1929-1930 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

No picture available at this time

Mark Harris, Director of Forensics

 

Description: Description: Description: 1926-1927 Davis

With W.R. Davis as DSR advisor.

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Debate

Whitman News

 I. Whitman College in 1929-1930

A. Dr. S.B.L. Penrose was the college president.

B. Wilton Field was the student government president, Helen Graham was the vice-president, and John Joyce was the secretary/treasurer.

C. Whitman had a faculty of 33 people, with two new additions.

1. Mark Harris replaced Angello Pellegrini as the director of forensics.

2. Louise Shafte Blomquist, who joined the college the previous year, became the Dean of Women Students.

D. The Conservatory of Music, located on campus but under a different administration, maintained a faculty of seven.

E. The graduation requirements changed, requiring all students to take a year of a foreign language.

III. At Whitman College

A. The Blue Moon Literary Review was renewed after being cancelled in 1929.

B. Short, curled hair was popular among women.

C. Student fees for ASWC were $7.50 a semester.

D. The Upper Classmen’s Association, formed several years ago as a way to preserve Whitman tradition by torturing first year students, failed. Three students were disciplined by the association, one being dumped in Lakum Duckum.

E. The Arrows, a pep group, was formed by sophomore women to boost school spirit.

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Delta Sigma Rho

 

Speech in the English Department News

 

(1930)

COURSES IN SPEAKING

 

6.Public Speaking.—This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It includes instruction in the principles of oral composition, correction of voice and speech defects, training in right vocal habits, and practice in speaking. Sections are limited to fifteen students. Required of Freshmen. One hour, first and second semesters.

7.Argumentation and Debate.—The aim of this course is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. Students interested in intercollegiate forensics are advised to take this course. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Three. hours, first semester.

108.Forms of Public Address.—The course includes a study of selected addresses prepared for special occasions and practice in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours, second semester.

[30. Extemporaneous Speaking.—Practice in extemporaneous speaking on topics of current interest. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Two hours, first semester. Not given in [1980-1981.]

100.Dramatic Interpretation and Play Production.—In the first semester, this course gives instruction and training in dramatic interpretation; in the second semester, in play production. Open to Juniors and Seniors, and to Sophomores by consent of the instructor. The enrollment is limited to twenty students. Three hours, both semesters.

 

THE JOHN BRINING PRIZES IN EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING. I Mr. John Brining, of Dayton, Washington, offers two prizes, one of twenty and one of ten dollars, to winners in a speaking I contest open to members of the Freshman class. The contest is held during Commencement week. Contestants receive their subjects two hours before they speak. In preparing their speeches they are not permitted to consult any person. (1915)

THE HUGH ELMER BROWN DEBATE TROPHIES have been given by friends in honor of the Reverend Hugh Elmer Brown, D.D., ‘04, of Evanston, Illinois, to promote interest in intramural debating. One trophy is awarded to the best class team of men and women, respectively. (1926)

THE DOVELL—GOSE PRIZES IN ORATORY. Alumni members of the Board of Overseers have established three prizes of $50, $30, and $20 in memory of the late William Thomas Dovell, ‘88, and Christopher Columbus Gose, ‘86, upon the following conditions:

The prizes are awarded upon the basis of an oratorical contest to be held during Commencement week, provided that at least five contestants participate. The contest is open to members of the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior classes. The orations are limited to two thousand words. Contestants present their subjects to the head of the English Department for approval not later than the third Tuesday of February. If more than six contestants submit orations, they present them to the head of the English Department not later than April 15 for submission to a board of judges on thought and composition who select the six best orations for the Commencement contest. The judges on thought and on delivery are selected by a committee consisting of the President of the College and the heads of the departments of English and History.(1918)

 

DELTA SIGMA Rho, national honorary forensic fraternity. has established a chapter at the College. Membership is earned in part by participation in at least two intercollegiate contests.

 

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE, an organization of which every student is a member, has control of student activities in, athletics, journalism, debate, oratory and music. The President, Vice-President and Secretary are elected by the student body and constitute, with the Graduate Manager and Faculty Advisor, the Executive Committee. Meetings are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays during the College year. The dues, $7.50 per semester, payable by every student, are collected by the Bursar of the College.

 

The John Brining Prizes in Extemporaneous Speaking—

First: PAUL LEROY BOLEY, Class of 1932

Second: HELEN FRANCES RUSSELL, Class of 1932

The William Thomas Dovell Prizes in Oratory,—

First: ALBERT HENRY GARRETBON, Class of 1931

Second: CHESTER DALE BABCOCK, Class of 1929

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Dovell Contest

 

World News

II. In the World

A. The U.S. Government decided to revamp the prison system, restructuring its bureaucracy.

B. The depression continued.

C. “Stalin began a policy of "forced collectivization" of farms.”

D. “In 1929, Chile and Peru settled a longstanding border dispute.”

E. “In 1929, the first large-scale attacks by Arabs on Jews took place in Palestine.”

F. The Stock Market crashes.

G. “Trotsky expelled from USSR.”

H. “Lateran Treaty establishes independent Vatican City.”

I. “Edwin Powell Hubble proposes theory of expanding universe.”

J. “St. Valentine's Day gangland massacre in Chicago.”

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Men's Debate

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Men's Debate Cont

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Women's Varsity Debate

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Women's Varsity Debate cont

 

Team News

Men's Debate

The school year 1929-1930 in forensics is marked by an unusual surge of activity and interest. More men turned out for debate this year than ever before. Crowds at debates excelled those of past years. Debating schedules included trips as extensive as Whitman has yet known. The Wrangler's Club has had the most active year of its existence. The enthusiasm and ability of our new coach, Mr. Harris, coupled with the high caliber of the material he has had to work with, have made this year outstanding in forensics. Tile season, was begun with the annual triangular debates with Washington State College and the University of Idaho, in the month of December. At Moscow, Talcott Ostrander and George MacClain debated their way to a decision over the University of Idaho. Vernon Wilkinson and Sidney Cottle were less fortunate at Pullman, for the critic judge decided against them, in spite of Wilkinson's uncanny rebuttal. At home, Albert Garretson and Kenneth Davis successfully defended themselves against the onslaught of Washington State College debaters, easily subduing their opponents for a decision for Whitman. The question argued in these three debates was "Resolved, That the English indictment of American education is justified." It was originated by our own coach and proved to be highly satisfactory. The next debate of the year was one which for some untold reason created extraordinary interest. Despite the balmy, spring afternoon in February, more than a hundred composed the crowd of intent listeners. Paul Boley and Vernon Wilkenson showed their opponents from the University of Utah that the nations of the world should disarm, but because of the fact that the Utah manager had directed his debaters to prepare on the wrong side of the question, it was necessary to make the debate non-decision. W. I. Smithy President of the Walla Walla College, served as the critic judge, making comments upon the debate, but rendering no decision. During the month of March, Clark Emery and George MacClain upheld the affirmative side of the disarmament question against Brigham Young University. Then came the long southern tour, extending over the entire West. The lucky pair were Albert Garretson and Kenneth Davis, On March 19, they left Walla Walla for a three weeks' tour. At Provo, Utah, they took on Brigham Young University, and the next evening they debated the opposite side of the same question against the University of Utah at Salt Lake City. Going down through Denver and El Paso. they arrived in Tucson, Arizona for the conference of the Pacific Forensic League. This League is made up of twelve schools: Washington State College, Stanford University, Whitman College, University of Southern California, University of Oregon, Oregon State College, Willamette University, University of California at Los Angeles, University of Arizona, University of Idaho, Pomona College, and University of Washington. Davis represented Whitman in the oratorical contest and Garretson took part in the extemporaneous speaking contest, Leaving Tucson, they took in California, from Tijuana, Mexico, to the northern boundary, traveling part of the way by boat. They stopped in Corvallis to debate Oregon State College on a different subject, and arrived in Walla Walla just in time for spring vacation.

 

Pacific Forensic League

Whitman sent two delegates to the annual meet of the Pacific Forensic League, which convened this year at Tucson, Arizona. Kenneth Davis and Albert Garretson, who have distinguished themselves in forensics at Whitman were chosen for the trip. Davis took second place in the oratorical contest, speaking against representatives from all the important colleges on the Pacific coast. His oration, "Three Billion Slaves," was termed by the judges to be the "most intellectual contribution in the oratorical division." Garretson, competing in the extemporaneous speaking contest, placed well up in the awards of places, and received commendations for his work. The Pacific Forensic League is an organization of the colleges of the West, which annually meets for intercollegiate competition. Whitman has repeatedly been outstanding in tlie meets, and has shown up favorably against the largest universities. Whitman has sent representatives to the Forensic League meetings for several years, and was given first place in the Extemporaneous division, when Harry Rotlirock represented the Maize and Blue. Davis and Garretson appeared in several debates with coast colleges en route to Tucson, and on the return trip, winning two out of the three decision debates, and appearing well in the non-decision clashes. The debate season this year, according to Mark Harris, coach, has been the most successful and elaborate in years of participation by Whitman teams.

 

Women's Varsity Debate

A debate here, March 14, with Willamette University ended an unusually active and successful season in the field of Women's Intercollegiate Debate. This year the women's forensic activities were not confined to participation in the traditional triangular debate with Washington State College and the University of Idaho as was formerly the custom but, though very satisfactory debates were held with both of these schools, the highlights .of this year's season were the debates with the University of Utah, Pacific University, Willamette University, the University of Oregon and Oregon State College. The season opened December 4 when Katherine Kiesling and Catherine Ogden met a team from the University of Idaho in a non-decision debate at Moscow with the Whitman team taking the negative side of the question "Resolved that the preponderance of women teachers from the fourth through the twelfth grade in our American schools is detrimental." December 5 Katherine Kiesling and Cornelia Hansen upheld the same side of the question at Pullman while Mildred Murtha and Helen Russell took the affirmative side of the question in a debate with the University of Idaho in the college chapel. February 7 in an extra debate with W. S. C. Catherine Ogden and Eloise Neilson took the affirmative side of the question "Resolved that the modern diversion of women from the home to the industrial and business occupations is detrimental to society." Katherine Kiesling and Catherine Ogden proved their capabilities as debaters the afternoon of February 24 when they met and won the decision from a team representing the University of Utah. March 3 these two left on a debating trip through Oregon and during the six days of their absence met teams from Willamette University, Pacific University, the University of Oregon and Oregon State College. They returned in time to participate in the return debate with 0. S. C. here, March 10. The season ended with a debate in the college chapel March 14 when Cornelia Hansen and Mildred Murtha upheld the affirmative side of the question against Willamette University. In addition to the eleven debates in which the members of the Varsity squad engaged a heavy schedule of exhibition debates was planned and carried out by members of the freshman squad in order to maintain the interest of the freshmen women who are not eligible for participation in intercollegiate debates and to give them experience and training that will make them valuable assets to next year's squad. Exhibition debates were given in Prescott High School, Pomeroy High School and Pendleton High School. The Freshman women who took part in these debates were: Mary Bower, Marjorie Douglas, Lois Henderson, Lucille Harris, Lois Brakemeyer, Helen Palmquist, Margaret Paul Johnson, Mary Reed, and Edna Miller.

 

Ye Olde Talke Shoppe

 

OFFICERS

President ......................................................................................................... Catherine Ogden

Vice-President ......................................................................................................... Helen Bown

Secretary-Treasurer ........................................................................... Katherine Kiesling

Ye Talke Shoppe is an organization for the purpose of promoting and encouraging forensic activities among the women of the college. It was organized in 192S and since that time has been very active in furthering its purpose which is to encourage, not more talking, but better talking among all the women students. The membership of Ye Talke Shoppe cannot exceed twenty members and is usually kept a little below this number so that only those women who show unusual ability and interest in forensics are admitted. The new members are chosen strictly on their ability as speakers and are admitted only after they have tried out before and been voted upon by the organization as a whole.

 

Team Results

 

I.                 Debate at Whitman

A.               More men turned out for debate this year then ever before. Crowds at debates excelled those of past years.

B.               The season began with the annual triangular debates with Washington State College and the University of Idaho, in the month of December.

C.              Intramural resolution was “Resolved: That the intervention of the federal government has been detrimental to the farmers.”

D.              Intercollegiate debate

1.               At Moscow Talcott Ostrander and George MacClain debated their way to a decision over the University of Idaho.

2.               Vernon Wilkinson and Sidney Cottle were less fortunate at Pullman, for the critic judge decided against them, in spite of Wilkinson’s uncanny rebuttal.

3.               At home, Albert Garretson and Kenneth Davis successfully defended themselves against the onslaught of Washington State College debaters, easily subduing their opponents for a decision for Whitman.

4.               The question argued in these three debaters was “Resolved, That the English indictment of American education is justified.”

E.               This year the women’s forensic activities were not confined to participation in the traditional triangular debate with Washington State College and the University of Idaho as was formerly the custom but, though very satisfactory debates were held with both of these schools, the high lights of this year’s season were the debates with the University of Utah, Pacific University, Willamette University, the University of Oregon and Oregon State College.

1.               December 4, Katherine Kiesling and Catherine Ogden met a team from the University of Idaho in a non-decision debate at Moscow.

2.               February 7, in an extra debate with W.S.C. Catherine Ogden and Eloise Neilson took the affirmative side of the question “Resolved that the modern diversion of women from the home to the industrial and business occupations is detrimental to society.”

F.               In addition to the eleven debates in which the member of the Varsity squad engaged a heavy schedule of exhibition debates.

G.              During the year about 13 students traveled with the team.

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Pacific Forensic League

NOTE: THE 1931 YEARBOOK WAS FOR THE 1929-1930 YEAR. THERE WERE TWO YEARBOOKS IN 1933 APPROXIMATELY TO ADDRESS THIS “DELAYED YEARBOOK DATE” ISSUE.

 

Description: Description: Description: 1929-1930 Ye Talke Shoppe

 

Team Results continued

 

IV. Debate at Whitman

A. Mark Harris, the new debate coach, was in charge of both the men’s and women’s teams.

B. National topics

1. The men’s topic was “Resolved: That the nation should adopt a plan for complete disarmament except for such forces as are necessary for police power.”

2. The women’s topic was “Resolved: That the modern diversion of women from the home to business and industrial occupations is detrimental to society.”

C. More men and women participated in debate at Whitman than ever before, despite the fact that membership was limited to upper class students.

D. The Wranglers Club, founded three years prior but never very active, experienced a surge in activity. The club’s purpose was to provide a forum for first year students ineligible for the team, holding exhibitions at several high schools.

E. Albert Garretson won the William Thomas Dovell Contest, with Chester Babcock taking second.

F. The women’s debate team organized exhibitions at local high schools to get students involved in forensics. Mary Bower, Marjorie Douglas, Lois Henderson, Lucille Harris, Lois Brakemeyer, Helen Palmquist, Margaret Paul Johnson, Mary Reed, and Edna Miller participated.

G. Intercollegiate debate

1. The season began with the Triangular Debates against Washington State College and the University of Idaho. Talcott Anderson and George Maclain won over Idaho, Vernon Wilkinson and Sidney Cottle lost to Washington, Garretson and Kenneth Davidson defeated Washington. The topic, suggested by Whitman’s coach, was “Resolved: That the English indictment of American education is justified.”

2. In February, Paul Boley and Wilkinson debated a team from the University of Utah at Whitman. Over 100 people attended the debate on disarmament, but due to a mistake by Utah during prep, no decision on who won was made.

3. In March, Clarke Emery and Maclain on the affirmative debated Brigham Young University and won.

4. Later in March, Garretson and Davidson debated four colleges and attended one tournament on a three week tour of western colleges. Davidson place second in oration at the tournament.

5. The women’s team also participated in Triangular Debates on the topic “Resolved: That the preponderance of women teachers from the fourth through the twelfth grades in our American schools is detrimental.” Katherine Kiesling and Catherine Ogden, Cornelia Hansen, and Eloise Neilson participated. All debates were non-decisive.

6. In February, Kiesling and Ogden debated on the affirmative against Utah and won.

7. On March 3, Kiesling and Ogden toured Oregon, debating Willamette, Pacific University, the University of Oregon, and Oregon State College.

 

Kenneth Garner from about this time at Whitman, wrote in to Jim Hanson, DOF, sometime in 2001 to say “glad to hear you are doing so well.”