1921-1922 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

Professor L.W. Sawtelle

Description: Description: 1912 davis Description: Description: 1919-1920 G 

William R. Davis, George Marquis, Walter Eels (not pictured)

 

Description: Description: 1921-1922 Delta Sigma Rho

 

Whitman News

I. Whitman College in 1921-1922

            A. There were no new professors added to the faculty.

            B. Stephen Beasely Linnard Penrose was president of Whitman College.

C. Nathaniel Penrose was president of the Associated Students of Whitman

            D. Professor L.W. Sawtette of the Department of English was the Debate coach.

E. There were no other debate faculty members. This was partially because the women’s team was dissolved due to conflicts in scheduling and finances.

 

III. At Whitman College

            A. Kodak ran ads in the Pioneer along with Jackson Drug Co. and KandyLand.

B. The Whitman Men's Glee Club went on a “Concert Tour” and scored success

             with the ladies. Tons of music articles cluttered the Pioneer.

            C. Lectures and Religious Sermons were give by Dr. Richard LaRae Swain.

            D. Penrose house was “newly constructed” and housed the Penroses!

 

Description: Description: 1921-22 Award of Honors- Dovell Broning

Speech in the English Department News

p. 76-77

 

MAJOR COURSES.—Students who select English as their major study may take either of the following courses: 1. A General Major Course, of 44 hours, including 6 hours of advanced writing and speaking; 2. A Major for Teachers, of 48 hours, including Courses 3, 4, 5, 10, II, and 21.

 

COURSES IN WRITING

 

1. Written Composition.—This course aims to stimulate Freshmen to think independently and clearly and to train them to write correctly and effectively. Themes are required regularly and the instructor confers with each student every week on his writing. Any student found deficient in English preparation will be required to make good his deficiency. Required of Freshmen. Two hours, first and second terms.

2. Written Composition.—This course is a continuation of Course 1. Required of Sophomores. Two hours, second or third term.

3. An Introduction to Journalism.—This course is devoted to practice in journalistic writing. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first term.

4. Narrative Writing.—This course is devoted primarily to the writing of various types of narratives. In connection with the writing assigned a study is made of the principles of narrative structure. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second term.

5. Advanced Composition.—Usually exposition and the personal essay are given chief attention in this course. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term.

COURSES IN SPEAKING

6.     Oral Composition.—This course aims to develop the ability

7.     f. Argumentation and Debate.—The aim of the course is not

8.     so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. Open to students above Freshmen year. Three hours, first and second terms.

9. Public Speaking.—This course is devoted chiefly to the composition and the delivery of occasional speeches and short orations. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term.

10. Oral Interpretation of Literature.—This course is intended to meet the needs of students who expect to become teachers of literature. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term.

11. Drill, is given to all speakers who compete in contests and to those who appear on the Commencement program. Dramatic productions by students are also carefully directed. *

 

COURSES IN LITERATURE

12. An Introduction to English Poetry.—This course, devoted to the reading and discussion of various types of English poetry, is designed for Sophomores, whether they are major students in English or not. Three hours, second term.

13. English Literature from 1557 to 1660.—In this course special attention is given to the works of Spenser, Bacon, and Milton. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first term. [Not given in 1922-1923.]

14. English Literature from 1660 to 1798.—A survey of the chief writers of the period. Three hours, second term. Not given in 1922-1923.]

15. English Literature from 1798 to 1832.—The poetry and prose of the Romantic period. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first term. Not given in 1922-1923.]

16. English Literature from 1832 to 1892.—In the second term special attention is given to the works of Tennyson; in the third to the works of Browning. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second and third terms. Not given in 1922-1923.]

 

p. 96

 

Award of Honors in 1921

The Commencement Marshall

JAMES HARPER JOY, Class of 1922

 

The John Brining Prizes in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking—

First: NORBORNE BERKELEY, JR„ Class of 1924

Second: FERN LEAH COBLE, Class of 1924

 

The William Thomas Dovell Prizes in Oratory—

First: WERNER WALDEMAR BAUMEISTER, Class of 1921

Second: WINIFRED FRANCES BELL, Class of 1921

 

The Christopher Columbus Gose Prize in History—

MALCOLM DONALDSON BRODE, Class of 1921

 

 

Description: Description: 1921-22 Varsity Debate

 

Description: Description: 1921-22 Varsity Debate Cont

 

1922

 

The William Thomas Dovell Prizes in Oratory—same as 1918

The John Brining Extemporaneous Speaking Contest—same as 1917

Student Organizations—same as 1921

English Dept. Courses in Speech

COURSES IN SPEAKING

 

6.         Oral Composition.—This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It supplements Course 1 in study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Two terms required of Freshmen; one term required of Sophomores. One hour, three terms.

Argumentation and Debate.—The aim of the course is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. Open to students above Freshman year. Three hours, first term.

5.         Public Speaking.—This course is devoted chiefly to the com­position and the delivery of occasional speeches and short ora­tions. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second term.

9.         Oral Interpretation of Literature.—This course is intended to meet the needs of students who expect to become teachers of literature. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term.

Drill is given to all speakers who compete in contests and to those who appear on the Commencement program.

 

Awards- 1921

The John Brining Prize in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking—

First: NORBORNE BERKELEY, JR., Class of 1924

Second: FERN LEAN COELE, Class of 1924

 

The William Thomas Dovell Prices in Oratory—

First: WERNER WALDEMAR BAUMEISTER, Class of 1921

Second: WINIFRED FRANCES BELL, Class of 1921

 

 

World News

 

·        Britain gives Ireland dominion status, except for six counties in the north which remain within the United Kingdom.” *

·        Britain gives Egypt independence, except for the Suez Canal, which Britain continues to control.”*

·        “The use of radio broadcasting to influence the masses begins in the Soviet Union.” *

·        “Mongolian nationalists ask Russian Bolshevik forces for help against anti-communist (White) Russian troops. A Mongolian People's Party is formed and acquires political power, with the country's Buddhist leader as a figurehead” *

·        Russia's Marxist government signs trade agreements with Britain, Germany, Norway and Austria. Membership in the Communist Party reaches 730,000, tripling what it was in 1919.” *

·        “In U.S., Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, Italian-born anarchists, convicted of armed robbery murder; case stirs worldwide protests; they are executed in 1927.” *

·        “For the first time, the United States passed a restrictive immigration quota. The quota was designed to maintain the "character" of the United States. It apportioned immigration certificates based on the population of the United States in the year 1910.” *

·        “The United States, Britain, Japan, France and Italy met and agreed on a treaty limiting naval powers.”*

·        Britain gives Ireland dominion status, except for six counties in the north which remain within the United Kingdom.”

·        Britain gives Egypt independence, except for the Suez Canal, which Britain continues to control.”

·        “The use of radio broadcasting to influence the masses begins in the Soviet Union.”

·        “Mongolian nationalists ask Russian Bolshevik forces for help against anti-communist (White) Russian troops. A Mongolian People's Party is formed and acquires political power, with the country's Buddhist leader as a figurehead”

·        Russia's Marxist government signs trade agreements with Britain, Germany, Norway and Austria. Membership in the Communist Party reaches 730,000, tripling what it was in 1919.”

·        “In U.S., Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, Italian-born anarchists, convicted of armed robbery murder; case stirs worldwide protests; they are executed in 1927.”

·        “For the first time, the United States passed a restrictive immigration quota. The quota was designed to maintain the "character" of the United States. It apportioned immigration certificates based on the population of the United States in the year 1910.”

·        “The United States, Britain, Japan, France and Italy met and agreed on a treaty limiting naval powers.”

 

Team News

 

Frosh-Soph Debate Planned By Coach – October 14, 1921

Tryout for Annual Word Battle of Lower Classmen Coming Soon.

Another budding Whitman tradition which was started last year, the Freshman-Sophomore Debate is already being gotten under way for Fall, 1921. Nine freshmen and seven sophomores met with Prof. Sawtelle, the debate coach, Tuesday after chapel and made the preliminary arrangements for the tryouts, which will probably be held next week.

            The subject has no been definitely decided on as yet, although there is some possibility that the question will be “Resolved, That the Phillippine Islands should be granted their independence during the next session of congress.” The tryouts will be conducted under practically extemporaneous conditions.

            The men who signed up for the tryouts are: Sophomore – Virgil Thomas, Gordon Gilmore, (both of whom were members of last year’s team;) Arthur Sehnasse, Lloyd Wir, Waldemer Carlson, Jimmy Page, and Joel Gould. Freshmen – Mynard Meekhof, Edward Sunith, Harold King, Thomas Allen, Clarence Jayne, Richard Ayres, Roy Keiffer, John Brickman, and Paul Shetter.

            The freshmen were the winners of the contest last year, with the affirmative side of the question, “Resolved, That the United States should adopt the League of Nations under the Versailles Covenant.”

 

Debater’s Charter Long Delayed, is Hung in Chapel – November 4, 1921

Delta Sigma Rho Chapter Gets Engraved Emblem From National Fraternity

            “Can you hang it for us today, Mr. Hull. You see it’s been delayed several months now and we want to get it up just as soon as possible. No not over there. Hang it on the left hand side. Dr. Penrose wants it there where all may see it as they pass into chapel.”

            Shortly after this conversation had taken place the long delayed charter of Delta Sigma Rho was neatly suspended on the chapel wall where it may serve to encourage the forensic artists of the future.

            Engraved upon the charter are the names of the fifteen original members of Delta Nu Lambda, the local body which petitioned Delta Sigma Rho in May, 1920.

            Delta Sigma Rho is conceded to be the strongest Greek letter forensic society to be founded in American colleges.

            The purpose of this society is to stimulate interest in debating and to encourage effective public speaking.

 

Frosh- Sophs Mix in annual debate at chapel tonight – November 18, 1921

Permanent Independence of Philippine Islands to Afford Subject of Word Fray.

Talks Extemporaneous

Winning Class to Have Numerals Inscribed On Cup Presented By 1908 Class.

            Under the coaching of Professor L. W. Sawtelle the second annual debate between the Freshman and Sophomore classes will be given tonight at eight o’clock in the college chapel. The question is: “Resolved, That the Philippine Islands should be granted their independence during the next session of congress.”

            The Freshman class will uphold the affirmative side of the question with a team composed of Harold King, Mynerd Meekhor and Edward Smith. The negative side will be taken by the Sophomore team composed of Norborne Berkeley, Virgil Thomas and Gail Willianus. Each man is allowed ten minutes for constructive speech and four minutes for rebuttal.

            Mr. George Woodward of the class of 1908 will have charge of the debate as chairman of the evening.

            The method used in preparing for this debate is not the one generally used by debates of preparing a set speech and committing it to memory. The students have studied the question for four weeks, gathering all the information possible on both sides and from all angles. They were no assigned to teams nor sides until last Monday afternoon. Therefore the speeches will be in a sense extemporaneous, and will still embrace in detail the question to be debated. This method of studying a question is thought to further the individual knowledge of the question and to allow for more life and originality in the preparation of speeches by the debaters.

            The class of 1908 of the college has donated a splendid silver cup for the winner of the contest. The class winning it will engrave the class numerals on the cup and will have possession of it for the year. The next year the trophy will be awarded again “to the winners of the same contest. The awarding of this prize will stimulate the work in inter-class debates a great deal.

            It is the object of this class debate to primarily obtain for the participants actual practice in debate and public speaking. It often results in uncovering some very likely material for the varsity debate teams.

 

 

Award ’08 cup for Frosh-Soph Debate - Nobember 18, 1921

Winners of Contest Awarded Former Literary Society Cup

            Additional interest is added to the Freshmen Sophomore debate in the college chapel tonight with the announcement that the debate cup presented by the Class of 1908 at the time of their commencement will be awarded to the winners of the forensic contest.

            When the cup was given to the college it was intended that it serve as an award to the winner of the annual debate between the Phrenokoamian and Athenaem literary societies. The cup is triple silver plated and of an inverted bell shaped, standing twelve inches high. The engraving on one side of the cup reads:

Inter-Society Debate

Trophy Cup

Presented to the Literary Societies of Whitman College

BY the Class of 1909, June 9, 1908

            The cup was awarded only once, the Phrenokosmian society being the winner. Was the abandonment of the literary societies for other organizations the cup has remained from year to year on the shelves in the library.

            Since last spring Prof. Eels, a member and secretary of the class has corresponded with and obtained the unanimous consent of all member of the class to have the cup awarded to the winner of the Freshman-Sophomore debate each year.

 

Soph Debaters win victory for frosh November 24, 1921

Second Year Speakers Win Decision in well presented Forensic.

            The Sophmore Class won a unanimous decision over the Freshmen in the annual interclass debate-contest held in the chapel last Friday night. The question: “Resolved, that the United States should retain the Philippine Islands permanently.” was ably presented by both sides.

            Edward Smith, Mynerd Meekhof and Harold King upheld the affirmative side of the question for the first year men while Virgil Thomas, Norborne Berkeley and Gail Williams presented the case for the winners.

            Virgil Thomas, for the Sophomores, and Edward Smith for the Freshmen, showed exceptional ability in the debate, being especially strong in their rebuttals.

            The case presented by both sides showed thorough training and a knowledge of the question.

            George Woodward presided and at the close presented the beautiful cup on behalf of the class of ’08 to the victorious sophomores.

            Russell Miller, ’16, Parker Barrett, ’03, and Rev M.R., Bollen. A.M., ’17, were the judges.

            Preceding the debate, Miss Helen Campbell of the Freshmen class, offered a delightful violin solo, being accompanied at the piano by Miss Fern Prowell.

 

Date is Set for Debate – December 3 1921

Freshman to Argue With Pacific University on January 13 According to Present Plans.

Two Teams to talk

            January 13 has been selected as the date for the freshman debate with Pacific University. The usual plan of having a team on one side of the question here and one at Pacific will be followed in the arrangements.

            The question to be debated is ‘Resoled that the Kansas Industrial Court Plan of adjusting industrial disputes should be adopted throughout the United States.”

            Tryouts for the teams for the debate were held in Room 17 Tuesday afternoon. The two teams chosen include, Thomas Allen, Richard Ayres. C. M. Jantzen, Mynerd Meekhof, Ralph Walker and Elmer Swenson, with Homer Votaw and Kenneth Gibson as alternates. The judges of the tryouts were Prof. H. A. Texler, W. R. Davis and W. A. Bratton.

            The debate is under the coaching of Prof. L. W. Sawtelle the debate coach of the college.

 

Tryout is held for ‘U’ Debate – December 9, 1921

Four Men and Two Alternates Win Places On Squad Which Meets Washington

            Tryouts for the teams to meet the University of Washington is the annual debate to be staged the latter part of February, were held last evening in the College Chapel, and two teams of three men each were chosen. The third man on each team is the alternate.

            When the debate was set for the tryouts there was a great deal of interest shown by the students and over fifteen men signed up for the preliminaries. This was before the recent announcement of the closing of college one week earlier than usual and those who have been compelled to dropout of the tryouts have given this unexpected shortening of the term as the primary reason.

            Although nearly six weeks have passed since the opening of negotiations with the University of Washington debate authorities, no decision has been reached that is satisfactory to both parties in concerning with the question. Practically the only subject that the University debaters wish to consider is some phase of the disarmament question and the unreliability of it as a debatable matter has deferred Coach Sawtelle from accepting. Whitman has submitted ten questions, however, and it is expected that the Washington men will be able to find one out of that number that they approve of. The question for debate in last evening’s tryouts was, “Resolved: That the independent governments of the American Continents should form a Leader for the enforcement of the principles of the Monroe Doctrine.” It is one of the questions submitted the University.

            The following were the tryouters: Mobray Tetsy, Leonard Merryweather, Pryor Smith, Gail Williams, William Lucht, Murray Jones, Virgil Thomas, George Hansen, Benjamin Comrada, and Alfred Sherman.

 

February 9 or 10 date of ‘U’ Debate – January 13 1922

See Probability of Settling On one of these Two Times: Question Picked.

            That February 9 or 10 will be the probable date of the annual University of Washington dual debate with Whitman is the information received by Debate Coach L. W. Sawtelle from Seattle. Although definite agreement has not been reached on the proposed date, it is expected that the contest will be held at that time.

            Difficulties regarding the question to be discussed were finally cleared up by hthe acceptance by Washington of the subject “ResolvedL that the United States should adopt by legislation a system of compulsory unemployment insurance, such as they have in England,” proposed by the Whitman team. Briefs for both negative and affirmative of this question are being prepared by members of the teams with the anticipation of a series of practice debates beginning next week.

            The subject which has been comparatively little used in debate circles, is considered a particularly interesting one in the light of the present unemployment problem.

            The Whitman teams will be composed of Ben Comrada, Chester Lesh, Mowbray Tale and Virgil Thomas.

 

Freshman debaters meet Pacific Friday in first dual-debate January 13 1922

Kansas System of Settling Industrial Disputes Is to Be Question.

Negative teams travel

            Next Friday, Jan. 20, the Freshman debating teams of the college will meet the teams from Pacific University. Each school will have a debate o the same night. The question for debate is: “Resolved that the Kansas Industrial Court Plan of adjusting disputes should be adopted through out the United States.”

            The affirmative team, composed of Harold King, Elmer Swenson and Edward Smith, will debat at home in Memorial Chapel at 8 o’clock.

            The negative team to go to Pacific University is composed of Ralph Walker, Tom Allen and Clark Jantze. Munerd Meekhof has been working as alternate on this team. This team will leave Thursday morning, Jan. 19.

            The debaters give much credit to Prof. L. W. Sawtelle who is the coach of the team. This is the first time that Whitman has made an attempt at inter-collegiate freshman debating and the interest displayed by the students in it will determine whether or not it will become a permanent institutional at Whitman.

 

University debate date finally set – January 20, 1922

Annual Clash of Two Institutions is to be held Thursday Evening. Feb. 9.

            Thursday, Feb. 9, has finally been set as the date for the Varsity debate with the teams from the University of Washington. The Whitman negative team which travels to Seattle will meet the Sundodgers there the following evening.

            According to present indications the negative team will be made up of Chester Lesh and Ben Comrada while Mobray Tate and Virgil Thomas will uphold the affirmative on the question. There has been no decision as to which team, Gail Williams and Pryor Smith, the alternative will be affiliated with, although it is expected that Smith will be the negative alternate.

            The question “Resolved, That the United States should enact legislation providing a system of compulsory unemployment insurance similar to that now in force in Great Britain,” is particularly interesting at this time on account of the recent adoption of unemployment insurance In several of the large industrial corporations of the country.

            Any hazard as to the respective strengths of the four teams are worth very little at this time. Glen Hoover, the Sundodger’s coach is a new man to the University and there is a good deal of speculation as to the type of teams he will turn out.

 

Frosh win and lose dual debate with Pacific university – January 27, 1922

Argue on Question Kansas Court Plan of Settling Disputes

Affirmative teams win

            A three to nothing victory for the affirmative at home, and a three to nothing defeat for the negative team at Forest Grove, Oregon, were the results of the Whitman-Pacific University freshman debate on the question: ‘Resolved, That the Kanssa Industrial Court Plan of adjusting disputes should be adopted throughout the United States.” Elmer Swenson, Harlod King, and Everett Smith upheld the affirmative at home against Leonard Alley, Sinforoso Padilla, and Samuel Pearlman, while Myner Meekoff, Ralph Walker, and Clark Jantzen represented Whitman at Pacific University.

            The excellent preparation of the Whitman affirmative both in collection of material, and in delivery, was largely responsible for their victory although the failure of the negative to support their evidence with conclusive evidence, as well as a possible inequality in the question were factors contributing to the Whitman victory.

            The defeat of the negative team seems to have been due, first, to a lack of authorities at the disposal of the negative whose statements would have weight in influencing the judges, and second, to the inequality of the question favorable to the affirmative. According to Mynerd Meekoff, captain of the negative, his colleagues. Walker and Jantzen, deserve commendation for their work as they worked hard not only at home, but also on the trop and during their stay in Portland.

 

Select teams for U of W. Debate

Tate and Thomas debate Here Comrada and Lesh at Seattle – February 3, 1922

            Mobrary Tate and Virgil Thomas have finally been picked to debate the negative team of the University of Washington, here next Thursday evening in the college Chapel on the question “Resolved that the United States should enact legislation providing a s system of compulsory unemployment insurance similar to that now in force in Great Britain.

            Chester Lesh and Ben Comrada will make the trip to Seattle to uphold the negative side of the debate for Whitman.

            Kai Jensen and Jim Bailey compose the team for the University that will debate here, while Robert MacFarlane and Herb Little will argue for the sundoggers at Seattle, Friday evening.

            No choice of judges or of chairman has been made by either school according to the latest reports but it is certain that the officials will, in each case be local men, as there is a clause in the agreement between the two schools which states that each school may select their officials form their respective localities.

 

Debate Decision is held unit tonight – Feburary 10, 1922

Comrada and Lesh to Argue Against Unemployment At Seattle Tonight

            Both student body and townspeople were well represented at the Whitman University of Washington debate held last evening in the College chapel on the subject, Resolved: That the United States should enact legislation providing a system of compulsory unemployment insurance similar to that now in the force in Great Britain.

            Mowbray Tate 23 and Virgil Thomas 23 upheld the affirmative side of the question for Whitman, while Herbert Little 22 and Ralph Graves 22, brought out the negative arguments for the Huskies.

            William E. Berney ’15 acted as chairman, and W. A. Lacey, principal of Walla Walla high school, Attorney W. G. Coleman and C. C. Garrett of the weather bureau acted as judges. The decision of the judges was withheld until tonight in order that it should in no way effect the out come of the Seattle debate which will be held in Meaney Hall at the University of Washington tonight.

            Ben Comrada ’22 and Chester Lesh ’23 left for Seattle last evening to meet the affirmative team of the University Orin Vinning ’23 and James Bailey ’22, compose the Huskies home team.

            Delta Sigma Rho entertained the debaters and friends at an oyster supper at Reynolds Hall after the debate.

 

Head of National debating Society Visits Whitman – March 10, 1922

Delta Sigma Rho President Inspects Local Chapter of Fraternity

Gives Talk in Chapel

            Stanley B. Houck, national president of Delta Sigma Rho, national forensic fraternity, inspected the Whitman chapter on Tuesday of this week. Mr Houek who is making a tour of the western colleges having chapters of the fraternity, arrived in Walla Wall Tuesday morning and was met at the train by a number of his fraternity brothers and escorted to the college.

            He gave a short talk in chapel, commenting on the Whitman chapter of his fraternity, saying that it was an exceptional thing to find a chapter in so small a college. He emphasized the fact that the society was organized primarily to encourage better public speaking. He also stated that the fraternity contained no honorary members and initiated only those who had taken part in intercollegiate debate. It was Delta Sigma Rho that organized the Four Minute movement during the war.

 

Ilkawan Debate Team is Chosen – March 17, 1922

Three Man Team to Meet Columbia College is Coached by Tate

William Bryan, Murray Jones, and Oscar Starr will comprise the debate team which will represent the Ilkawan club against Columbia college at Milton Oregon, on the 25th of Marh.

            Mowbray Tate, varsity debater and member of Delta Sigma Rho has been coaching the Ilkawan team, which will uphold the negative in the question, “Resolved: That the United States cancel all the debts of her allies contracted during , and on account of the world war.”

            The judges have not been selected, but will be selected by the club from a list of possible judges to be submitted by Columbia College.

 

Ilkawan To debate Columbia Saturday – March 24 1922

In their first debate with an outside organization the Ilkawan debate team will meet the Columbia college team at Milton tomorrow night, at 8 o’clock in the Columbia chapel.

            Due to the illness of William Bryan, Thomas Allen has been placed upon the Ilkawan team, the other members being Murray Jones and Oscar Starr.

 

Penrose to debate on 30-10 measure

 

Team Results

 

IV. Debate at Whitman College

A. The Women’s Debate team was dissolved for multiple purposes.

B. There was a Freshman-Sophomore Men’s Debate Competition, otherwise known as the “Debating Cup”.

C. Intercollegiate Debate

1. The Freshman Debate with Pacific University of Forest Grove, Oregon January 20th was the first intercollegiate contest of any kind to be held for the benefit of freshmen. Freshmen could not compete at the varsity level.

2. In two intercollegiate contests, the Freshman Debate and the Triangular Contest between Whitman and Idaho and Washington.

3. Delta Sigma Rho, the national honorary debating fraternity arranged an Extemporaneous Speaking contest for the High Schools.

4. A new men’s debating organization, the Ilkawan Club, was formed. Murray Jones, Thomas Allen, and Oscar Starr represented Ilkawan at the Columbia College tournament at Milton. They debated the cancellation of war debts owed to the U.S. by the Allies.

5. Hallbert Holmes was chosen to represent Whitman College at the Washington State College Tournament on May 6th.

6.     The Resolution for the Freshman-Sophomore Men’s Debate Squad was: “Resolved, That the United States should retain the Philippine Islands permanently.”

7. The Pacific Freshman Dual Debate resolution was: “Resolved, That That the Kansas Industrial Court plan of adjusting industrial disputes should be adopted throughout the United States.”

8. The resolution for the Varsity Dual Debate Squad was: “Resolved, That the United States should enact legislation providing a system of compulsory unemployment insurance similar to that now in force in Great Britain.”

9.     The negative freshman squad won 3-0 against the sophomore affirmative team.

10. The affirmative dual freshman team defeated the negative team 3-0

11. The varsity negative squad defeated the affirmative squad with a 2-1 decision.

D. There were 6 Freshman-Sophomore debaters, 6 Pacific Freshman debaters, and 4 Varsity Dual debaters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Taken from: http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005250.html

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