Speech 1992-1993

CHANGE: Jim Hanson is hired as co-director of forensics. Jim adds a course in rhetorical criticism but it is not included in the Catalogue.

Robert M. Withycombe Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110, 110 Fundamentals of Speech 3,3 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation and effective oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery and criticism of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily fife. Three lecture- discussion presentation period-, per week. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

221, 222 Principles and Practice of Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation and practice of debate and individual speaking events. Intercollegiate forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits; subject to activity credit limitation. One meeting per week, individualized practice, and weekend tournament participation.Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

270 Argumentation and Persuasion x,3 Theory, preparation and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Spring; Withycombe.

370 Seminar: Western Rhetorical Thinking 3; not offered 1992-93 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principal rhetorical developments which occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of twentieth-century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week.

Not offered 1992-93. 379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication 3; not offered 1992-93 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The specific topic will be specified each year the course is offered.

Not offered 1992-93. 401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

Speech 1993-1994

CHANGE: Bob adds a course in Background of African American Protest Rhetoric.

Speech 380, Argument in the Law, Politics, and Society was added.

Speech 379 African American Protest Rhetoric and Speech 379 Free Speech were added.

Rhetorical Criticism was continued but not offered and hence still not included in the Catalogue.

Debate meetings were moved to Olin 343 near to Jim’s office, Olin 328.

Courses now counted for 4 credits each.

Robert M. Withycombe James Hanson Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110, 110 Fundamentals of Public Address 4,4 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation, and effective oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery, and criticism of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily life. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Fall: Hanson and Withycombe; Spring: Hanson.

221, 222 Principles and Practice of Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation, and practice of debate and individual speaking events. Intercollegiate forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits; subject to activity credit limitation. One meeting per week, individualized practice, and weekend tournament participation. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

270 Argumentation and Persuasion x,3 Theory, preparation and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week.

Not offered. 370 Seminar- Survey of Western Rhetorical Theory x, 4 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principle rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the 17th to the 19th century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of 20th century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered win include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week.

Not offered. 379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication 4,4 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings appear below. 379 Special Topics: Freedom of Speech 4; not offered 1994-95 Arguments over the "appropriate" boundaries of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law, to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. Fall Withycombe.

379 Special Topics: Background of African American 4, not offered 1994-95 Protest Rhetoric In this course students will examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Open to all students. Spring 1994.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

Speech 1994-1995 CHANGE: Speech 210, Advanced Public Address was added.. The Argument and Persuasion course is renamed to focus on social movements. Robert M. Withycombe James Hanson Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110, 110 Fundamentals of Public Address 4,4 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation, and effective oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery, and criticism of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily life. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Fall: Hanson and Withycombe; Spring: Hanson.

210 Advanced Public Address 4 People need to communicate effectively in order to engage in business, law, academics, and virtuallyevery aspect of daily life. To this end, the Advanced Public Address course provides training in presenting good reasons, defending and responding to others' arguments, and choosing the right words and phrases for constructing arguments. Specifically, the course will cover advanced speaking skills, debate, and analysis of famous instances of communication. Quizzes, final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Spring: Hanson.

221, 222 Principles and Practice of Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation, and practice of debate and individual speaking events. Intercollegiate forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits; subject to activity credit limitation. One meeting per week, individualized practice, and weekend tournament participation. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements 4, x Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Fall: Withycombe.

370 Seminar- Survey of Western Rhetorical Theory x, 4 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principle rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the 17th to the 19th century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of 20th century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered win include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Spring: Withycombe.

379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication 4,4 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings appear below.

379 Special Topics: Freedom of Speech 4; not offered 1994-95 Arguments over the "appropriate" boundaries of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law, to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required.

Not offered 1994-95. 379 Special Topics: Background of African American Protest Rhetoric 4, not offered 1994-95 In this course students will examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Open to all students.

Not offered 1994-95. 380 Special Topics: Rhetorical Criticism 4, x Rhetorical Criticism is the study and analysis of communication. The course should enable students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which symbols influence people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral and written messages and to develop scholarly writing skills. To that end, students learn theories of rhetorical criticism from a variety of perspectives including metaphor, ideology, values, reasons, gender relations and culture, and apply those theories to political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. Quizzes, several papers leading to a final term paper, and a final examination are required. Fall: Hanson.

380 Argument in the Law, Politics and Society 4, x People use arguments in many forums and this course should enable students to (1) appreciate the nature, functions, forms, and contexts of argumentation as a social, humanistic, rhetorical and communicative activity; (2) improve their ability to construct, present, and defend sound arguments on important contemporary issues; (3) improve their ability to critically analyze and evaluate the arguments of others. In the course, students learn and apply argumentation theory in a variety of contexts. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Fall: Hanson.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

Speech 1995-1996

CHANGE: Bob Withycombe goes on sabattical. Jim teaches 30 person Rhetoric 110 courses to cover the load. 221 and 222 are split up with 221 being for parliamentary debate and individual events; 222 being for policy debate. Minor changes in the wordings of a few courses were also made.

Robert M. Withycombe (on sabbatical leave, 1995-96) James Hanson Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110, 110 Fundamentals of Public Address 4,4 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation, and effective oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery, and criticism of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily life. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

210 Advanced Public Address x, 4 People need to communicate effectively in order to engage in business, law, academics, and virtually every aspect of daily life. TO this end, the Advanced Public Address course provides training in presenting good reasons, defending and responding to others' arguments, and choosing the right words and phrases for constructing arguments. Specifically, the course will cover advanced speaking skills, debate, and analysis of famous. instances of communication. Quizzes, final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Spring: Hanson.

221 Public Address in Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of debate. Students are expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students may not jointly register for Speech 221 and 222. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

222 Debating in Intercollegiate Forensics* 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared forms of debate. Students are expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare at least three research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students are encouraged but not required to compete in an individual speaking event. Students may not jointly register for Speech 221 and 22. *Title and topics change each semester. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements 4; not offered 1995-96 Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week.

Not offered 1995-96. 370 Seminar: Survey of Western Rhetorical Theory 4; not offered 1995-96 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principle rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the 17th to the 19th century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of 20th century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week.

Not offered 1995-96. 379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication 4f 4 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings appear below. 379 Special Topics: Freedom of Speech 4; not offered 1995-96 Arguments over the "appropriate" boundaries of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law, to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required.

Not offered 1995-96. 379 Special Topics: Background of African-American 4; not offered 1995-96 Protest Rhetoric In this course students will examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Open to all students. Not offered 1995-96.

380 Special Topics: Rhetorical Criticism 4; not offered 1995-96 Rhetorical Criticism is the study and analysis of communication. The course should enable students to become more aware of the multiple ways in which symbols influence people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral and written messages and to develop scholarly writing skills. To that end, students learn theories of rhetorical criticism from a variety of perspectives including metaphor, ideology, values, reasons, gender relations and culture, and apply those theories to political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. Quizzes, several papers leading to a final term paper, and a final examination are required.

Not offered 1995-96. 380 Argument in the Law, Politics and Society 4, x People use arguments in many forums and this course should enable students to (1) appreciate the nature, functions, forms, and contexts of argumentation as a social, humanistic, rhetorical and communicative activity; (2) improve their ability to construct, present, and defend sound arguments on important contemporary issues; (3) improve their ability to critically analyze and evaluate the arguments of others. In the course, students learn and apply argumentation theory in a variety of contexts. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations are required. Fall: Hanson.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fall and Spring: Hanson. Speech 1996-1997 CHANGE: Bob returned from sabbatical. Rhetoric 110 description was changed. Political campaign course added. Bob moved his office to Olin 339. Robert M. Withycombe James Hanson Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110 Fundamentals of Public Address 4,4 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speaking including the preparation, presentation and evaluation of a variety of types of communication. Preparation emphasizes the use of clear organization, cogent arguments, and strong and interesting supporting material. Presentation focuses on the use of vocal variety, distinct articulation, presence, gestures, and effective use of oral language. Evaluation encourages students to critique public address, learning to think and express what could make a presentation more effective. Oral presentations and several papers are required. Fall and Spring: Withycombe and Hanson.

210 Advanced Public Address 4,4 People need to communicate effectively in order to engage in business, law, academics, and virtually every aspect of daily life. To this end, the Advanced Public Address course provides training in presenting good reasons, defending and responding to others' arguments, and choosing the right words and phrases for constructing arguments. Specifically, the course will cover advanced speaking skills, debate, and analysis of famous instances of communication. Quizzes, final examination, term paper, and oral presentations am required. Fall and Spring: Withycombe and Hanson. actually, this course was not offered in 1996-1997

221 Public Address in intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of individual speaking events and extemporaneous forms of debate. Students am expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare for at least two events, schedule and attend individual practice sessions, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whitman hosts. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in a minimum of two speaking events at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students may not jointly register for Speech 221 and 222. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

222 Debating in intercollegiate Forensics- 1-2,1-2 This course involves the theory, preparation, and practice of extensively prepared forms of debate. Students am expected to attend the meeting each week, prepare at least three research assignments, schedule and attend practice drills and debates, and assist in the management of tournaments that Whi truan hosts. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of one tournament during the semester to receive one credit. Students must compete in debate at a minimum of two tournaments during the semester to receive two credits. Students are encouraged but not required to compete in an individual speaking event. Students may not jointly register for Speech 221 and 222. *Title and topics change each semester. Fall and Spring: Hanson.

270 Persuasion, Agitation, and Social Movements 4; not offered 1996-97 Theory, preparation, and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Not offered 1996-97.

370 Seminar. Survey of Western Rhetorical Theory 4; not offered 1996-97 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principle rhetorical developments that occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the 17th to the 19th century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of 20th century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke, and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Not offered 1996-97.

379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication 4,4 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism. The current offerings follow. 379A Special Topics: Freedom of Speech 4, x Arguments over the "appropriate" boundaries of freedom of speech are among the most interesting and hotly debated issues addressed by the legal system. In this course, the evolution of current legal standards on freedom of speech will be traced from the earliest statements on free speech in ancient Athens, through British Common Law, to Colonial America, and finally to a wide range of cases that made their way to the United States Supreme Court. Issues such as privacy, obscenity, "fighting words," and commercial speech will be discussed, along with considerable discussion dealing with special issues of free speech such as free speech and fair trials, prior restraint, and free speech in prisons, schools, the military, and the marketplace. In addition to student participation, papers, projects, and examinations will be required. Fall: Withycombe.

379B Special Topics: Political Campaign 1996-Persuading America 4, x This course will focus on the communication used in the 1996 National Political Campaign. The course will examine advertisements, speeches, media coverage, and key issues raised by the campaign using a variety of communication theories. Class discussions will center on such issues as the role of the public in campaigns, "n-dsleading" advertisements, the importance of character versus issues in campaigns, and the role of polling in the process. The goal of the course is to learn more about how communication works in a campaign. Quizzes, a final examination, papers, and oral presentations are required. Fall: Hanson.

380A Special Topics: Background of African-American x, 4 Protest Rhetoric In this course students will examine the conflicting strategies of assimilation, separation, and revolution, and the rhetoric the civil rights movement used to promote and attack these strategies. Various stages of the social movement will be examined, with a primary focus on the nature of public argument about blacks in America beginning with the arrival of the first Africans in the early 17th century and ending with the era of vigorous African American protest in about 1965. Mid-semester and final examination, term paper, and oral presentations are required. Open to all students. Spring: Withycombe. 380B Special Topics: Critiquing Communication x, 4 This course emphasizes the evaluation of political, social, legal, and interpersonal instances of communication. Questions raised include: How persuasive was the President's State of the Union address? Was a recent television advertisement misleading? Did a hit movie reinforce negative gender stereotypes? The course should enable students to become mom aware of the multiple ways in which communication influences people, to develop a variety of critical perspectives from which to view oral and written messages, and to develop scholarly Writing skills. To that end, students learn theories of communication criticism from a variety of perspectives including metaphor, ideology, values, masons, and gender relations and apply those theories to types of communication. Quizzes, several papers leading to a final term paper, and a final examination are required. Spring: Hanson.

380 Argument in the Law, Politics and Society 4; not offered 1996-97 People use arguments in many forums and this course should enable students to (1) appreciate the nature, functions, forms, and contexts of argumentation as a social, humanistic, rhetorical and communicative activity; (2) improve their ability to construct, present, and defend sound arguments on important contemporary issues; (3) improve their ability to critically analyze and evaluate the arguments of others. In the course, students learn and apply argumentation theory in a variety of contexts. Quizzes, final examination, two short term papers, and oral presentations am required. Not offered 1996-97.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe and Hanson.