1918-1919 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

Professor Milton Simpson

 

Whitman News

 

Speech in the English Department News

p. 78-79

Department of English

Professor DAVIS, Associate Professor SIMPSON, Miss GABDINBB

Courses 1, 2, and 6 of this department are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Courses I and 6 are required of Freshmen. Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 21 are given every year. In the year 1919-29, Courses 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, and 19 will also be offered.

MAJOR COURSES.—Students who select English as their major study may take either of the following major courses:

1. A. General Major Course, of 44 hours, including 6 hours of advanced writing and speaking.

2. A. Major for Teachers, of 48 hours, including Courses 3 or 4, 10, 11, and 21.

COURSES IN WRITING

1. Written Composition. This course aims to stimulate independent and clear thinking and to develop skill in writing. Themes are required and reading suited to the class is prescribed. Weekly conferences on themes are required in addition to the hours of recitation. Two hours, first and second terms. Required of Freshmen.

1b. Written Composition. This course is a continuation of Course 1.

Two hours, third term.

Required of Sophomores.

3. Narrative Writing. This course is devoted primarily to the writing of various types of narratives. In connection with the writing assigned a study is made of the principles of narrative structure.

Two hours, first term. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

4. An Introduction to Journalism. This course is devoted to practice in journalistic writing.

Two hours, second term.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

5. Advanced Composition. Usually exposition and essay writing are given chief attention in this course. Two hours, third term. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

COURSES IN SPEAKING

Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Coarse ]. in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits.

One hour, first, second, and third terms.

Required of Freshmen.

7. Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically.

Two hours, first and second terms.

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

Omitted in 1919-1920.]

8. Public Speaking. This course is devoted chiefly to the composition and the delivery of occasional speeches and short orations.

Two hours, first term.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

9. Literary Interpretation. This course is intended primarily to meet the needs of students who expect to become teachers of literature.

Two hours, second term.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

Drill is given to all speakers who compete in contests and to those who appear on the Commencement program.

COURSES IN LITERAURE

10. Old English. This course includes an introduction to the study of language, a study of the linguistic principles involved in the development of English, and a brief historical survey of the literature of Old English with the reading of selections in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Header.

Three hours, first term.

Required of prospective teachers of English.

11. Chaucer. This course includes the reading of Chaucer's important works and selections from the Metrical Romances and Piers the Plowman. Some attention is also given to the language of Chaucer. Three hours, second term. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

Award of Honors 1918

The William Thomas Dovell Prizes in Oratory—Divided between ALAN REYNOLDS THOMPSON, Class of 1919 and GRACE YOLKTAI LEE, Class of 1921

The Christopher Columbus Gose Prizes in History—First, FAYE EMNOBE BBHNEATJ, Class of 1919, Second, HELEN LUCILE Ross) Class of 1920

The John Brining Prizes in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking-First, MABION EUGENE DICKEY, Class of 1921, Second, JOSEPH QAISEB, Class of 1921

 

1918

Note-First year of Dovell-Gose

THE WILLIAM THOMAS DOVELL PRIZES IN ORATORY.—Members of the Board of Overseers have offered two prizes of fifty dollars and twenty-five dollars each in memory of the late William Thomas Dovell, a member of the class of 1888, upon the following conditions:

The prizes shall be awarded upon the basis of an oratorical contest to be held during Commencement week, provided that at least four contestants participate. The contest is open to members of the sopho­more, junior, and senior classes. The orations are limited to two thousand words, the subjects being selected from a list announced by the head of the English Department not later than December first. If more than six contestants submit orations, they shall present them to the head of the English Department not later than April fifteenth for submission to a board of judges on thought and composition who shall select the six best orations for the Commencement contest. The judges on thought and on delivery will be selected by a committee consisting of the President of the College and the heads of the English and History Departments.

 

THE CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS GOSE PRIZES IN HISTORY.— Members of the Board of Overseers have established prizes of fifty dollars and twenty-five dollars each in honor of the late Christopher Columbus Gose, a member of the class of 1886, upon the following conditions:

The prizes are to be awarded at Commencement on the basis of com­petitive essays on historical -subjects. The contest is open to students who shall have completed at least four semesters of work in History by Commencement. Subjects for essays will be posted by the head of the History Department on December first. The selection of subjects will be made at the opening of the second semester, and the essays handed in on or before May tenth. The judges will be appointed by a committee consisting of the President and the heads of the History and English Departments. The award will be based upon thoroughness of research and originality. At least four contestants must participate.

The John Brining Award-same as in 1917

 

English Department requirements and class offerings

5.  Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. lit is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course 1 in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking. One hour, both semesters. Required of Freshmen.

4.  Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. In the first semester the chief emphasis is upon written argument; in the second semester, upon oral debate and other forms of public address. Two hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

1917 Awards

The John Brining Prizes in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking—

First, ROBERT BARTON PORTEKFIELD, Class of 1920

Second, CHARLES DAVID GAFFNEY, Class of 1920

 

1919

The William Thomas Dovell Prizes in Oratory—same as in 1918

The John Brining Extemporaneous Speaking Contest—same as in 1917

English Department Speech Courses

 

COURSES IN SPEAKING

6.    Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course 1 in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits.

One hour, first, second, and third terms.

Required of Freshmen.

7. Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course is not so much to develop shill in formal debate ns to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically.

Two hours, first and second terms.

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

Omitted in 1919-1920.]

8.      Public Speaking. This course is devoted chiefly to the composition and the delivery of occasional speeches and short orations.

Two hours, first term.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

9.      Literary Interpretation. This course is intended primarily to meet the needs of students who expect to become teachers of literature.

Two hours, second term.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

Drill is given to all speakers who compete in contests and to those who appear on the Commencement program.

 

Awards 1918

The William Thomas Dovell Prizes in Oratory— Divided between ALAN REYNOLDS THOMPSON, Class of 1919 and GRACE YOLKTAI LEE, Class of 1921

The John Brining Prizes in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking— First, MARION EUGENE DICKEY, Class of 1921 Second, JOSEPH GRISER, Class of 1921

 

World News

A. The Treaty of Brest Litovsk is signed, “between the central powers (Germany, Austria, Hungary, Turkey and Bulgaria) and the Soviet government.”

B. The Battle of Marne occurs. It “was a massive attempt by the Germans to breakthrough on the West before American forces could arrive in large numbers.”

      C. The Battle of Argonne Forest takes place.

      D. “On October 28th, the German fleet mutinied in Kiel.”

E. “President Woodrow Wilson put forth fourteen points that he believed could be the basis for a settlement of the Great War.”

      F. “Poland declared its independence on October 6, 1918.”

      G. “The U.S. intervenes in Russia.”

H. “Czechoslovakia declared its independence as a new nation and was recognized rapidly by France, Great Britain and the United States.”

I. “November 11th, an armistice was signed, bringing the war in Europe to a conclusion.”

J. “The US Post Office began the first regularly-scheduled air mail service on May 15th, between New York and Washington.”

 

Team News

 

CO-ED DEBATE SEASON

Ketit, Lee, Matthies and Pyle to Debate Saturday, April 26.

The following students have been chosen to represent Whitman in the Co-ed dual debate with the University of Washington to be staged April 26

Mildred Kent ‘22 of Walla Walla;

Grace Lee '22 of Portland;

Myrtle Matthies '22 of Pomeroy, and

Sidonie Pyle '22 of Walla Walla, with Margaret Schiffner and Ruth Gilmore as alternates.

The judges of the try-outs were Professors Bells, Bratton and Eleakney.

The question to be debated is: "Resolved: That the immigration bill, prohibiting immigration to this country for four years, which has been placed before Congress, should be enacted."

Considerable work has been done in the working out of the bibliography and points of issues of this question.

Every member is going into the work with great enthusiasm. Although the prowess of the Co-ed debaters has not been tested in college debates, the spirit with which they are going about the preparation of the debate points very favorably to the prospects of bringing victory to Whitman again.

Professor Milton Simpson will coach the Co-ed debate teams.

 

 

Bean, Douglas, R. Garver and McGahey to Debate On March 14.

As the result of the debate try-out held on Wednesday afternoon, February 19th, the following men were chosen to represent Whitman College, in intercollegiate debate: Harold McGahey, '22 and Glen Bean '21, of Walla Walla; William Orville Douglas '20, of Yakima and Robert Garver ‘19, of Waitsburg; Robert Brode '21 and Howard Reed '21, are alternates.

From the beginning of his college course William Orville Douglas has allied himself with debating interests. In his freshman year it was he who helped to hold up the principles of the democratic party in a college political debate, and since then he has been a member of two inter-collegiate debate teams. Robert Carver was a Whitman debater last year, and before entering Whitman he had had previous intercollegiate experience elsewhere. Harold McGahey has had no training in college debates but he has a high school record behind him which speaks well for his future. Moreover, he has inspired sufficient confidence in his timid classmates to be elected president of the Freshman Discussion club, and if he can provoke such confidence In forty freshmen boys, what can he not do to three mere judges. The debate prowess of Glen Bean has not yet been ascertained, but it looks as if he might prove more than satisfactory.

The two teams were selected from among fourteen contestants, eight of whom—the Judges stated—were first team material. The affirmative team will debate in Walla Walla on Friday, March 14th, and the negative team will debate in Seattle on the same date. The question chosen for the men's debate is: Resolved, That the United States should enact legislation submitting all disputes to compulsory arbitration. Work has begun at once under the direction of Professor Milton Simpson, the debate coach.

 

DEBATE CLUB HOLDS BANQUET

FAREWELL TO COACH SIMPSON AND TO ENCOURAGE COLLEGE DEBATE.

On Monday night the debate society of Whitman college held a banquet in Reynolds hall that was in the nature of a farewell to the coach. Prof. M, S. Simpson, who leaves Whitman this year to become the head of the English department in Kalamazoo college. Prof. Simpson has coached the college teams for the last three years with remarkable success, and is with genuine regret that the students, faculty, and town people see him leave the community. The new debate society was formed for the purpose of encouraging debate in Whitman and of inducing high school debates to enter the college. The society is considering petitioning a national debate fraternity for membership. All intercollegiate debaters recommended by the coach are eligible to membership, as are alumni debaters! And members of the faculty by a two thirds vote of the society. The subjects of all toasts at the banquet were taken from the terms of the treaty of peace. The program follows: "The League of Nations," Mirian; Smith; "Disarmament," Edwin Ford "Self-Determination," Grace Lee "Open Diplomacy," Frances Penrose "Boundariee," Qlenin Bean; '"Final Court or Appeal," George Marquis.

 

IED DEBATE IS BEING PLANNED

The University of Washington Invites Contest on the Rostrum.

The University of Washington has sent word to Whitman, that she would like to meet her again this year in a field of girls debate.

Accordingly a meeting was held after chapel on Wednesday morning, January 8th, to discuss the prospects for this year, but although every girl signifies her desire to have an intercollegiate debate this season, not one was brave enough to stand before the assembly as a would-be debater. To stir up enthusiasm Professor Simpson, the debate coach and chairman of the meeting, called upon last year's four debaters against the University, and Alma Smith, Frances Penrose, Miriam Smith, and Hilda Dirks spoke briefly on the thorough enjoyment and the splendid training that their experience In debate gave them. A committee consisting of a member of each class was finally appointed to canvass the girls of the college to see who would be willing to enter debate try-outs. Thus far a definite report has not been hindered in by the committee, but a number of girls have agreed to compete in debate.

 

INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATE

The general consensus of opinion throughout the college in regard to debate is that it is a field in which the individual grinds his head off for a month or more, without enjoyment or compensation, of any sort,—all for the purpose of haranguing for an hour before three Judges and an unsympathetic audience,—and in the end being declared vanquished because two of the judges couldn't see It your way. Hinder such a delusion it is no wonder that more students do not take an interest in debate! And it is a delusion on their part, and the sooner they get rid of it the better. Who  there whose blood does not warm 'at the thought of a close, exciting contest? Debating is a contest of the finest, keenest sort, not of brawn, but of brains. It is a battle of words, not of throwing baskets or making touch downs. Nor does it lack employment and compensation. For all the enthusiasm and interest are centered in a debate question fully as in playing in athletic game. Then, too, there is a satisfaction for knowing that you are able to discuss a question thoroughly,—that you know the fine points of the game. And as to the time and labor expended, you feel that it has been thoroughly well spent and to what better advantage could one wish to spend his days!

 

DEBATE CLUB TO PETITION NATIONAL

A DELTA SIGMA RHO FRATERNITY MAY BE INSTITUTED AT WHITMAN SOON.

Last Tuesday afternoon the Whitman inter-collegiate debaters met at Memorial hall with their coaches, Prof. M. B. Simpson and Miss Dorothy Gardiner, and organized the Debating Society of Whitman College with the aim of stimulating debating in Whitman College and attracting high school debaters here. The following officers were elected: President, William Orville Douglas; vice-president, Mildred Kent; secretary, Glen Bean; treasurer, Hilda Dirks.

Petition Delta Sigma Rho.

The debate society will petition for a charter from a national debate society—the one now under consideration is Delta Sigma Rho—a high standing national whose charter is sought by all the large universities of the country. The only chapter of Delta Sigma Rho west of the Rockies it at Stanford. With the splendid debate records behind the active members of this club, it is anticipated that Whitman will again be honored by admission into the circle of a high standing national fraternity. One of the features of the club will be its annual banquets. A committee has been appointed to arrange for a banquet during the latter part of May.

Charter Members.

'The charter members of the club are: Prof. M. B. Simpson, Miss Dorothy Gardiner, Glen Bean, William Orville Douglas, Hilda Dirks, Edwin Ford, Robert Garver, Mildred Kent, Grace Lee, Harold McGahey, Myrtle Matthies, Frances Penrose, Robert Porterfleld, Sidonie Pyle, Alma Smith and Miriam Smith.

 

WHITMAN DEBATE TEAMS WIN FROM U. OF W. IN ANNUAL DUAL DEBATE

Affirmative is Victorious—Unanimous Decision.

 

SUPERIOR REFUTATION

Victory Due to Coaching of Professor Simpson.

 

William Orville Douglas and Harold McGahey, representing Whitman, defeat the University of Washington team Friday night in the first forensic contest of the year. Washington was presented by Gunar Berg and Steele Wednesday. The decision of the judges is unanimous for Whitman. At the time Robert W. Garver and Glen, representing Whitman, defeated the University of Washington team Seattle by a 2 to 1 decision. The question debated was: "Resolved, That a Federal Board of Arbitration should have compulsory powers to settle Industrial disputes between capital and labor," The home team in each debate upheld the affirmative.

Professor W. C. Bells acted as chair-in of the debate at Walla Walla.

 

The Judges were Judge Edward C. Ells of Walla Walla, Judge Chester Miller of Dayton, and Rev. Bertand Warren of Walla Walla.

In the opening speech, McGahey set the history of industrial disputes between capital and labor, both in the United States and in foreign countries, showed the menaces of World War I.

Bolsheviki organizations and that public opinion demanded a practical method of settling industrial disputes.

His proposition was further developed by Douglas, who showed that compulsory arbitration Is an immediate method of sound principle settling industrial disputes between capital and labor.

 

The Washington debaters argued the negative side in an excellent and spirited manner but were unable to survive the onslaughts of the Whitman team. The refutation speeches were specimens of real oratory on both sides, William Orville Douglas for Whitman distinguished himself in the rebuttal. This was Doug's third appearance in debate for Whitman. McGahey is a freshman and from his excellent showing this year will be one of Whitman's mainstays In the future. Bob Garver and Glen Bean deserve great credit for taking the scalp of the enemy in his own camp. It has been re years since Whitman defeated the University in both contests of the annual dual debate. This is Bob's second year in debate. He will graduate In June. This was the first intercollegiate debate for Bean under the Whitman colors.

Let's give three cheers for Douglas, Jver, McGahey and Bean, and for Zach Simpson. They worked hard and faithfully to bring victory to Whitman.

 

Commencement Speakers.

Helen Ross and Alan Thompson of the Senior class will be Commencement speakers at the coming Commencement exercises In June, according to announcement made by the faculty. William Orville Douglas of the Junior class was chosen as Commencement marshal.

 

 

PROFESSOR DAVIS SPEAKS BEFORE Y. W.

The weekly meeting of the YWCA was held late Friday afternoon at Reynolds hall. There was an unusually large number of the co-eds present. Professor W. R. Davis spoke upon the subject "God as Victor." As always, Professor Davis brought vital and encouraging messages to his audience.

 

MILDRED KENT AND SIDONIE PYLE TAKE WASHINGTON TO DEFEAT HERE

FOURTH STRAIGHT VICTORY

MYRTLE MATTHIES AND GRACE LEE WIN AT SEATTLE—3 FRESHMEN ON TEAMS.

 

It Pays to Advertise.

Harper Joy recently brought to the Pioneer "office" an ancient copy of the Spokane Falls Evening- Chronicle. It is a four-page Issue about half the size of the Pioneer. On the second page is a Whitman College advertisement telling of the beginning of the fifth term. The courses of study included "Classical, scientific, normal, business elocution, surveying, French, German, drawing, painting, instrumental music and voice culture." It advertised that there were 179 students the previous year, which made an unusually large college at that time. Dr. A. J. Anderson was then president. The issue of the Chronicle referred to was published on September 21, 1886, when Washington was only a Territory.

 

Whitman College took the University of Washington to her fourth consecutive defeat in intercollegiate debate Tuesday night when the Whitman teams, both here and at Seattle, romped away with both contests of the annual dual co-ed debate.

The subject for debate was: "Resolved, that all immigration should be prohibited for four years." The home team in each debate upheld the affirmative.

Whitman Debaters Forceful.

The Whitman team which won the victory from the Seattle Institution here consisted of Miss Sidonie Pyle and Miss Mildred Kent. The Washington debaters were Miss Florabelle Ludington and Miss Vivian Kellam. Miss Ludington attended Whitman during her freshman year. The judges were the Rev. W.C. Gilmore of Dayton, Leigh H. Iravine of Walla Walla, and the Rev. T.W. Lane of Walla Walla.

A full audience was present in J Memorial hall to hear the Whitman debaters drive their way to undoubted victory with clean and conclusive argument. The Whitman co-eds were particularly forceful in rebuttal.

Make 9th Victory.

 

Team Results

I.                 Debate at Whitman College

a.     The Debate Team petitions for a Delta Sigma Rho Charter on May 15, 1919.

b.     Whitman Debate wins every debate of the year. However, there were only 4 debates all year due to the quarantine and the war.

c.      The Men’s debate topic was; Resolved: that the United States should enact legislation submitting all disputes to compulsory arbitration.

d.     The Women’s debate topic was; Resolved: that the immigration bill, prohibiting immigration to this country for four years, which has been placed before Congress, should be enacted.

e.     The University of Washington debated the Whitman College men in 2 separate debates on March 14th, one occurring at the University of Washington and one at Whitman. Whitman debaters Harold McGahey and William Orville Douglas win on a 3-0 decision and Glen Bean and Robert Garver win on a 2-1 decision in Seattle.

f.       The University of Washington debated the Whitman College women on April 26th, with the same arrangement of locations. Whitman’s women debaters win both debates on a 2-1 decision with Mildred Kent and Sidonie Pyle as partners and Grace Lee and Myrtle Matthies as partners.

g.     It had been 5 years since Whitman had won both the men’s and women’s debates with the University of Washington.