February 6

Volume 6, Issue 24
February 6, 2012
The Fountain

Professor G. Thomas Edwards to discuss the evolution of the Whitman faculty

edwardsG. Thomas “Tom” Edwards, William Kirkman Professor of History Emeritus, is among Whitman’s most revered professors, having taught at the college for more than 30 years prior to his retirement in 1998. Next week, Edwards returns to campus to give a talk titled “A Participant in the Evolution of the Whitman Faculty since the 1960s.” His presentation addresses the changing role of the faculty and his personal experience teaching at Whitman over several decades.

This year marks the 20-year anniversary of the publication of Edwards’ acclaimed book, The Triumph of Tradition: The Emergence of Whitman College 1859-1924, for which he received a Washington State Governor’s Award. As a Whitman history professor, Edwards specialized in the American West and the Civil War and received several distinguished teaching awards.

Upon his retirement, his former students established the G. Thomas Edwards Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching and Scholarship. Recent recipients include Ginger Withers, Dr. Robert F. Welty Associate Professor of Biology, Zahi Zalloua, associate professor of foreign languages and literatures, French and Melissa Clearfield, associate professor of psychology.

The event takes place Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 4 p.m. in Olin 130. Light refreshments will be served. Scott Elliott, associate professor of English was the 2011 recipient of the award and will speak the following day, Feb. 15 on the topic of “Creative Writing and the Liberal Arts: Works in Progress.”


Faculty news briefs

bobrow-strain Aaron Bobrow-Strain, associate professor of politics, reports that his new book, White Bread is slated for publication this March through Beacon and will be distributed by Random House. This is his first book aimed at a larger, non-academic audience. It explores how the store-bought loaf of bread went from being an icon of American progress in the early twentieth century to “white trash” now, in a society increasingly concerned with eating local and organic. In the book, Bobrow-Strain offers up a slice of social history, arguing that the ongoing debate over what Americans should eat says a lot about race, class, immigration and gender. Bobrow-Strain credits five generations of Whitman students who took his Whitman in the Global Food System course, as well as two student researchers in particular, Justine Pope ’07 and Robin Lewis ’11, for providing inspiration and intellectual fodder for the book. Students in Advanced Filmmaking also will be creating a book trailer for White Bread. A spin-off piece was recently published in the McSweeney’s magazine The Believer. Click here to read it online.

  yancey
yancey
  Photo credit: University of Aberdeen, UK.

Paul Yancey, Carl E. Peterson Endowed Chair of Sciences, reports that the discovery of a “supergiant” amphipod by a research team including his student, Mackenzie Gerringer ’12, is now making headlines in the U.S. and international media. Gerringer participated in the research expedition to the Kermadec Trench north of New Zealand in December at Yancey’s behest, to conduct research in preparation for his upcoming journey to the Kermadec and Mariana Islands.The research team, led by scientists from the University of Aberdeen and National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, discovered the supergiant amphipod 7 km deep. The amphipod, a type of crustacean, seen on film was 34 cm, and the crew captured a specimen measuring 28 cm, nearly ten times that of a normal amphipod. On his upcoming expedition, Project Hades, to the Kermadec and Mariana Islands, Yancey will deploy the Nereus sub, a remote operating vehicle that can dive 36,000 feet below the sea. Project Hades is partially funded by a $93,891 grant from the National Science Foundation. National Geographic is also interested in shooting a TV special about the expedition.


Harper Joy Theatre invites faculty and staff to audition for Trelawny

hjt logoHarper Joy Theatre and the Department of Music invite Whitman faculty and staff to join students and alumni in auditioning for the U.S. premiere of Julian Slade’s Trelawny, a sparkling romantic musical saluting the performers of a bygone era. Based on Arthur Pinero’s affectionate comic valentine to the theatre of his youth, Trelawny is “an exuberant celebration of the irrepressible urge to make theatre.” As the 1860 season ends, ingénue Rose Trelawny bids farewell to the Wells Theatre company to marry the fashionable young gentleman she loves. Can their romance survive the differences between the gypsies of the Wells and the aristocrats of Cavendish Square?

“This is a huge and wonderful show with lots of roles for people of all ages,” says director Nancy Simon, Garrett Professor of Dramatic Art. “I’d like the whole Whitman community to be a part of this celebration of music and performance that will conclude our first season in our newly remodeled home.”

Auditions will be held Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 7 p.m. in the Hall of Music; rehearsals will begin after spring break. Anyone interested in auditioning should contact Simon at simonnl@whitman.edu or x5292 for more information.


Coming Events
All free unless otherwise noted

Monday, 2/6
Lecture: “Public Intellectuals in China: The Challenge of Influencing Policy from Inside and Outside the Political Establishment.” Visiting educator Timothy Cheek is the Louis Cha Chair of Chinese Research and the Associate Director of the Centre for Chinese Research at the University of British Columbia, and the author of numerous books. 4 p.m. in Hunter Auditorium.

Tuesday, 2/7
Lecture: “The 2012 Presidential Election.” David Domke, acting chair of the department of communications at the University of Washington, shares his perspective on the state of political leadership in this country and his expectations for the 2012 presidential election. 7 p.m. in Olin 130.

Tuesday, 2/7
Lecture: “The Western Paradox: Public Lands, Dependent States and Speaking for the Earth.” Jon Marvel, executive director of the Western Watersheds Project, presents this year’s William O. Douglas lecture. 7:30 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.

Wednesday 2/8-Sunday 2/12
Theatre: HJT One-Act Play Contest. This annual competition invites students to submit original scripts and the audience to judge the performances. Call x5180 for prices and information.

Thursday 2/9
VWRS: The Visiting Writers Reading Series presents a reading by Camille T. Dungy, recipient of multiple awards for her writing and professor in the creative writing department at San Francisco State University. 7 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.

Friday 2/10
Music: The Whitman College Fridays at Four recital series presents a faculty recital with Doug Scarborough, trombone and vocals, Gary Hemway, piano and vocals and guest artist Gary Winston, guitar and vocals. 4 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.

Sunday 2/12
Music: First Year Joint Recital. The music department presents a recital with Maya Abramson, assisted by Melissa Loehnig, piano and Amy Dodds, viola, with works by Mozart, Beethoven Dvorak and Kreisler. 3 p.m. in Chism Recital Hall.

Monday 2/13
Music: Whitman Orchestra Winter Concert. The music department presents the string players of the 2011-2012 season, conducted by Jeremy Mims, with Joshua Melander, violin and Katherine Lee, violin. Works by Vivaldi, Respighi, Stravinsky and André Prévost. 7:30 p.m. in Chism Recital Hall.

Tuesday 2/14
Music: Walla Walla Symphony Concert. 7:30 p.m. in Cordiner Hall.

Tuesday 2/14
Lecture: “A Participant in the Evolution of the Whitman Faculty since the 1960s.” A talk by Tom Edwards, William Kirkman Professor of History Emeritus. He will discuss the changing role of the faculty and his personal experience teaching at Whitman over several decades. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of Edwards’ book, Triumph of Tradition. 4 p.m. in Olin 130.

Wednesday 2/15
Lecture: “Creative Writing and the Liberal Arts: Works in Progress.” Scott Elliott, associate professor of English and last year’s recipient of the G. Thomas Edwards Award gives a brief talk and a reading. 7 p.m. in Olin 130.

Wednesday 2/15
Film: Director Jennifer Maas screens her film Wheedle’s Groove on campus. This feature documentary explores Seattle’s long-lost soul and funk music scene of the 1960s and 1970s, with interview footage, archival materials, original music and live performances. 7 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.

Wednesday 2/15
Lecture: “Living Your Values.” A conversation with life-long activist and community organizer Jim Owens ’66, who now advises community conservation and environmental groups across the Northwest. 7 p.m. in Reid Campus Center, Room G02.

Thursday 2/16
Lecture: “The Nespelem Art Colony in the Allotment Era.” Michael Holloman is a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and director of the Plateau Center for American Indian Studies. He also serves as an associate professor of art at Washington State University. 7 p.m. in Olin 157.

Friday 2/17
Music: The Whitman College Fridays at Four recital series presents “Cello-Piano Favorites” with Edward Dixon, cello and Sheila Gephart, piano. 4 p.m. in Chism Recital Hall.

Thursday 2/23
Music: The music department presents the Spring Composers Concert, with Emily Allen ’11, Mark Arand ’12, Jordan Brown ’14, Ross Eustis ’11, Eric Feldmen ’14 and Peter Qualtere-Burcher ’12. 7:30 p.m. in Chism Recital Hall.

Friday 2/24
Music: The Whitman College Fridays at Four recital series presents the Whitman Jazz Octet performing Standards and Originals. 4 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.

Saturday 2/25
The 2012 Global Studies Symposium: “Places/Peripheries: Intersections of the Global and the Local.” The fourth annual Whitman College Global Studies Symposium hosts distinguished scholars Mike Davis, Simon Gikandi and Carolyn Nordstrom. Read more about this year’s symposium here. 1 p.m. in Maxey Auditorium.

Sunday 2/26
Music: The music department presents A Senior Violin Recital with Rebecca Young, assisted by Jeremy Mims, piano. 3 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.

Wednesday 2/29
Film: Director Bradley Beesley screens his film Sweethearts of the Prison Rodeo on campus. Venture behind prison walls to follow convict cowgirls on their journey to the 2007 Oklahoma State Penitentiary Rodeo in a state with the highest female incarceration rate in the country. 7 p.m. in Kimball Theatre.


Athletic Events – Home Games

Men’s Tennis

Friday, Feb. 10 at 11 a.m. – vs. Louis-Clark State University (Bratton Tennis Center or Outdoor Courts)*

Saturday Feb. 11 at 9 a.m. – vs. University of Montana (Bratton Tennis Center or Outdoor Courts)*

*Dependent on weather


Parting Shot
By Greg Lehman, photographer/communications officer

parting shot

Diligently working away at my computer screen I almost missed this wonderful sunset display above the Walla Walla Valleylast Wednesday evening. Full size.


Whitman College
In This Issue
Thomas Edwards Lecture
Faculty News Briefs
HJT Auditions
Coming Events
Athletic Events
Parting Shot

Past issues
The Fountain

The Fountain is published by the Office of Communications. Send news to thefountain@whitman.edu. Photos are accepted. Submissions are due by Tuesday at 5 p.m. for the following week’s issue. Editor: Gillian Frew. Managing Editor: Ruth Wardwell. Online: www.whitman.edu/fountain