Speech 1946-1951

Lloyd Robert Newcomer, A.M. Assistant Professor of English; Northern Illinois State Teachers College; Iowa University; A.B. University of Wyoming; A.M., University of Southern California. Joins the faculty in 1946. He resigned May, 1951.

William Owen Pugh, A.M., Instructor in English, A.B., Whitman College; State University of Iowa; A.M., College of the Pacific; joins the faculty in 1946; teaches speech courses; probably ended in 1949.

Frederick James Hunter, A.M. Assistant Professor of English; Los Angeles City College; A.B. University of California; A.M., University of North Carolina; joins the faculty in 1946; teaches drama and basically replaces EBM Davis; probably ended his time at Whitman in 1950 when Dorothy Crutchfield joined.

Alvin Cline, A.M, (1949; 1950) Assistant Professor of Education and Psychology A.B., Dartmouth College; Ed.M., Boston University; A.M., Columbia University. May have ended in 1950.>

Speech 1952-1954

John Ralph Shepherd, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Speech; San Jose State College; A.B., A.M., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of Southern California. Joined the school in 1952; left in 1954.

Dorothy Marie Crutchfield, M.F.A. Instructor in Speech and Dramatic Art; B.F.A. Oklahoma University, M.F.A., Catholic University of America. Begins in 1950.

Note: in 1921, Whitman became a member of DSR. We switched to Pi Kappa Delta in 1954 when Dean McSloy began coaching.

Speech 1954-1956

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS Whitman College offers a major study in speech in a sequence of courses which is designed to give the student an understanding of basic principles and skills which are fundamental and preparatory to careers in such fields as radio, television, teaching, and other areas of verbal and visual communication. These courses are planned to correlate with the academic work the student may be doing in other courses within the College. Special emphasis is put upon the relationship between speech and English, dramatic art, and the social sciences. In extracurricular activity, there is opportunity for students who may be interested in speech but who are not enrolled in speech classes.

A radio production unit functions on the campus as a service group, and also assists in radio programs produced both on and off the campus. Programs produced by the group are broadcast over local stations, and over stations in other cities.

The College pursues an active program in intercollegiate forensics, and is represented at tournaments by junior and senior varsity squads.

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, debate, speech correction, and history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 55, 56; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

SPEECH

(See Division 11 Major Studies, page 41.)

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Faber Bennett DeChaine (1953-1955)

Note: John Ackley, Intramural Debate Men's Prize; Austin Rice was the Women's Prize; Delta Gamma Prize in Forensics was given out; it was for $60.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. Designed to lay a foundation in the fundamental speech skills common to radio, theatre, public speaking, and interpretation; skills which enter into all speaking and reading; the proper use of the voice, body movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. Required of all major students. Prerequisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Debate, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Frequent speaking before the class is used to illustrate application o fthe principles studied to discussion of problems in the field of reading. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SPEECH 43. Intercollegiate Debate, 1 hour, one semester

A seminar course designed especially for varsity debaters with standing above freshman rank. Maximum credit allowed, three hours.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television in the United States and foreign countries.

SPEECH 72. Radio Production and Direction, 3 hours, one semester The writing, production, and direction of various types of radio

programs. The first half of the course deals with variety, music, news, audience participation, and special events shows. The second half is concerned with drama. Prerequisite: Course 53 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 78. Oral Interpretation, 3 hours, one semester

Basic theories of interpretation. Practice in reading aloud various literary forms, with stress on communication of thought and emo- tion. Prerequisite: Course 11.

SPEECH 80. Voice Science and Phonetics, 3 hours, one semester A study of the human anatomy which is related to the production and reception of sound. Practical application of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite: Course 11 and junior standing.

SPEECH 81. Introduction to Speech Correction, 3 hours, one semester

A course to acquaint students having no special training in speech correction with the more common disorders of voice and articulation, and with what they should and should not attempt in assisting speech defectives. Designed primarily for the prospective teacher. Prerequisite: Course 80 and Psychology 53.

SPEECH 82. Problems in Speech Correction, 2 or 3 hours, one semester

A course in clinical methods using case histories, audio and visual aids, and various corrective procedures in working with speech de. fectives. Prerequisite: Course 81.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the preparation of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

Speech 1956-1958

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS Whitman College offers a major study in speech in a sequence of courses which is designed to give the student an understanding of basic principles and skills which are fundamental and preparatory to careers in such fields as radio, television, teaching, and other areas of verbal and visual communication. These courses are planned to correlate with the academic work the student may be doing in other courses within the College. Special emphasis is put upon the relationship between speech and English, dramatic art, and the social sciences. In extracurricular activity, there is opportunity for students who may be interested in speech but who are not enrolled in speech classes.

A radio production unit functions on the campus as a service group, and also assists in radio programs produced both on and off the campus. Programs produced by the group are broadcast over local stations, and over stations in other cities.

The College pursues an active program in intercollegiate forensics, and is represented at tournaments by junior and senior varsity squads.

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, debate, speech correction, and history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 47, 48; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Arlene Faye DuMond, MFA (1955-); Arlene becomes an assistant professor in 1957

CHANGES: Speech 11 and 12 changed skipping connection to radio and theater. Speech 42 changed from Argumentation and Debate to Argumentation and Persuasion. Speech 43 changed to 43 and 44 with different description and not limited to non-frosh. New Speech 51, Business and Professional Speaking.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prereq- uisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human con- duct. Frequent class speaking. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. Investigation. Evidence and arguments. Briefing and outlining. Refutation and rebuttal. The advocate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, to inform, and to persuade.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Radio play production.

SPEECH 72. Radio Production and Direction, 3 hours, one semester The writing, production, and direction of various types of radio

programs. Variety, music, news, audience participation, special events shows, and drama. Prerequisite: Course 53 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 78. Oral Interpretation, 3 hours, one semester

Basic theories of interpretation. Practice in reading aloud various literary forms, with stress on communication of thought and emotion. Prerequisite: Course 11.

SPEECH 80. Voice Science and Phonetics, 3 hours, one semester A study of the human anatomy which is related to the production and reception of sound. Practical application of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite: Course 11 and junior standing.

SPEECH 81. Introduction to Speech Correction, 3 hours, one semester

A course to acquaint students having no special training in speech correction with the more common disorders of voice and articulation, and with what they should and should not attempt in assisting speech defectives. Designed primarily for the prospective teacher. Prerequisite: Course 80 and Psychology 53.

SPEECH 82. Problems in Speech Correction, 2 or 3 hours, one semester

A course in clinical methods using case histories, audio and visual aids, and various corrective procedures in working with speech defectives. Prerequisite: Course 81.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the preparation of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

Speech 1958-1960

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS Whitman College offers a major study in speech in a sequence of courses which is designed to give the student an understanding of basic principles and skills which are fundamental and preparatory to careers in such fields as radio, television, teaching, and other areas of verbal and visual communication. These courses are planned to correlate with the academic work the student may be doing in other courses within the College. Special emphasis is put upon the relationship between speech and English, dramatic art, and the social sciences. In extracurricular activity, there is opportunity for students who may be interested in speech but who are not enrolled in speech classes.

A radio production unit functions on the campus as a service group, and also assists in radio programs produced both on and off the campus. Programs produced by the group are broadcast over local stations.

The College pursues an active program in intercollegiate forensics, and is represented at tournaments by junior and senior varsity squads.

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, debate, speech correction, and history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 47, 48; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Arlene Faye DuMond, MFA (1955-)

Note: No more Intramural prizes; intramural debate probably stopped during these years. Chester Maxey Award in Intercollegiate Forensics is given annually to a student who has shown distinguished achievement in intercollegiate forensics.

CHANGES: None.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prerequisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human con- duct. Frequent class speaking. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. Investigation. Evidence and arguments. Briefing and outlining. Refutation and rebuttal. The advo- cate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, to inform, and to persuade.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Radio play pro- duction.

SPEECH 72. Radio Production and Direction, 3 hours, one semester The writing, production, and direction of various types of radio

programs. Variety, music, news, audience participation, special events shows, and drama. Prerequisite: Course 53 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 78. Oral Interpretation, 3 hours, one semester

Basic theories of interpretation. Practice in reading aloud various literary forms, with stress on communication of thought and emo- tion. Prerequisite: Course 11.

SPEECH 80. Voice Science and Phonetics, 3 hours, one semester A study of the human anatomy which is related to the production and reception of sound. Practical application of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite: Course 11 and junior standing.

SPEECH 81. Introduction to Speech Correction, 3 hours, one semester

A course to acquaint students having no special training in speech correction with the more common disorders of voice and articulation, and with what they should and should not attempt in assisting speech defectives. Designed primarily for the prospective teacher. Prerequisite: Course 80 and Psychology 53.

SPEECH 82. Problems in Speech Correction, 2 or 3 hours, one semester

A course in clinical methods using case histories, audio and visual aids, and various corrective procedures in working with speech defectives. Prerequisite: Course 81.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the preparation of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

Speech 1960-1962

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS

Whitman College offers a major study in speech in a sequence of courses which is designed to give the student an understanding of basic principles and skills which are fundamental and preparatory to careers in such fields as radio, television, teaching, and other areas of verbal and visual communication. These courses are planned to correlate with the academic work the student may be doing in other courses within the College. Special emphasis is put upon the relationship between speech and English, dramatic art, and the social sciences. In extracurricular activity, there is opportunity for students who may be interested in speech but who are not enrolled in speech classes.

A radio production unit functions on the campus as a service group, and also assists in radio programs produced both on and off the campus. Programs produced by the group are broadcast over local stations.

The College pursues an active program in intercollegiate forensics, and is represented at tournaments by junior and senior varsity squads.

 

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, debate, and history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 47, 48; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Arlene Faye DuMond, MFA (1955-)

Note: No more Intramural prizes; intramural debate probably stopped during these years. Chester Maxey Award in Intercollegiate Forensics is given annually to a student who has shown distinguished achievement in intercollegiate forensics.

CHANGES: Sophomore prerequisites were dropped. Speech 78, advanced radio dropped. Oral interpretation, voice and diction, speech correction were all dropped.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prerequisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human con- duct. Frequent class speaking.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. Investigation. Evidence and arguments. Briefing and outlining. Refutation and rebuttal. The advocate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, to inform, and to persuade.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Various types of radio programs.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the preparation of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

Speech 1962-1964

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS

Whitman College offers a major study in speech in a sequence of courses which is designed to give the student an understanding of basic principles and skills which are fundamental and preparatory to careers in such fields as radio, television, teaching, and other areas of verbal and visual communication. These courses are planned to correlate with the academic work the student may be doing in other courses within the College. Special emphasis is put upon the relationship between speech and English, dramatic art, and the social sciences. In extracurricular activity, there is opportunity for students who may be interested in speech but who are not enrolled in speech classes.

A radio production unit functions on the campus as a service group, and also assists in radio programs produced both on and off the campus. Programs produced by the group are broadcast over local stations.

The College pursues an active program in intercollegiate forensics, and is represented at tournaments by junior and senior varsity squads.

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, debate, and history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 47, 48; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Arlene Faye DuMond, MFA (1955-1962 or 1964)

John Raymond Freimann, MFA joined in Arlene's position in 1962; BS New York University, MFA, Fordham University

Note: No more Intramural prizes; intramural debate probably stopped during these years. Chester Maxey Award in Intercollegiate Forensics is given annually to a student who has shown distingiuished achievement in intercollegiate forensics.

CHANGES: None but a more detailed list of courses asked of Speech majors.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prereq- uisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human con- duct. Frequent class speaking.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. Investigation. Evidence and arguments. Briefing and outlining. Refutation and rebuttal. The advocate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, to inform, and to persuade.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Various types of radio programs.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the prep-

aration of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS

Associate Professor MCSLOY

The student of the speech arts may anticipate an increasing demand for his knowledge and skill both in the teaching profession and in the broad field of communications in general. There is an increasing demand for those with a sound liberal arts background, varied undergraduate courses in speech, and specialization on the graduate level in public speaking, speech and hearing therapy, radio and television, or public address. The ability to direct forensics is a distinct asset.

Telecommunications of the commercial type, and particularly the rapid development of educational television, provide career opportunities. There are also many opportunities in the business and professional areas for who have had in addition to speech concentrated study programs which prepare persons for such fields as business management, personnel work, sales, social work, dramatic art, journalism, law, the ministry, and c service.

RECOMMENDED FoR THE FRESHMAN YEAR

Economics 11, 12, Principles of Economics

Political Science 21, 22, American Political Processes

Psychology 3 Introduction to Psychology

Philosophy 2i, Introduction to Philosophy

Speech 11, 12, Fundamentals of Speech

RECOMMENDED FOR THE SOPHOMORE YEAR

Dramatic Art 47, 48, Play Production or

Dramatic Art 33, 34, Intermediate Acting

English 25, 26, Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

Sociology 3, Introduction to Sociology

Speech 41, Theory and Practice of Discussion

Speech 43, Principles and Practices of Debate

RECOMMENDED FOR THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS

English 79, 80, American Literature

History 61, The Rise of American Industrial Society

History 62, The United States in the Twentieth Century

Psychology 54, Human Growth and Development

Sociology 43, Social Psychology

Religion 52, Christian Ethics

Speech 42, Argumentation and Persuasion

Speech 43, 44, Principles and Practice of Debate

Speech 5 1, Business and Professional Speech

Speech 53, Radio and Television

Courses in dramatic art

Courses in foreign languages

Speech 1964-1966

The intro description of the speech department is gone.

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, and debate. Attention is given also to history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 47, 48; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Dean McSloy becomes full professor in 1964; John Raymond Freimann, MFA joined in Arlene's position in 1962; BS New York University, MFA, Fordham University; Charles David Haller, MFA (1964-?) is added as Assistant Professor of Dramatic Art and Speech; and Acting Director of the Whitman Theatre (1964-65);

CHANGES: Minor wording changes.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prereq- uisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human con- duct. Frequent class speaking.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. investigation, evidence and arguments, briefing and outlining, refutation and rebuttal, the advocate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, information, and persuasion.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Various types of radio programs.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the prep-

aration of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS

Associate Professor MCSLOY

The student of the speech arts may anticipate an increasing demand for his knowledge and skill both in the teaching profession and in the broad field of communications in general. There is an increasing demand for those with a sound liberal arts background, varied undergraduate courses in speech, and specialization on the graduate level in public speaking, speech and hearing therapy, radio and television, or public address. The ability to direct forensics is a distinct asset.

Telecommunications of the commercial type, and particularly the rapid development of educational television, provide career opportunities. There are also many opportunities in the business and professional areas for who have had in addition to speech concentrated study programs which prepare persons for such fields as business management, personnel work, sales, social work, dramatic art, journalism, law, the ministry, and c service.

RECOMMENDED FoR THE FRESHMAN YEAR

Economics 11, 12, Principles of Economics

Political Science 21, 22, American Political Processes

Psychology 3 Introduction to Psychology

Philosophy 2i, Introduction to Philosophy

Speech 11, 12, Fundamentals of Speech

RECOMMENDED FOR THE SOPHOMORE YEAR

Dramatic Art 47, 48, Play Production or

Dramatic Art 33, 34, Intermediate Acting

English 25, 26, Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

Sociology 3, Introduction to Sociology

Speech 41, Theory and Practice of Discussion

Speech 43, Principles and Practices of Debate

RECOMMENDED FOR THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS

English 79, 80, American Literature

History 61, The Rise of American Industrial Society

History 62, The United States in the Twentieth Century

Psychology 54, Human Growth and Development

Sociology 43, Social Psychology

Religion 52, Christian Ethics

Speech 42, Argumentation and Persuasion

Speech 43, 44, Principles and Practice of Debate

Speech 5 1, Business and Professional Speech

Speech 53, Radio and Television

Courses in dramatic art

Courses in foreign languages

Speech 1966-1968

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, and debate. Attention is given also to history of public address.

The major required:

Thirteen hours selected from courses in speech; Dramatic Art 47, 48; twelve hours selected from English 25, 26, 35, 36, 39, 40, 75, 76, 79, 80; three hours selected from History 27, 28, 57, 58, 61, 62, 64. Of the total of thirty-six hours, eighteen must be in courses numbered above 50. Advised: As much additional work in dramatic art as time permits.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); John Raymond Freimann, MFA (1962-1967); Charles David Haller, MFA (1964-?) William Veatch is added in 1967 but doesn't actually begin his appointment until 1968.

Chester Maxey award in Forensics is gone; it now goes to the best politics student.

CHANGES: None.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prereq- uisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human con- duct. Frequent class speaking.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. investigation, evidence and arguments, briefing and outlining, refutation and rebuttal, the advocate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, information, and persuasion.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Various types of radio programs.

SPEECH 85, 86. Senior Honors Course, 3 hours, each semester Designed to further independent investigation leading to the preparation of a required report or thesis. Required of and limited to senior honors candidates in speech.

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS

Associate Professor MCSLOY

The student of the speech arts may anticipate an increasing demand for his knowledge and skill both in the teaching profession and in the broad field of communications in general. There is an increasing demand for those with a sound liberal arts background, varied undergraduate courses in speech, and specialization on the graduate level in public speaking, speech and hearing therapy, radio and television, or public address. The ability to direct forensics is a distinct asset.

Telecommunications of the commercial type, and particularly the rapid development of educational television, provide career opportunities. There are also many opportunities in the business and professional areas for who have had in addition to speech concentrated study programs which prepare persons for such fields as business management, personnel work, sales, social work, dramatic art, journalism, law, the ministry, and c service.

RECOMMENDED FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR

Economics 11, 12, Principles of Economics

Political Science 21, 22, American Political Processes

Psychology 3 Introduction to Psychology

Philosophy 2i, Introduction to Philosophy

Speech 11, 12, Fundamentals of Speech

RECOMMENDED FOR THE SOPHOMORE YEAR

Dramatic Art 47, 48, Play Production or

Dramatic Art 33, 34, Intermediate Acting

English 25, 26, Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

Sociology 3, Introduction to Sociology

Speech 41, Theory and Practice of Discussion

Speech 43, Principles and Practices of Debate

RECOMMENDED FOR THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS

English 79, 80, American Literature

History 61, The Rise of American Industrial Society

History 62, The United States in the Twentieth Century

Psychology 54, Human Growth and Development

Sociology 43, Social Psychology

Religion 52, Christian Ethics

Speech 42, Argumentation and Persuasion

Speech 43, 44, Principles and Practice of Debate

Speech 5 1, Business and Professional Speech

Speech 53, Radio and Television

Courses in dramatic art

Courses in foreign languages

Speech 1968-1970

Speech courses are designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communications and to acquaint the student with the following areas of speech: radio, television, general public speaking, discussion, and debate. Attention is given also to history of public address.

The major in the department ended in 1968.

Associate Professor MCSLOY (1954-1969); Dean McSloy becomes a visiting professor; John Raymond Freimann is no longer connected to the speech department as of 1967. William Horace Veatch joins the faculty in 1968. Charles David Haller is no longer at Whitman at this point.

CHANGES: Honors course is replaced by a foreign study course.

SPEECH 11, 12. Fundamentals of Speech, 3 hours, each semester Adjustment to the speech situation. The basic principles of speech and proficiency in their use. Voice, bodily movement, selection and organization of materials, speaker-listener relationships. The preparation and delivery of speech for the class, and the evaluation of these by group discussion. Required of all major students. Prerequisite for Course 12: Course 11 or consent of instructor.

SPEECH 41. Theory and Practice of Discussion, 3 hours, one semester

The theory and the practice of informal group discussion, panel discussion, the symposium, and the forum. Current problems are studied through discussion techniques.

SPEECH 42. Argumentation and Persuasion, 3 hours, one semester Principles of argumentative discourse and reacting in current

social, economic, and political questions. Motivating human conduct. Frequent class speaking.

SPEECH 43, 44. Principles and Practice of Debate, 2 hours, each semester

The analysis of propositions. investigation, evidence and arguments, briefing and outlining, refutation and rebuttal, the advocate as speaker. Participation in class debates.

SPEECH 51. Business and Professional Speech, 3 hours, one semester A study of business and professional speech situations. Interviews,

conversations, conferences. Reading written reports. Speeches of good will, information, and persuasion.

SPEECH 53. Introduction to Radio and Television, 3 hours, one semester

An historical examination and evaluation of the development and nature of radio and television. Radio engineering. Various types of radio programs.

SPEECH 71, 72. Foreign Study Project, 5 credits each semester.

Research project undertaken abroad in cooperation with the Experiment in International Living. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SPEECH, RADIO, AND RELATED FIELDS

Associate Professor MCSLOY

The student of the speech arts may anticipate an increasing demand for his knowledge and skill both in the teaching profession and in the broad field of communications in general. There is an increasing demand for those with a sound liberal arts background, varied undergraduate courses in speech, and specialization on the graduate level in public speaking, speech and hearing therapy, radio and television, or public address. The ability to direct forensics is a distinct asset.

Telecommunications of the commercial type, and particularly the rapid development of educational television, provide career opportunities. There are also many opportunities in the business and professional areas for who have had in addition to speech concentrated study programs which prepare persons for such fields as business management, personnel work, sales, social work, dramatic art, journalism, law, the ministry, and c service.

RECOMMENDED FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR

Economics 11, 12, Principles of Economics

Political Science 21, 22, American Political Processes

Psychology 3 Introduction to Psychology

Philosophy 2i, Introduction to Philosophy

Speech 11, 12, Fundamentals of Speech

RECOMMENDED FOR THE SOPHOMORE YEAR

Dramatic Art 47, 48, Play Production or

Dramatic Art 33, 34, Intermediate Acting

English 25, 26, Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

Sociology 3, Introduction to Sociology

Speech 41, Theory and Practice of Discussion

Speech 43, Principles and Practices of Debate

RECOMMENDED FOR THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS

English 79, 80, American Literature

History 61, The Rise of American Industrial Society

History 62, The United States in the Twentieth Century

Psychology 54, Human Growth and Development

Sociology 43, Social Psychology

Religion 52, Christian Ethics

Speech 42, Argumentation and Persuasion

Speech 43, 44, Principles and Practice of Debate

Speech 5 1, Business and Professional Speech

Speech 53, Radio and Television

Courses in dramatic art

Courses in foreign languages