Bob teaching circa 1980s.

Bob Withycombe

Speech 1980-1981

Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgement that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts. (See Credit Restrictions.)

CHANGES: Bob Withycombe took over the department at this point. Bob taught the Argumentation and Persuasion course instead of the Articulation course. Joann Rasmussen continued to teach at the college until the end of the 1985-1986 year. She was listed as an instructor in Speech but did not teach any Speech courses.

11,11 Fundamentals of Speech 3,3

Training in the fundamentals of good speech, such as orderly thinking, emotional adjustment, adequate voice, distinct articulation and effective oral use of language. Speech as man's primary means of communication, with emphasis on the preparation and delivery of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily use. Offered both semesters.

14 Fundamentals of Articulation and Phonetics

A scientific study of the sounds of American speech through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet with emphasis on proper articulation, pronunciation and voice production. Optional study of dialects or work in speech therapy for interested students. Second semester only.

43, 44 Principles and Practice of Forensics 3, 3

Olin 221 6:30 p.m. T

Section A was for 1 credit

Section B was for 2 credits

Theory, preparation and practice of debate and/or individual speaking events. Intercollegiate forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Speech 1981-1982

CHANGE: Bob drops the Fundamentals of Articulation and Phoenetics and adds Argumentation and Persuasion

Mr. Withycombe

Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgement that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts. (See Credit Restrictions.)

11, 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3,3 Training in the fundamentals of good speech, such as orderly thinking, emotional

adjustment, adequate voice, distinct articulation and effective oral use of language. Speech as man's primary means of communication, with emphasis on the preparation and delivery of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily use. Offered both semesters. Fall: Mr. Withycombe, section A, 11 M T Th; Mr. Withycombe, section B, 1-2:20 T Th. Spring: Mr. Withycombe; 11 M T n.

36 Argumentation and Persuasion x, 3 Theory, preparation and practice in the art of persuasion will be the central focus of this

course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, language development and memory, psycholinguistics and paralinguistic codes, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of propaganda and advertising, and the structure of arguments. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Spring: Mr Withycombe; 1-2:20 T Th.

45. 46 Principles and Practice of Forensics 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation, and practice of debate and/or individual speaking events. Intercollegiate forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits. Fall and spring: Mr Withycombe, section A (I credit), 6:30 p.m. T; Mr Withycombe, section B (2 credits), 6:30 p.m. T

Speech 1982-1983

CHANGE: Bob adds Seminar on Western Rhetorical Thinking

Robert A Withycombe

Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill lerned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

11,11 Fundamentalsof Speech 3,3 Speech is man's primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fun-

damentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation and ef- fective oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery and criticism of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily life. Three lecture- discussion presentation periods per week. [11] Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

36 Argumentation and Persuasion x,3 Theory, preparation and practice in the art of persuasion will be the central focus of this course.

Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, language development and memory, psycholinguistics and paralinguistic codes, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of propaganda and advertising, and the structure of arguments. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture- discussion presentation periods per week. Offered in alternate years with Speech 370; offered 19&3-84. [361 Spring: Withycombe.

45,46 Principles and Practice of Forensics 1 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation and practice of debate and individual speaking events. Intercollegiate

forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits; sub- ject to activity credit limitation. One meeting per week, individualized practice, and weekend tournament participation. [45, 461 Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

51 Seminar: Western Rhetorical Thinking 3; not offered 1983-84 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principal rhetorical developments which occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of twentieth-century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke and Perelman) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Offered in alternate years with Speech 270, offered 1984-85.

Speech 1983-1984 through 1987-1988

CHANGE: The courses stay the same but the numbers change

Robert A Withycombe

Note: Sean O'Rourke taught courses from 1986-1987 as Bob was on sabbatical finishing his dissertation

Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110,110 Fundamentals of Speech 3,3 Speech is man's primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation and effective oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery and criticism of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily life. Three lecture- discussion presentation periods per week. [11] Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

221,222 Principles and Practice of Forensics 1 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation and practice of debate and individual speaking events. Intercollegiate

forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits; subject to activity credit limitation. One meeting per week, individualized practice, and weekend tournament participation. [45, 461 Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

270 Argumentation and Persuasion x,3 Theory, preparation and practice in the art of persuasion will be the central focus of this course.

Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, language development and memory, psycholinguistics and paralinguistic codes, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of propaganda and advertising, and the structure of arguments. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture- discussion presentation periods per week. Offered in alternate years with Speech 370; offered 19&3-84. [361 Spring: Withycombe.

370 Seminar: Western Rhetorical Thinking 3; not offered 1983-84 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principal rhetorical developments which occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of twentieth-century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke and Perelman) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Offered in alter- nate years with Speech 270, offered 1984-85.

Speech 1988-1989 through 1991-1992

CHANGE: Bob changes some descriptions of each course and a special topics is added though no courses appear to have been offered. Bob's office was in Old Music Conservatory (Room 106 with the classes in Old Music Basement) for a year or two during the Olin addition. At this point, he returned to Olin and was in Olin 183.

Robert M. Withycombe

Courses treat public speaking as a liberal art, proposing that such speaking is not a skill learned by rule but an exercise of judgment that can be no better than the speaker's understanding of the nature of the communicative acts.

110, 110 Fundamentals of Speech 3,3 Speech is our primary means of communication. This course will provide training in the fundamentals of good speech: orderly thinking, adequate vocal variety, distinct articulation and effec- tive oral use of language. Emphasis will be on the preparation, delivery and criticism1 of various types of speeches as well as on the more informal uses of speech in daily fife. Three lecture- discussion presentation period-, per week. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

221, 222 Principles and Practice of Intercollegiate Forensics 1-2,1-2 Theory, preparation and practice of debate and individual speaking events. Intercollegiate

forensics. Students who are debating should register for two credits. Those who are only in individual events will normally receive one credit. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits; subject to activity credit limitation. One meeting per week, individualized practice, and weekend tournament participation. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.

270 Argumentation and Persuasion x,3 Theory, preparation and practice in the art of public persuasion will be the central focus of this

course. Time will be devoted to the study of logic and reasoning, the psychology of persuasion, the ethics of persuasion, the structure of arguments, and persuasion in social movements. Students will be expected to observe, evaluate, and construct logical persuasive arguments in both formal and informal settings. Three lecture-discussion presentation periods per week. Spring; Withycombe.

370 Seminar: Western Rhetorical Thinking 3; not offered 1992-93 Rhetoric, simply defined, is the art and science of persuasion. This course will focus on the principal rhetorical developments which occurred during the great periods of Western thought: the classical world of Greece and Rome; the British period of the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, roughly corresponding to the Age of Reason; and the contemporary era of twentieth-century theorists in Western Europe and America. (Theorists covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Campbell, Whately, I.A. Richards, McLuhan, Weaver, Burke and Perelman.) Students who enroll in this course will develop a broader appreciation for the theoretical literature upon which most contemporary practice is based. Three lecture-discussion periods per week. Not offered 1992-93.

379,380 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication 3; not offered 1992-93 Intensive studies in particular social movements, speakers, or approaches to rhetorical criticism.

The specific topic will be specified each year the course is offered. Not offered 1992-93.

401,402 Independent Study 1-3,1-3 Directed readings leading to the preparation of speeches and/or a critical paper or papers on topics suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student is expected to submit a written proposal to the instructor prior to registration for the study. The number of students accepted for the work will depend on the nature of their study. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Fall and Spring: Withycombe.