1920-1921 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

The men’s debate coach was Mr. L. T. Sawtelle (no picture available)

Description: Description: 1912 davis Description: Description: 1919-1920 G 

William R. Davis, George Marquis, Walter Eels served as advisors

 

Description: Description: 1919-1920 Miss Gardiner

The women’s debate coach was Miss Dorothy Gardiner

 

Note: This is Whitman’s first year in DSR.

 

 

Whitman News

 

I. Whitman College in 1920-1921

            A. Frederick and Sarah Weyerhaeuser gave a $75,000 endowment to the college

B. Eugene Woodruff was the student body president and Ruth Isaacs was the Vice President

            C. S.B.L. Penrose was the college president

            D. Mu Phi Epsilon, a national women’s musical fraternity was established on the campus.

            E. Increased enrollment made Whitman the largest music school in the Northwest

            F. The Sigma Gamma and Zeta Phi Epsilon fraternities were established on campus.

 

II. At Whitman College

A. The new campus sport was field hockey. Eighteen women participated.

B. The Pioneer ran ads for clothing stores and Corona, “The personal writing machine”

C. Whitman’s football team beat the University of Washington 34-12 led by Benny Camrada.

D. Women’s hemlines rose nearly to the knee level.

 

Speech in the English Department News

p. 46-47

 

The competition is to be open to members of the sophomore, the junior, and the senior classes. There must be at least five competitors. The essays are limited to 5,000 words. The contestants present their subjects to the head of the English Department for approval not later than the third Tuesday of February. Essays are due on the second Monday in May, signed by a fictitious name, with an accompanying sealed envelope containing the real name of the writer. The award is made by a committee of three judges, not connected with the College, upon the basis of scholarly work and literary style, and is announced at commencement. (1906)

 

THE BURKE PRIZES —Judge Thomas Burke, of Seattle, offers two annual prizes of thirty dollars each in the department of Modern Languages, for students of French and Spanish. These prizes will be awarded on the following conditions: Competition for these prizes shall be open to all students of the College in French and Spanish respectively. Application to be a competitor for either of these prizes must be made to the Head of the Department of Modern Languages before a date set in the second term. On or before the first of May competitors shall submit to the Head of the Department of Modern Languages a composition of not less than 500 words, written in French or Spanish as the case may be. Competitors will be expected to discuss their compositions in the language in which they are written. Candidates shall be judged upon the thought and idiomatic use of the language of their written work, and upon the fluency and accuracy of their speech, (1910)

 

THE JOHN BRINING EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING CONTEST — Mr. John Brining of Dayton, Washington, offers two prizes, one of fifteen and one of ten dollars, to winners in a speaking contest open to members of the first year class. The contest is held during Commencement week. Contestants receive their subjects three hours before they speak. In preparing their speeches they are not permitted to consult any person. (1915)

 

THE WILLIAM THOMAS DOVELL PRIZES IN ORATORY — Alumni members of the Board of Overseers have established two prizes, one of fifty dollars and one of twenty-five dollars, in memory of the late William Thomas Dovell, a member of the class of 1888, upon the following conditions' The prizes shall be awarded upon the basis of an oratorical contest to be held during Commencement week, provided that at least four contestants participate. The contest is open to members of the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. The orations are limited to two thousand words. Contestants present their subjects to the head of the English Department for approval not later than the third Tuesday of February. If more than six contestants submit orations, they present them to the head of the English Department not later than April fifteenth for submission to a board of judges on thought and composition who select the six best orations for the Commencement contest. The Judges on thought and on delivery are selected by a committee consisting of the President of the College and the heads of the English and the History Departments. (1918)

 

THE CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS GOSE PRIZES IN HISTORY — Alumni members of the Board of Overseers have established two prizes, one of fifty dollars and one of twenty-five dollars, in memory of the late Christopher Columbus Gose, a member of the class of 1886, upon the following conditions: The prizes are to be awarded at Commencement on the basis of competitive essays on historical subjects. The contest is open to students who shall have completed at least four terms of History at Whitman by the Commencement of the award. Subjects for essays will be posted by the head of the History Department before March first. The selection of subjects will be made by April first and the essays handed in on or before May twentieth. The Judges will be appointed by a committee consisting of the President and the heads of the History and the English Departments. The award will be based upon thoroughness of research and originality of treatment. At least four contestants must participate. No winner of one award will be eligible to another competition. (1918)

 

p.77

 

2. Written Composition — This course is a continuation of Course 1. Required of Sophomores. Two hours, second or third term.

3. An Introduction to Journalism — This course is devoted to practice in journalistic writing. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first term.

4. Narrative Writing — This course is devoted primarily to the writing of various types of narratives. In connection with the writing assigned a study is made of the principles of narrative structure. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second term.

5. Advanced Composition — Usually exposition and the personal essay are given chief attention in this course. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term.

 

COURSES IN SPEAKING

 

6. Oral Composition — This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It supplements Course I in study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Two terms required of First years; one term required of Sophomores. One hour, three terms.

7. Argumentation and Debate — The aim of the course is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. Open to students above First year. Three hours, first term.

8. Public Speaking — This course is devoted chiefly to the composition and the delivery of occasional speeches and short orations. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second term.

9. Oral Interpretation of Literature — This course is intended to meet the needs of students who expect to become teachers of literature. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term. Drill is given to all speakers who compete in contests and to those who appear on the Commencement program.

 

p. 96

 

Award of Honors 1920

 

The John Brining Prizes in Firstyear Extemporaneous Speaking-

First: ELIZABETH VIRGINIA PETERS, Class of 1923

Second: JAMES PRENTICE WARNER, Class of 1923

 

The William Thomas Dowell Prizes in Oratory—

First: EDWIN DOUGLAS FORD, JR., Class of 1921

Second: GRACE YOLKTAI LEE, Class of 1920

 

The Christopher Columbus Gose Prizes in History—

First: LULU HASKELL HOLMES, Class of 1921

Second: ROY MACDONALD TATE, Class of 1921

 

Student Organizations

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE. An association, of which every student of the College is a member, has a general supervision of student activities. Its affairs are managed by an Executive Committee made up of its officers and representatives of the faculty and alumni. The chief activities controlled by it are athletics, debate, and oratory, the glee clubs, and the publishing of the college weekly, the Pioneer. Questions which concern student welfare are discussed by the committee and recommendations are made by it to the student body for action. The dues paid by every student are collected by the Bursar and used for the purposes of the organization.

 

English Department Courses in Speech—Same as 1920

 

World News

·       1920

A. “Finland gains independence from the USSR.”*

B. “The British Parliament passed the Government Act. The Act called for the creation of separate parliaments in Northern and Southern Ireland.”*

      C. “Right wing forces, led by Wolfgang Kapp, attempted to overthrow the Weimar government.”*

      D. “Gandhi began a nationwide speaking campaign to enlist support for the non-cooperation movement.”*

E. “Under terms agreed to at the Versailles Conference, the British government was given the mandate for Palestine.”*

F. “The Syrian National Congress declared its complete independence. However, Syria had been promised to the French.”*

G. “The Senate and House overrode the veto of President Wilson and enacted into law a bill outlawing the production, sale and transportation of all forms of liquor.”*

      H. “On November 19th, the US Senate voted 53-38 against the Versailles Treaty.”*

I. “With the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, women finally gained the right to vote.”*

 

 

Team News

 

10-03-1920 – Frosh and Sophs debate Tuesday: League of Nations to be subject for debaters – Women’s Debate Next

 

“Resolved. That the League of Nations should be accepted exactly as it stands under the Versailles covenant.” Is the topic upon which the freshmen-sophomore debate will be held next Tuesday evening at eight o’clock in the chapel.

            Virgil Thomas, Gordon Gilmore and Arthur Douglas will represent the first year men, and Grant Bean, Chester Lesh and Joe Teewinkle the sophomores, as a result of tryouts held three weeks ago.

            The speeches will be eight minutes in length with rebuttals of three minutes. It has been announced Miss Dorothy Gardner is coach of the freshmen and Professor L.T. Sawtille coach of the sophomores.

            Thomas and Bean are former Wa-Hi debaters, while Gilmore, Douglas and Teewinkle have all had high school experience, with Lesh a former Whitman varsity debater, promising a good debate.

            The Tuesday debate is the first of a series of underclass debates to be held as a result of the recent action of Delta Sigma Rho whereby a ruling was passing making freshman ineligible for varsity debate. The underclass debate now offers incoming debaters an opportunity to display their talent, providing excellent material for the varsity debate team and Delta Sigma Rho.

            The next underclass debate will be between the women, Miss. Gardener has announced, and tryouts for the team will be made within the next two weeks. The subject is yet to be selected. The debate Tuesday is open to all students upon presentation of their A.S.W.C. cards, and will start at right o’clock.

 

10-05-1920 - May Debate Idaho: Delta Sigma Rho Endeavoring to Bring Bring About Frosh Debates

 

In an effort to have Whitman represented hereafter in varsity debates by upperclassmen, the local chapter of Delta Sigma Rho the honorary debating society is petitioning the college authorities for permission to handle all debate work. An effort is also being made to arrange dual Freshmen debates with the University of Idaho to be staged in February or March to get the freshmen of the college interested in that branch of activity in order to work up strong teams of upperclassmen in the future.

            At present there are nine active members of the chapter in college including Anne McAuley, Mildred Kent, Elizabeth Peters, Myrtle Mathas, Sidonie Pyle, Harold McGahey, Chester Lesh, Harper Joy, and Ralph Cordiner.

            The officers, recently elected after Harper Joy, president, Elizabeth Peters, secretary, and Ralph Cordiner, treasurer.

 

10-05-1920 – Frosh Debaters Defeat Sophs: Win unanimous decision on League of Nations Covenant Tuesday

 

With a better style of debating and a much better presentation of the question the freshman debating team received the unanimous decision of the judges against the sophomores in the debate on the question “Resolved. That the United States should enter the League of Nations exactly as it stands in the Versailes covenant,” held in the chapel Tuesday evening under the auspices of the local chapter of Delta Sigma Rho, national honorary debating society.

            The debate team was well organized and presented in laudable manner and the members of the teams are to be complemented on their endeavor to keep party sentiment out of the discussion and to make it purely a debate upon the merits of the covenant.

            The main bone of contention by the sophs was that of the impossibility of acceptance of the league because of the opinion of the people and complexion of the senate. The freshmen stuck strictly to the question and endeavored to prove the advisability of the adoption of the Versailles covenant and won the debate on their challenge that not the opinion of the people but the permits of the case was the relevant matter of contest. This was very ably brought out by Arthur Douglas in his rebuttal for the yearlings which concluded the debate.

            The sophomores were represented by Joseph Tewinkle, Grant Bean and Chester Leah, while Arthur Douglas, Gordon Gilmore and Virgil Thomas handled the affirmative side of the question. The freshmen were coached by Miss Dorothy M. Gardner while

 

10-22-1920 – Will Debate Treaty Subject: Subject Chosen for Under Class Debate Series Sides Chosen

 

            Resolved that the United States should adopt the Versailles convenant of the League of Nations.

            This is the subject agreed upon by Professors Dorothy M. Gardner and L.W. Sawtelle, of the English Department, and the students for the Freshman-Sophomore debate which is scheduled to be held the first part of November.

            The changing of the subject to read “Versailles covenant” instead of “with the Lodge Reservations” was decided upon in order to prevent the debate from becoming a political argument instead of a sensible consideration of the right and wrong, the good and bad points of the original League of Nations.

            It is expected that Senator Root’s recent speech in New York in which he declared the “Versailles covenant of the League of Nations would have been accepted by the United States if President Wilson had been willing” will be a feature in the discussion.

            The Freshman are taking the affirmative side under the coaching of Miss Gardner while the Sophomores are being supervised in preparing the negative side of the question by Professor Sawtelle.

 

11-12-1920 – Frosh Debaters Defeat Sophs: Win unanimous decision on League of Nations Covenant Tuesday

 

With a better style of debating and a much better presentation of the question the freshman debating team received the unanimous decision of the judges against the sophomores in the debate on the question “Resolved. That the United States should enter the League of Nations exactly as it stands in the Versailes covenant,” held in the chapel Tuesday evening under the auspices of the local chapter of Delta Sigma Rho, national honorary debating society.

            The debate team was well organized and presented in laudable manner and the members of the teams are to be complemented on their endeavor to keep party sentiment out of the discussion and to make it purely a debate upon the merits of the covenant.

            The main bone of contention by the sophs was that of the impossibility of acceptance of the league because of the opinion of the people and complexion of the senate. The freshmen stuck strictly to the question and endeavored to prove the advisability of the adoption of the Versailles covenant and won the debate on their challenge that not the opinion of the people but the permits of the case was the relevant matter of contest. This was very ably brought out by Arthur Douglas in his rebuttal for the yearlings which concluded the debate.

            The sophomores were represented by Joseph Teewinkle, Grant Bean and Chester Leah, while Arthur Douglas, Gordon Gilmore and Virgil Thomas handled the affirmative side of the question. The freshmen were coached by Miss Dorothy M. Gardner while

 

11-19-1920 - Frosh-Soph Women to Clash in Debate: Miss Gardiner and Mr. Sawtelle to Coach Rival Teams

 

“Resolved. That the Japanese be admitted to the United States on the same terms as other aliens.” Is the subject chosen for the for forensic fray to take place between the women of the Sophomore and Freshman classes.

            Tryouts, the results of which have not yet been announced, were held Thursday for the purpose of choosing three representatives for each class. These teams are to be coached by Miss Gardiner and Mr. Sawtelle – the coaches drawing lots for the choice of teams.

            On Monday, December 13th the women expect to settle the Asiatic question in much the same way as the League of Nations covenant was recently thrashed out.

 

12-10-1920 – Fresh-Soph Debaters Clash Monday Night: Women’s Debate Teams Oppose for First Time this Year

 

Next Monday at 8 o’clock, the Freshman debate team meets the Sophomore debate team on the question, “Resolved, That the Japanese Should Be Admitted to the United States on the Same Terms as Other Aliens.” The Freshman team consisting of Irma Martin, Katherine McGonigal, and Fern Coble have the affirmative of the question and the Sophomore team, consisting of Marjorie Palmer, Evangeline Fix and Mable Wood will uphold the negative.

 

12-17-1920 - Soph Girls Win in inter-Class Debate: First Women’s inter-class Forensic Proves Frosh Undoing

 

In the first women’s interclass debate in the history of the college, the sophomore team won from the freshmen by a 2 to 1 decision. The debate was held Monday night in the college chapel. Upholding the negative of the question, “Resolved, that the Japanese should be admitted to the United States on the same terms as other aliens,” the sophomore team, composed of Majorie Palmer, Evangeline Fix and Mabel Wood, was opposed by Irma Martin, Katherine McGonbile and Fern Coble.

            Professor L.W. Sawtelle coached the affirmative team while Miss Gardiner had charge of the sophomore debaters.

 

01-21-1921 – Co-Ed debaters preparing for Clash with U: Teams are selected from tryouts held Tuesday Evening: Contests are in March: Affirmative Team to Uphold Whitman Here – Negative at Seattle

Martha Douglas, Anne McAuley, Ruth Reynolds and Mable Wood were chosen to represent Whitman in debate this year from tryouts Tuesday. Anne McAuley debated for Whitman last year and is a member of Delta Sigma Rho.

            The debate, which will be a dual event with the University of Washington, will be held on the 11th of March. The affirmative team will debate here, while the negative team will be in Seattle.

            The question to be debated is: “Resolved: That prior to the right of strikes and lock-outs, labor and capital should be compelled to submit their differences to a board of arbitration, constitutionally granted.”

            Miss Gardiner will again coach the teams this year.

 

03-11-1921 – Whitman Women will Clash with University of Washington Tonight in Annual Dual Debate Contests: Arbitration question will be expounded tonight by debaters: Affirmative team here: Chapel expected to be full for hearing of the arguments

The only Women’s inter-collegiate debate of the year will take place tonight against the University of Washington when Martha Douglas and Anne McAuley will expound the cause of the negative of the Strike arbitration question at Seattle, and Ruth Reynolds and Mable Wood will defend the affirmative at home.

            Ruth Holland and Margaret Grimes of the University will take the negative here.

            The negative team left for Seattle last night.

            The Women’s League will entertain the visiting debaters during their stay. The dormitory girls will entertain them at dinner at Reynolds tonight, and Delta Sigma Rho will have a luncheon in their honor at noon.

            The question as stated is “Resolved that prior to the right to strike and lockout; capital and labor should be compelled to submit their disputes to arbitration, constitutionally granted.”

            The debate will be held in the chapel this evening. A reception will be held in Langdon Hall after the debate.

 

03-11-1921 – Team is Chosen for Willamette Debate – Thomas, Harper, Tate, and Warner To Compose Personnel

            Virgil Thomas of Walla Walla was selected in the try-out held Monday evening to represent Whitman in the approaching debate with Willamette University on April 22. Together with Fred Harper, Mobray Tate and Prentiss Warner he will compose the teams.

            Thomas has had considerable experience in debating, though with other members of the team it will be his first appearance in a varsity contest. He was a member of the freshman debate team which defeated the Sophomores earlier in the school year. In addition to this he has had two year’s experience in interscholastic debate gained while representing Walla Walla High School. Whitman will thus be well represented in the coming contest as the other three members of the team secured valuable experience while working as alternates on the University of Washington Team.

 

03-18-1921 – Whitman Wins Co-Ed Debate: Superior Argument Wins Contest for Home Team – Team at Seattle Loses

The dual Co-ed debate of Whitman College and the University of Washington was held last Friday, March 11 in Memorial Hall. At home, the question, “Resolved: That prior to the right to strike or lockout, capital and labor should be compelled to submit their disputes to an arbitration board, constitutionally waived,” was ably debated by Ruth Reynolds and Mabel Wood, for the affirmative, and by Margaret Grimes and Ruth Holland, for the negative. Whitman won the decision on the side of the affirmative by a vote of two to one.

            Judge E. C. Mills was chairman of the debates. The decision was rendered by C. F. Vandewater, J.G. Kelly, and Miss Gertrude Maxwell of the Walla Walla High School Faculty.

            Before the opening of the debate musical numbers were rendered by a double quartet selected from the members of the Women’s Glee Club.

            At Seattle, Martha Douglas and Annie McAulay upheld the negative side of the same question, and Margaret Stuart and Irene Burns debated the affirmative for the University. The vote of two to one was in favor of the affirmative.

 

04-15-1921 – Debaters Leave for Willamette Contest: Thomas and Harper Compose Affirmative Team at Salem.

Virgil Thomas and Fred Harper will compose the affirmative team which will go to Salem on April 22 to meet Willamette University in dual debate. Mobray Tate and Prentiss Warner will remain at home and uphold the negative case.

            Judges have not yet been chosen for the contest. The men should make a good showing in this contest as they have had much time for preparation and gained valuable experience while serving as alternates against the University of Washington.

 

04-22-1921 – Clash Tonight is With Willamette: Whitman Debaters to Argue with Southerners in Memorial

            Whitman meets Willamette University in dual debate tonight, on the question: “Resolved, that immigration from Southeastern Europe should be prohibited.”

            Mowbray Tate, ’23, and Prentiss Warner, ’23, will uphold the negative at home for Whitman. Frank Benett and Bernard Ramsey will uphold the affirmative for Willamette here.

            Fred Harper, ’22, and Virgil Thomas, ’24 will represent Whitman at Salem and they will be opposed by Robert Notson and Sheldon Sackett.

            Judges of the debate to be held tonight in memorial Hall are Rev. Reichart, Pastor of the First Presbyterian church, N.A. Davis, Assistant Cachier of the Baker-Boyer Bank, and City Commissioner Grova Cookerly.

 

04-29-1921 – Honors Divided by Debate Team: Both decisions are unanimous and Both Teams Win at Home

            Whitman divided honors with Willamette in the dual debate last Friday night. The negative team won at home, while the affirmative lost to the Bearcat debaters at Salem.

            The same question was discussed that was used in the debate with the University of Washington, “Resolved that immigration from Southeastern Europe would be prohibited.”

            Prentiss Warner and Mowbray Tate upheld the negative at home for Whitman and won the fourth victory in debate which has been secured for Whitman this year. Tate, the first Whitman speaker at home showed a large number of the people from several of the principal countries of Southeastern Europe were desirable immigrants. He further showed that at the present time there was a need of immigrants in the industry of the country.

            Warner, second negative speaker for Whitman, pointed out the discrimination that the United States would be practicing should she adopt a policy that would entirely exclude Southeastern Europeans. He then brought forward the plan of the negative which provided for a federal commission which would select the immigrants from various countries according to their assimilability and employability.

            Fred Harper and Virgil Thomas upheld the affirmative for Whitman at Willamette. In this debate Whitman lost by a two-to-one decision. The affirmative at Salem contended that there was little necessity for immigration at the present time, and also that a continuance of the great flood of immigrants from Southeastern Europe would mean a decadence in the American race.

 

Team Results

 

IV. Debate at Whitman College

            A. A chapter of Delta Sigma Rho, a national honorary debating society was established

on campus, making Whitman only one of four schools on the West coast to have a chapter. Delta Sigma Rho abolished First year participation on the Varsity debate teams, but founded an on campus First year-Sophomore debate to allow First years some practice before they tried out for the varsity team.

B. Harper Joy was the president of debate, Sidonie Pyle was the Vice-President, Ralph Cordiner was the treasurer was the secretary, and Elizabeth Peters was the Treasurer.

C. The women’s debate coach was Miss Dorothy Gardine

D. The men’s debate coach, new to Whitman, was Mr. L. T. Sawtelle. His teaching of a ‘conversational style of delivery’ was cited as a key reason for the team’s success.

E. Intercollegiate Debate

1. In the first competition of the year, the men debated “R: That immigration from Southeastern Europe should be restricted.” Halbert Holmes and Chester Lesh defeated the University of Washington on the affirmative on a 2-1 decision in Walla Wall while Robert Brode and Edwin Ford won 2-1 on the negative in Seattle.

2. In the only women’s competition of the year, two Whitman teams debated the topic: “Resolved: That prior to the right of strike or lockout, labour and capital should be compelled to submit their disputes to arbitration, constitutionally waived.” At Whitman, Ruth Reynolds and Mabel Woods defeated the University of Washington 2-1 on the affirmative. In Seattle, Annie McAulay and Martha Douglas lost on the negative in a 2-1 decision.

3. In the only other men’s tournament of the semester, with Williamette, the same resolution was debated on the affirmative by Fred Harper and Virgil Thomas at Salem, and Mowbray Tate and Prentice Warner at home.

F. On campus forensics.

1. The First years men beat the Sophomore team unanimously. They were on the affirmative side of the resolution: “Resolved: That the United States should enter the League of Nations exactly as it stands on the Versailles covenant.” Sophomore debaters were Grant Beam, Chester Lesh and Joseph Tewinkel. First years were Virgil Thomas, Gordon Gilmore and Arthur Douglas.

 

 

 

 

 

*Taken from: http://www.multied.com/dates/1920.html