies majors.

365 Special Topics: Studies in Film Genre

4

Students will study the cultural influences on the intersection between the pursuit of artistic achievement and commercial rewards as illustrated by the evolution of a specific genre - e.g. musicals, westerns, noir, horror, combat, screwballs, weepies, etc. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Film genre offerings follow.

366 Special Topics: Major Figures in Film

4

An intensive study of a major figure (or figures) in film, ranging from directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, and actors. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers, and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Major figures offerings follow.

366 ST: Hollywood Stars

x, 4 Petersen

Who will be remembered as a bigger star: Marilyn Monroe or Angelina Jolie? John Wayne or Brad Pitt? And why? This course will attempt to answer such questions, exploring the historical role and cultural significance of the Hollywood Star. Beginning by situating the emergence of stardom in the early 20th century, we will progress through the "Golden Age" of Hollywood stars and the economics of the "star system," culminating in a consideration changing notion of stardom with the spread of television and paparazzi culture. Case studies will likely include: Rudolph Valentino, Greta Garbo, Humphrey Bogart,

Cary Grant, Sidney Poitier, Will Smith, Julia Roberts, and many others. Lectures, discussion, mid-term, one large research paper, and required weekly screenings.

368 Special Topics: World Cinema

4

National cinemas not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specif‍ic materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from early times to contemporary developments in world cinema. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. World cinema offerings follow.

368 ST: Television and American Culture

x, 4 Petersen

This course explores American culture through an analysis of our central medium: television. Tracing the medium from its origins in radio to its digital future, we will investigate television as a site of identity formation, controversy, political power, and artistic experimentation. The course will also consider television in terms of industrial production and audience reception, including the rapidly changing practices associated with television viewing in the 21st century. Likely texts include: I Love Lucy, Gidget, Cagney and Lacey, Star Trek, The Cosby Show, Beverly Hills 90210, The Simpsons, The Wire, The Daily Show, and Gossip Girl. Lectures, discussion, two papers, mid-term, and required weekly screenings.

371 Rhetoric in Early Western Culture

x, 4 Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during several of the great periods of Western thought, beginning with the classical conflict between the Sophists and Platonists in Greece, to the emphasis on the liberally educated person in the Roman Empire, the rhetoric of the church in the Middle Ages, and concluding with the study of logic and argument during the Scottish Enlightenment. May be elected as Classics 371.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, 4

Intensive studies in special topics not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from ancient to contemporary times. The current offerings follow.

380 ST: Rhetorical Study of Kenneth Burke

x, 4 Withycombe

Examines the works of Kenneth Burke, one of the leading thinkers on rhetoric in the 20th century. Examines Burke's work from contemporary and post-modern perspectives.

387 Rhetoric and Film Criticism

4, 4 Fall: Withycombe; Spring: Hanson

Using a variety of critical theories, this course focuses on the analysis of speeches, film, writing, television, and advertisements. Students give presentations and write papers utilizing these various perspectives. The goal is for students to become more conversant in the many ways they can assess the significant influence communication has in our lives. Open only to and required of junior rhetoric and film studies majors.

401, 402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3 Staff

Studies of rhetorical and filmic issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

491 Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, x Sickels, Withycombe

Research and writing of the senior thesis. Open only to and required of senior majors.

498 Honors Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, x Sickels, Withycombe

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis. Open only to and required of senior majors. Prerequisite: admission to honors candidacy.

2010-2011 Rhetoric and Film Studies

CHANGE: School begins 3-2 teaching load. Leaves the film studies with minimal course offerings forcing Jim as the new chair to request waivers for students completing their majors. Bob (Robert Withycombe) announces that he will retire at the end of the year.

Chair: James Hanson

Robert Sickels

Robert M. Withycombe

Traditionally, the discipline of rhetoric focused on the effectiveness of the spoken or written word as it is driven by the rhetorical situation (audience, purpose, and context). Over the last several decades, persuasive media have expanded well beyond the conventional spoken and written message. The increasing pervasiveness of film, video, TV, and the Internet in world culture has expanded the mission of rhetorical studies. To reflect these advances in technology and understanding, we focus on the uses of language and image to characterize social reality, to debate and confront controversies, and to aid in the transformation of social institutions. Accordingly, the department of rhetoric and film studies is a multidisciplinary program that enriches understanding of the complexity of contemporary communication by providing a solid grounding in the theory, history, production, interpretation, and criticism of a wide variety of written, oral, visual, and filmic texts.

Most rhetoric and film studies courses (except 110, 121, 221, 222, 165, 250, and 360) satisfy humanities distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 110, 165, 250 and 360 meet fine arts distribution requirements. Rhetoric and Film Studies 240 and 340 count toward the alternative voices distribution requirement. Rhetoric and Film Studies 121, 221, and 222 do not count as distribution requirements and may not be taken P-D-F.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies major: A minimum of 34 credits in rhetoric and film studies, including 160; one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379, or 380; 387 (to be taken fall of junior year); and either 491 or 498.

Students may substitute up to eight of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the major. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the major.

Senior assessment: All departmental majors will write a substantial thesis during fall semester and will defend that thesis during a one-hour oral examination.

The Rhetoric and Film Studies minor: A minimum of 20 credits in rhetoric and film studies including one of either 365, 366, 367 or 368; and one of either 240, 250, 340, 350, 351, 352, 371, 379 or 380. Students may substitute up to four of the elective credits with approved rhetoric and film courses (e.g., transfer credits, and/or credits from other Whitman departments). Students may not count more than four credits of 121, 221, or 222 toward the minor. Department policy does not allow a P-D-F grade option for courses within the minor.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

x, 4 Hanson

Speech is one of our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of effective speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Fundamentals of Debating

1, x Hanson

Introduction to and participation in debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend classes covering and engaging key debate skills for the first six to eight weeks of the semester, and then participate in one intercollegiate or on-campus tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. May not be taken P-D-F.

160 Introduction to Film Studies

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the historical and theoretical fundamentals of film studies. Representative films will be drawn from a variety of different eras, genres, and countries. Lectures, discussions, tests, and weekly film screenings.

165 Introduction to Filmmaking

4, x Sickels

This course introduces the fundamentals of the visual language and narrative structures of film. Students will collaboratively make their own short films. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160 and consent of instructor. Priority given to rhetoric and film studies majors.

221 Intercollegiate Parliamentary Debate and Speaking Events

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in parliamentary debate and a speaking event throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare for parliamentary debate and a speaking event, practice each week with staff, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete at two tournaments during the semester in parliamentary debate and in one speaking event when offered. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

222 Intercollegiate Policy Debate*

2, 2 Hanson

Participation in policy debate throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a preparation session the week before school begins (exceptions on a case-by-case basis only). Students are expected to attend meetings, prepare research assignments, engage in practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Topics change yearly. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. May not be taken P-D-F.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Race, Class and Gender

x, 4 Hanson

This course seeks to examine the ways in which race-, class-, and gender-based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view race-, class-, and gender-based rhetorical practices. This course may count toward the requirements for the gender studies minor and major.

250 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

4, x Withycombe

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings.

303 German Film and the Frankfurt School

4; not offered 2010-11

In this course, we will review the masterpieces of German-language cinema, beginning with such expressionist works of art as Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Murnau's Nosferatu, Lang's Metropolis, and Sagan's Mädchen in Uniform. We will also study Nazi film, particularly Leni Riefenstahl's work. Among the postwar directors that we study will be Fassbinder, Herzog, and Wenders. Queer German filmmakers such as Praunheim and Treut will receive special attention. The course will conclude with recent critical and popular successes such as Run Lola Run and The Lives of Others. As a critical lens, we will rely heavily on psychoanalytic and Frankfurt School criticism, focusing on writings by Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, and Theodor Adorno. In addition to class meetings, a weekly video screening of approximately two hours is required. All discussion in English. Students taking the course for German credit will be expected to watch the films without subtitles and complete written assignments in German; students taking the course for credit in world literature or rhetoric and film studies will generally watch films with subtitles and write in English. May be elected as German 303 or World Literature 303.

325 Imagining Community through Contemporary Japanese Fiction and Film

4, x Shigeto

In this course we will explore selected works of Japanese fiction and film created during the "postmodern" period (from 1980 to the present.) During this period, the sense of belonging to a traditional community such as nation and family is said to have weakened - or perhaps dissipated altogether - in Japan. The overarching question we engage with is what kinds of different communities and subjectivities are imagined in and through literary and filmic texts during this period. Hence, we will not treat these works merely as representations of contemporary Japanese society but also as the sites where creative efforts to imagine different forms of community are unfolding. We will conduct close readings of each literary and filmic text and examine their varying functions within their socio-historical context particularly the economic bubble and subsequent recession. In order to do a contextual reading, along with assigned fiction and filmic texts, we will read works from such fields as cultural studies, anthropology, and critical theory. In so doing, students will be expected to constantly question their assumptions about contemporary Japanese culture and society. May be elected as World Literature 325.

340 Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

x, 4 Withycombe

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. May be elected as Politics 349.

350 Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4, x Withycombe

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced through a wide range of cases that made their way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. May be elected as Politics 379.

351 Argument in the Law and Politics

4; not offered 2010-11

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policymaking argument. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380.

352 Political Campaign Rhetoric

4; not offered 2010-11

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly the Presidential and to a lesser degree Senate and House races as well as ballot initiatives in the current election year. The course examines the recent history of campaigns, the importance of character and public policy, advertisements, speeches, media coverage, debates, new technologies, demographics, and after the election, implications of the results. May be elected as Politics 352.

360 Advanced Film Making

x, 4 Sickels

In this intensive workshop course students will be expected to write, storyboard, direct, shoot, and edit an original film of their own creation. Extensive lab time required. Prerequisites: successful completion of Rhetoric and Film Studies 160, 165, and/or consent of instructor. Priority given to rhetoric and film studies majors.

365 Special Topics: Studies in Film Genre

4

Students will study the cultural influences on the intersection between the pursuit of artistic achievement and commercial rewards as illustrated by the evolution of a specific genre - e.g., musicals, westerns, noir, horror, combat, screwballs, weepies, etc. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Film genre offerings follow.

366 Special Topics: Major Figures in Film

4

An intensive study of a major figure (or figures) in film, ranging from directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, and actors. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers, and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. Major figures offerings follow.

368 Special Topics: World Cinema

4

National cinemas not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specif‍ic materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from early times to contemporary developments in world cinema. Lectures, discussions, tests, papers and weekly film screenings. May be repeated for credit. World cinema offerings follow.

369 Major Figures in Film: "Mean Streets and Raging Bulls": The Silver Age of Cinema

4; not offered 2010-11

In tracing film history from the demise of the studio, students in this course will study the all too brief era known as the American cinema's "silver age," during which maverick film school directors made deeply personal and remarkably influential films. Texts will likely include works by Coppola, DePalma, Friedkin, Altman, Allen, Polanski, Bogdanovich, Kubrick, Malick and Scorsese. Lectures, discussions, a big research paper, an oral presentation, and weekly film screenings.

371 Rhetoric in Early Western Culture

4; not offered 2010-11

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during several of the great periods of Western thought, beginning with the classical conflict between the Sophists and Platonists in Greece, to the emphasis on the liberally educated person in the Roman Empire, the rhetoric of the church in the Middle Ages, and concluding with the study of logic and argument during the Scottish Enlightenment. May be elected as Classics 371.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, 4

Intensive studies in special topics not generally considered in other courses offered by the department. The specific materials will vary from semester to semester and may cover subjects from ancient to contemporary times. The current offerings follow.

387 Rhetoric and Film Criticism

4, x Hanson

Using a variety of critical theories, this course focuses on the analysis of speeches, film, writing, television, and advertisements. Students give presentations and write papers utilizing these various perspectives. The goal is for students to become more conversant in the many ways they can assess the significant influence communication has in our lives. Open only to and required of junior rhetoric and film studies majors.

388 History of American Public Address

x, 4 Withycombe

Students examine the creation, reception, and impact of American public discourse from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the process of public advocacy as it occurs in significant political and social movements and during important public controversies. Examination of public arguments will allow students to better understand the strategic choices available, the limitations and constraints that face advocates, and the nature of critical responses that resulted. Students will better understand the role of of public discourse in American history and the relationship between rhetorical practice and public culture.

401, 402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3 Staff

Studies of rhetorical and filmic issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

491 Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, x Staff

Research and writing of the senior thesis. Open only to and required of senior majors.

498 Honors Thesis in Rhetoric and Film Studies

4, x Staff

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis. Open only to and required of senior majors. Prerequisite: admission to honors candidacy. Students wishing to be considered for honors must apply to the department within the first six weeks of spring semester of the junior year.