1997-1998 Rhetoric and Public Address

CHANGE: The department's name is changed from Speech to Rhetoric and Public Address. A minor is now offered. Marilee Mifsud, Johnstone visiting professor, offers multiple courses in classical rhetoric including Greek Rhetoric, Roman Rhetoric, Rhetoric revisited (comparing post-modern rhetoric with Greek rhetoric). The political campaign course is dropped. Rhetorical exploration: race, gender, and class is added and is cross listed with gender studies.

Robert M. Withycombe, Chair Marillee Mifsud (Visiting Johnston Professor) James Hanson

Courses treat Rhetoric and Public Address as a liberal art, proposing that such communication is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the communicator's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

The Rhetoric or Public Address minor. A minimum of twenty credits in Rhetoric and Public Address that consists of course work in the following areas of study: (A) an eight credit Performance requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 110 or four credits of Rhetoric 221 or 222, and either Rhetoric 210 or 270; (B) a four credit History requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 370 or the equivalent; (C) a two course Criticism requirement to be satisfied from among the Rhetoric 240, 379 or 380 courses. Minor modifications in this program may be made with the approval of the department.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address 4,4 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers are required. Fall and Spring: Hanson and Mifsud.

210 Advanced Public Address x, 4 People need to communicate effectively in order to engage in business, law, academics, and virtually every aspect of daily life. To this end, the Advanced Public Address course provides training in presenting good reasons, defending and responding to others' arguments, and choosing the right words and phrases for constructing arguments. Specifically, the course will cover advanced speaking skills, debate, and analysis of famous instances of communication. Quizzes, final examination, term paper and oral presentations are required. Spring: Withycombe.

221 Public Address in Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of Parliamentary debate. Students are expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 221 and 222. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

222 Debating in Intercollegiate Forensics* 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared C.E.D.A. forms of debate. Students are expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare at least three research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students are encouraged but not required to compete in an individual speaking event. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 221 and 222. *Title and topics change each semester. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Gender, Class and Race x, 4 This course seeks to examine the ways in which gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations are required. Spring: Hanson.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements 4, x Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Two lecture- discussion presentation periods per week. Fall: Withycombe.

370 Seminar: Survey of Western Rhetorical Theory 4; not offered 1997-98 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principle rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the 17th to the 19th century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of 20th century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Not offered 1997-98.

379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Public Address 4,4 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings follow.

379A Special Topics: Freedom of Speech 4, not offered 1997-98 Arguments over the "appropriate" boundaries of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law, to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. Not offered 1997-98.

380A Special Topics: Background of African-American 4, not offered 1997-98 Protest Rhetoric In this course students will examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Open to all students. Not offered 1997-98.

380B Special Topics: Critiquing Communication 4, not offered 1997-98 This course emphasizes the evaluation of political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. Questions raised include: How persuasive was the President's State of the Union address? Was a recent television advertisement misleading? Did a hit movie reinforce negative gender stereotypes? The course should enable students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which communication influences people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral and written messages, and to develop scholarly Writing skills. To that end, students learn theories of communication criticism from a variety of perspectives including metaphor, ideology, values, masons, and gender relations and apply those theories to types of communication. Quizzes, several papers leading to a final term paper, and a final examination are required. Not offered..

380 Argument in the Law, Politics and Society 4; People use arguments in many forums and this course should enable students to (1) appreciate the nature, functions, forms, and contexts of argumentation as a social, humanistic, rhetorical and communicative activity; (2) improve their ability to construct, present, and defend sound arguments on important contemporary issues; (3) improve their ability to critically analyze and evaluate the arguments of others. In the course, students learn and apply argumentation theory in a variety of contexts. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations am required. Fall Hanson.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe and Hanson and Mifsud.

1998-1999 Rhetoric and Public Address

CHANGE: The description of the minor is changed to avoid confusion about what is a history and what is a criticism course. Marilee has left and her courses are dropped from the curriculum. Rhetoric 121 is added to offer low key involvement with the forensics team though it did not appear in the catalogue. Rhetoric 380 Critiquing Communication is renamed Rhetorical Criticism again. The department moved to the Hunter Conservatory (formerly the Conservatory of Music). A high tech public speaking room, Hunter 107, is used. The forensics team gets two rooms with computers, scanners and printers for use plus a practice room and a cove for their heavy tubs of briefs. These are Hunter 307, 306, practice room 305, rhetoric seminar room 304, bob's office 303, jim's office 308, "the cove" for debate tubs was hunter 310.

Courses treat Rhetoric and Public Address as a liberal art, proposing that such communication is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the communicator's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

The Rhetoric or Public Address minor: A minimum of twenty credits in Rhetoric and Public Address that consists of course work in two areas of study: (A) a four credit Performance requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 110, 210, or four credits of Rhetoric 221 or 222; (B) a sixteen credit Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 240, 270, 370, 379, and 380. Up to four credits of departmentally approved Rhetoric 401 and 402 may be taken to satisfy the Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement. Minor modifications in this program may be made with the approval of the department.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address 4,4 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers are required. Fall and Spring: Hanson; Fall Withycombe.

210 Advanced Public Address x, 4 People need to communicate effectively in order to engage in business, law, academics, and virtually every aspect of daily life. To this end, the Advanced Public Address course provides training in presenting good reasons, defending and responding to others' arguments, and choosing the right words and phrases for constructing arguments. Specifically, the course will cover advanced speaking skills, debate, and analysis of famous instances of communication. Quizzes, final examination, term paper and oral presentations are required. Spring: Withycombe.

221 Public Address in Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of Parliamentary debate. Students are expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 221 and 222. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

222 Debating in Intercollegiate Forensics* 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared C.E.D.A. forms of debate. Students are expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare at least three research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students are encouraged but not required to compete in an individual speaking event. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 221 and 222. *Title and topics change each semester. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Gender, Class and Race x, 4 This course seeks to examine the ways in which gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations are required. Not offered 1998-1999.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements 4, x Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Two lecture- discussion presentation periods per week. Not offered 1998-1999.

370 Seminar: Survey of Western Rhetorical Theory 4; Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principle rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the 17th to the 19th century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of 20th century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Not offered 1998-99.

379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Public Address 4,4 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings follow.

379A Special Topics: Freedom of Speech 4, Arguments over the "appropriate" boundaries of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law, to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. Fall 1998, Withycombe.

380A Special Topics: Background of African-American 4, Protest Rhetoric In this course students will examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Open to all students. Spring 1999, Withycombe.

380B Special Topics: Rhetorical Criticism 4, This course emphasizes the evaluation of political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. Questions raised include: How persuasive was the President's State of the Union address? Was a recent television advertisement misleading? Did a hit movie reinforce negative gender stereotypes? The course should enable students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which communication influences people, Fall 1999, Hanson.

380 Argument in the Law, Politics and Society 4;

People use arguments in many forums and this course should enable students to (1) appreciate the nature, functions, forms, and contexts of argumentation as a social, humanistic, rhetorical and communicative activity; (2) improve their ability to construct, present, and defend sound arguments on important contemporary issues; (3) improve their ability to critically analyze and evaluate the arguments of others. In the course, students learn and apply argumentation theory in a variety of contexts. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations am required. Fall Hanson.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe and Hanson and Mifsud.

1999-2000 Rhetoric and Public Address

CHANGE: The description of the minor is changed to avoid confusion about what is a history and what is a criticism course. The 210 course, advanced public address, is dropped due to low enrollment. 121 is renamed "practicum" and given a different description to avoid confusion that it is a prerequisite to 221 and 222. Argument in the Law and Politics is the new name for the course and it is now cross-listed in Politics. Rhetoric 370 is divided into Rhetoric 371 Classical and Rhetoric 372 Contemporary. 371 is cross-listed in the Classics department. All course descriptions were slightly revised to fit with a campus wide rewording of the catalog. Independent Study is now split with 401 for Bob and 402 for Jim. Rhetoric 240 is now cross listed with American Ethnic studies.

Robert M. Withycombe, Chair

James Hanson

Courses treat Rhetoric and Public Address as a liberal art, proposing that such communication is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the communicator's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

The Rhetoric or Public Address minor: A minimum of twenty credits in Rhetoric and Public Address that consists of course work in two areas of study: (A) a four credit Performance requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 110, 210, or four credits of Rhetoric 221 or 222; (B) a sixteen credit Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 240, 270, 370, 379, and 380. Up to four credits of departmentally approved Rhetoric 401 and 402 may be taken to satisfy the Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement. Minor modifications in this program may be made with the approval of the department.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4, 4-----Withycombe and Hanson

Speech is our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of good speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Intercollegiate Forensics Practicum

1, 1-----Hanson

Participation in individual events and/or debate without a heavy commitment throughout the entire semester. Students are expected to attend a course overview, and schedule and attend two individual practice sessions. Students without experience also are expected to attend a training session. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at one tournament during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. This course may be repeated for a total of four credits.

221 Public Address in Intercollegiate Forensics

2, 2-----Hanson

The theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of debate. Students are expected to attend weekly meetings, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite.

222 Debating in Intercollegiate Forensics*

2, 2-----Hanson

The theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared forms of debate. Students are expected to attend weekly meetings, prepare research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may be required to compete in an individual speaking event at regional tournaments. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Title and topics change each semester. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Gender,Class and Race

x, 4-----Hanson

This course seeks to examine the ways in which gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations are required. This course may count toward the requirements for the Gender Studies minor. This course may not satisfy both minor requirements.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

x, 4-----Withycombe

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Quizzes, final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required.

371 Classical Western Rhetorical Theory

4, x-----Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought through the sixteenth century. Beginning with the classic conflict between the sophists and Platonists in Greece, through the emphasis on style and the liberally educated person in the Roman empire, the course concludes with the rhetoric of the Church in the Middle Ages. Theorists covered include Gorgias, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintillian, and Aquinas. The course enhances appreciation for the classical roots of the rhetorical tradition. May be elected as Classics 371. This course may not satisfy both departmental and minor requirements.

372 Contemporary Western Rhetorical Theory

x, 4-----Withycombe and Hanson

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that have occurred in the seventeenth century through the advent of the twenty-first century. The course will focus on the British emphasis corresponding to the Age of Reason in the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, the advent of the twentieth century reinvigoration of invention in rhetoric, and conclude with post-modern theorists who challenge conceptions of truth, bringing us full circle to the sophist-Platonist debates raised in the Classical course. Theorists covered include Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, Perelman, Fisher, Foucault, and Derrida. The course enhances appreciation of contemporary rhetorical theories.

379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Public Address

4, 4

Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings follow.

379A Special Topics: Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4; not offered 1999-00

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. May be elected as Politics 379. This course may not satisfy both major and minor requirements.

379B Special Topics: Rhetorical Criticism

4; not offered 1999-00

Emphasizes the evaluation of political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. The course enables students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which communication influences people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral and written messages, and to develop scholarly writing skills. Students learn a variety of critical perspectives including Neo-Aristotlean, author, metaphor, ideology, and gender relations and apply those theories to instances of communication. Quizzes, several papers leading to a final term paper, and a final examination are required.

380 Argument in the Law and Politics

4, x-----Hanson

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policy-making processes. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380. This course may not satisfy both major and minor requirements.

380A Special Topics: Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

4; not offered 1999-00

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early seventeenth century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations required. Open to all students.

380B Special Topics: Rhetorical Study of Kenneth Burke

4; not offered 1999-00

Examines the works of Kenneth Burke, one of the leading thinkers on rhetoric in the twentieth century. Examines Burke's work from contemporary and post-modern perspectives. Quizzes, final examination, two short papers, and oral presentations are required.

401,402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3-----Withycombe and Hanson

Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

2000-2001 Rhetoric and Public Address

Robert M. Withycombe, Chair

James Hanson

Courses treat rhetoric and public address as a liberal art, proposing that such communication is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the communicator's understanding of the nature of the communicative act.

The Rhetoric and Public Address minor:

A minimum of twenty credits in Rhetoric and Public Address that consists of course work in two areas of study: (A) a four credit Performance requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 110, 221, or 222; (B) a sixteen credit Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 240, 270, 371, 372, 379, and 380. Up to four credits of departmentally approved Rhetoric 401 and 402 may be taken to satisfy the Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement. Minor modifications in this program may be made with the approval of the department.

Note: In distribution requirements 121, 221 and 222 do not count for distribution in the Language, Writing and Rhetoric area.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4, 4 Withycombe and Hanson

Speech is our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of good speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Intercollegiate Forensics Practicum

1, 1 Hanson

Participation in individual events and/or debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a course overview; schedule and attend practice sessions for the first four to six weeks of the semester; and participate in the team practicum and then either one intercollegiate tournament or the intramural debate tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

221 Public Address in Intercollegiate

Forensics

2, 2 Hanson

The theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of debate. Students are expected to attend weekly meetings, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of three speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

222 Debating in Intercollegiate Forensics*

2, 2 Hanson

The theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared forms of debate. Students are expected to attend weekly meetings, prepare research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may be required to compete in an individual speaking event at regional tournaments. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Title and topics change each year. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Gender, Class and Race

x, 4 Hanson

This course seeks to examine the ways in which gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations are required. This course may count toward the requirements for the Gender Studies minor. This course may not satisfy both minor requirements.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

x, 4 Withycombe

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Quizzes, final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required.

371 Classical Western Rhetorical Theory

4, x Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought through the sixteenth century. Beginning with the classic conflict between the sophists and Platonists in Greece, through the emphasis on style and the liberally educated person in the Roman empire, the course concludes with the rhetoric of the Church in the Middle Ages. Theorists covered include Gorgias, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintillian, and Aquinas. The course enhances appreciation for the classical roots of the rhetorical tradition. May be elected as Classics 371. This course may not satisfy both departmental and minor requirements.

372 Contemporary Western Rhetorical Theory

x, 4 Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that have occurred in the seventeenth century through the advent of the twenty-first century. The course will focus on the British emphasis corresponding to the Age of Reason in the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, the advent of the twentieth century reinvigoration of invention in rhetoric, and conclude with post-modern theorists who challenge conceptions of truth, bringing us full circle to the sophist-Platonist debates raised in the Classical course. Theorists covered include Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, Perelman, Fisher, Foucault, and Derrida. The course enhances appreciation of contemporary rhetorical theories.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Public Address

4, 4

Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings follow.

379A Special Topics: Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4; not offered 2001-02

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. May be elected as Politics 379. This course may not satisfy both major and minor requirements.


379B Special Topics: Rhetorical Criticism

4; not offered 2001-02

380A Special Topics: Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

4; not offered 2001-02

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early seventeenth century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations required. Open to all students. This course may not satisfy both Politics major and Rhetoric minor requirements.

380B Special Topics: Rhetorical Study of Kenneth Burke

4; not offered 2001-02

Examines the works of Kenneth Burke, one of the leading thinkers on rhetoric in the twentieth century. Examines Burke's work from contemporary and postmodern perspectives. Quizzes, final examination, two short papers, and oral presentations are required.

380C Special Topics: A History of American Public Address

4; not offered 2001-02

Students examine the creation, reception, and impact of American public discourse from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the process of public advocacy as it occurs in significant political and social movements and during important public controversies. Examination of public arguments will allow students to better understand the strategic choices available, the limitations and constraints that face advocates, and the nature of critical responses that resulted. Students will better understand the role of public discourse in American history and the relationship between rhetorical practice and public culture. Open to all students. This course may not satisfy both Politics major and Rhetoric minor requirements.

380D Special Topics: Political Campaign Rhetoric

4; not offered 2001-02

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly in the 2000 election. The course will examine advertisements, speeches, and media coverage, using a variety of communication theories. Class discussions will center on such issues as: 1) How passive or active is the public in campaigns? 2) What makes an effective and beneficial political advertisement? 3) What is the importance of character versus issues in campaigns? 4) What is a good campaign strategy? 5) How do campaigns target or alienate different racial, gender, and regional groups? Quizzes, a final examination, projects, a paper, and oral presentations are required.

380E Special Topics: Argument in the Law and Politics

4, x Hanson

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policy-making processes. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380. This course may not satisfy both Politics major and Rhetoric minor requirements.

401, 402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3 Withycombe and Hanson

Studies of rhetorical issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

2001-02 Rhetoric and Public Address

No changes of note were made this year.

Robert M. Withycombe, Chair

James Hanson

Courses treat rhetoric and public address as a liberal art, proposing that such communication is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the communicator's understanding of the nature of the communicative act.

The Rhetoric and Public Address minor:

A minimum of twenty credits in Rhetoric and Public Address that consists of course work in two areas of study: (A) a four credit Performance requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 110, 221, or 222; (B) a sixteen credit Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement to be satisfied through Rhetoric 240, 270, 371, 372, 379, and 380. Up to four credits of departmentally approved Rhetoric 401 and 402 may be taken to satisfy the Theory, Criticism, and Case Study requirement. Minor modifications in this program may be made with the approval of the department.

Note: In distribution requirements 121, 221 and 222 do not count for distribution in the Language, Writing and Rhetoric area.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address

4, 4 Withycombe and Hanson

Speech is our primary means of communication. This course provides training in the fundamentals of good speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers required.

121 Intercollegiate Forensics Practicum

1, 1 Hanson

Participation in individual events and/or debate without a heavy commitment throughout the semester. Students are expected to attend a course overview; schedule and attend practice sessions for the first four to six weeks of the semester; and participate in the team practicum and then either one intercollegiate tournament or the intramural debate tournament. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

221 Public Address in Intercollegiate Forensics

2, 2 Hanson

The theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of debate. Students are expected to attend weekly meetings, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of three speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

222 Debating in Intercollegiate Forensics*

2, 2 Hanson

The theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared forms of debate. Students are expected to attend weekly meetings, prepare research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester. Students may be required to compete in an individual speaking event at regional tournaments. Students may not jointly register for Rhetoric 121, 221, 222. *Title and topics change each year. Rhetoric 121 is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

240 Rhetorical Explorations: Gender, Class and Race

x, 4 Hanson

This course seeks to examine the ways in which gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices can and do create, reinforce, adjust and sometimes overcome inequality in society. The nature of this inequality is addressed as a rhetorical construct that continues to serve as a basis for often heated discussion in society. Those in the class critique communication in the media, daily discourse, the law, politics, and in their own experiences. The goal of this examination is to increase awareness of inequity in communication, to challenge theoretical assumptions about what constitutes inequity, and to offer new perspectives from which to view gender, class, and race based rhetorical practices. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations are required. This course may count toward the requirements for the Gender Studies minor. This course may not satisfy both minor requirements.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements

x, 4 Withycombe

Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion. The study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students are expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Quizzes, final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required.

371 Classical Western Rhetorical Theory

4, x Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought through the sixteenth century. Beginning with the classic conflict between the sophists and Platonists in Greece, through the emphasis on style and the liberally educated person in the Roman empire, the course concludes with the rhetoric of the Church in the Middle Ages. Theorists covered include Gorgias, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintillian, and Aquinas. The course enhances appreciation for the classical roots of the rhetorical tradition. May be elected as Classics 371. This course may not satisfy both departmental and minor requirements.

372 Contemporary Western Rhetorical Theory

x, 4 Withycombe

Focuses on the principal rhetorical developments that have occurred in the seventeenth century through the advent of the twenty-first century. The course will focus on the British emphasis corresponding to the Age of Reason in the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, the advent of the twentieth century reinvigoration of invention in rhetoric, and conclude with post-modern theorists who challenge conceptions of truth, bringing us full circle to the sophist-Platonist debates raised in the Classical course. Theorists covered include Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, Perelman, Fisher, Foucault, and Derrida. The course enhances appreciation of contemporary rhetorical theories.

379, 380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Public Address

4, 4

Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings follow.

379A Special Topics: Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment

4; not offered 2001-02

Arguments over the "appropriate boundaries" of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. May be elected as Politics 379. This course may not satisfy both major and minor requirements.

379B Special Topics: Rhetorical Criticism

4; not offered 2001-02

Emphasizes the evaluation of political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. The course enables students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which communication influences people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral and written messages, and to develop scholarly writing skills. Students learn a variety of critical perspectives including Neo-Aristotlean, author, metaphor, ideology, and gender relations and apply those theories to instances of communication. Quizzes, several papers leading to a final term paper, and a final examination are required.

380A Special Topics: Background of African American Protest Rhetoric

4; not offered 2001-02

Students examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric of the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early seventeenth century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations required. Open to all students. This course may not satisfy both Politics major and Rhetoric minor requirements.

380B Special Topics: Rhetorical Study of Kenneth Burke

4; not offered 2001-02

Examines the works of Kenneth Burke, one of the leading thinkers on rhetoric in the twentieth century. Examines Burke's work from contemporary and postmodern perspectives. Quizzes, final examination, two short papers, and oral presentations are required.

380C Special Topics: A History of American Public Address

4; not offered 2001-02

Students examine the creation, reception, and impact of American public discourse from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the process of public advocacy as it occurs in significant political and social movements and during important public controversies. Examination of public arguments will allow students to better understand the strategic choices available, the limitations and constraints that face advocates, and the nature of critical responses that resulted. Students will better understand the role of public discourse in American history and the relationship between rhetorical practice and public culture. Open to all students. This course may not satisfy both Politics major and Rhetoric minor requirements.

380D Special Topics: Political Campaign Rhetoric

4; not offered 2001-02

This course focuses on communication used in political campaigns, particularly in the 2000 election. The course will examine advertisements, speeches, and media coverage, using a variety of communication theories. Class discussions will center on such issues as: 1) How passive or active is the public in campaigns? 2) What makes an effective and beneficial political advertisement? 3) What is the importance of character versus issues in campaigns? 4) What is a good campaign strategy? 5) How do campaigns target or alienate different racial, gender, and regional groups? Quizzes, a final examination, projects, a paper, and oral presentations are required.

380E Special Topics: Argument in the Law and Politics

4, x Hanson

This course emphasizes the study and practice of argument in the law and politics and involves three critical aspects. First, students engage in and evaluate legal argument in important court cases. Second, students participate in and evaluate political campaign and public policy-making processes. Third, students are exposed to argumentation theory as a way of interpreting the arguments they construct and evaluate. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding and appreciation of the use of argument. May be elected as Politics 380. This course may not satisfy both Politics major and Rhetoric minor requirements.

401, 402 Independent Study

1-3, 1-3 Withycombe and Hanson

Studies of rhetorical issues including directed readings and/or approved projects. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.