1917-1918 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

Milton Simpson

 

Whitman News

I. Whitman College in 1917-18

A. Two faculty members were drafted into the war (WW I).

1. Professor David Campbell, head of the Music Conservatory.

2. Professor Borleske, athletics.

B. Dr. Penrose was the college president.

C. ASWC

1. Joseph Johnson became president following Sylvia Van Hollebeke’s resignation.

2. Sylvia Van Hollebeke became Vice President.

D. Professor Milton Simpson served as debate coach.

 

II. At Whitman College

A. The PIO printed a roll call of students abroad fighting WWI

B. New Clubs at Whitman

1. A Patriotic League was formed at Whitman. They worked with the Walla Walla community, and made flags.

2. Citing a need for more Christianity on campus, a chapter of YMCA was formed.

3. A ROTC unit was formed, with used carbine rifles supplied by the Washington state guard.

4. Beta Sigma Sorority became Kappa Kappa Gamma when it joined the national sorority.

C. The seventieth anniversary of the Whitman Massacre was observed.

 

Speech in the English Department News

p. 80-81

 

Professor DAVIS, Associate Professor SIMPSON, Miss COBB

Courses 1a, 1b, and 5 of this department are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Courses la and 5 are required of Freshmen. Courses 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 7a, and 7b are given every year. In the year 1918-1919, Courses 4, 8, 11, 19, 17, and 20 will also be offered. Students who select English as their major study will take thirty-two hours chosen from the courses given in this department. It is recommended that these courses be distributed as follows: Composition, four hours (not including Courses la and lb); Old English and Middle English, six hours; Periods of Modern Literature, nine hours; the Drama, six hours; the Novel, Contemporary Literature, American literature, and the Teaching of English, six hours.

 

1a. Written Composition. This course aims to stimulate independent and clear thinking and to develop skill in writing. Instruction is given to meet the needs of the class. Themes are required and reading suited to the class is prescribed. Weekly conferences on themes are required in addition to the two hours of recitation. Two hours, first semester. Required of Freshmen. Written Composition. This course is a continuation of la. Two hours, second semester. Required of Sophomores.

 

5. Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course 1 in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking. One hour, both semesters. Required of Freshmen.

 

Composition. A course in writing for advanced students. The needs of the class determine the nature of the course. One semester is devoted to practice in journalistic writing. Two hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. In the first semester the chief emphasis is upon written argument; in the second semester, upon oral debate and other forms of public address. Two hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches. Two hours, second semester. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Omitted in 1918-1919.]

 

A General View of English Literature. This course provides an introduction to the essay, the drama, and the novel. Three hours, second semester. Open to Freshmen.

 

A General View of English Literature. This course provides an introduction to lyric poetry. Three hours, first semester. Open to Sophomores.

 

English Literature from 1651 to 1660. In this course special attention is given to the works of Spenser, Bacon, and Milton. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first semester. Omitted in 1918-1919.]

 

English Literature from 1660 to 1798. This course is a survey of the chief writers of the period. Three hours) second semester. Omitted in 1918-1919.]

 

English Literature from 1198 to 18S2. The poetry and prose of the Romantic period. Three hours, first semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

p. 104

 

Award of Honors 1917

The John Brining Prizes in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking

First, ROBERT BARTON POBTERRIBLD, Class of 1920

Second, CHARLES DAVID GAFI-NEY, Class of 1920

 

1917

 

THE JOHN BRINING EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING CONTEST.— Mr. John Brining of Dayton, Washington, offers two prizes of fifteen and ten dollars, respectively, to winners in a speaking contest open to members of the freshman class. The contest is held during Commencement week. Contestants receive their subjects three hours before they speak. In preparation of their speeches they are not permitted to consult any person.

 

1917- College Organizations

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general athletic, social, musical, and debating activities of the student body.

 

Requirements and course options for the English Department

4. Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. In the first semester the chief emphasis is upon written argument; in the second semester, upon oral debate and other forms of public address.

Two hours, both semesters.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

Omitted in 1917-1918.]

 

6. Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches.

Two hours, second semester.

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

 

Award of Honors 1916

The John Brining Prize in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking

First, EDITH PALMER MASON, Class of 1919.

Second, GEOROE EDOAR CLARK, Class of 1919

 

1918

 

Note-First year of Dovell-Gose

Prizes

THE WILLIAM THOMAS DOVELL PRIZES IN ORATORY.—Members of the Board of Overseers have offered two prizes of fifty dollars and twenty-five dollars each in memory of the late William Thomas Dovell, a member of the class of 1888, upon the following conditions:

The prizes shall be awarded upon the basis of an oratorical contest to be held during Commencement week, provided that at least four contestants participate. The contest is open to members of the sopho­more, junior, and senior classes. The orations are limited to two thousand words, the subjects being selected from a list announced by the head of the English Department not later than December first. If more than six contestants submit orations, they shall present them to the head of the English Department not later than April fifteenth for submission to a board of judges on thought and composition who shall select the six best orations for the Commencement contest. The judges on thought and on delivery will be selected by a committee consisting of the President of the College and the heads of the English and History Departments.

 

THE CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS GOSE PRIZES IN HISTORY— Members of the Board of Overseers have established prizes of fifty dollars and twenty-five dollars each in honor of the late Christopher Columbus Gose, a member of the class of 1886, upon the following conditions:

The prizes are to be awarded at Commencement on the basis of competitive essays on historical -subjects. The contest is open to students who shall have completed at least four semesters of work in History by Commencement. Subjects for essays will be posted by the head of the History Department on December first. The selection of subjects will be made at the opening of the second semester, and the essays handed in on or before May tenth. The judges will be ap­pointed by a committee consisting of the President and the heads of the History and English Departments. The award will be based upon thoroughness of research and originality. At least four contestants must participate.

 

The John Brining Award-same as in 1917

 

 

English Department requirements and class offerings

5.      Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. lit is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course 1 in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking.

One hour, both semesters.

Required of Freshmen.

 

4.     Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. In the first semester the chief emphasis is upon written argument; in the second semester, upon oral debate and other forms of public address.

Two hours, both semesters.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

1917 Awards

The John Brining Prizes in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking—

First, ROBERT BARTON PORTEKFIELD, Class of 1920

Second, CHARLES DAVID GAFFNEY, Class of 1920

 

World News

 

·        1917

A. “First U.S. combat troops in France as U.S. declares war on Germany.” *

B. The Russian Revolution of 1917 occurs. Bolsheviks seize power and the Czar is overthrown.

      C. “Balfour Declaration promises Jewish homeland in Palestine.” *

      D. “U.S. declares war on Austria-Hungary.” *

E. “Armistice between new Russian Bolshevik government and Germans” takes place.

      F. “Sigmund Freud's Introduction to Psychoanalysis” is published.

      G. “Mexico establishes a liberal constitution.” *

H. “In the United States Congress passes an 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which prohibits the manufacture, sale or transportation of intoxicating liquors.” *

 

 

Team News

November 30, 1917

Freshman Hold Peppy Meeting

Discussion club program is impetus for new organization

 

December 14, 1917

College Debate Team is chosen

Four Men and an Alternate Picked for contest with Washington

In the debate tryouts held Tuesday afternoon, R. Butch, R. Garver, Hurd Porterfield and William O. Douglas as alternate were chosen by Judges Prof. W. S. Eells, Pres. S. B. L. Penrose and Prof. W. M. Bleakney to represent Whitman in the Washington debate which is to be held in January.

There was no lack of material from which the judges might choose, there being some fourteen contestants for the possible four positions. The contestants were paired off in twos, each contestant having a five minute main speech and a three minute rebuttal. The line-up consists almost entirely of upper classmen and men who have had considerable experience. Although the freshmen are not represented on the team this year, there were a number of them who showed their school spirit by coming out to the tryouts.

In spite of the fact that few under classmen are represented on the teams there is some excellent material among them which will undoubtedly be of service to Whitman in the future.

 

January 18, 1918

Coed Debaters chosen

Pep Shown by the Girls at the Tryout Pleases Faculty Immensely

The debate tryout for the girls took place Tuesday afternoon. Frances Penrose, alma Smith, Hilda dirks and Miriam Smith were chosen as the two teams with Neva Martin as alternate. Prof. Bratton, Pro. Bleakney and Prof. Eels acted as judges.

The ten girls who tried out for the places all showed good work. The pep and enthusiasm displayed were unusual for girls’ debate. Experienced members of the faculty say that it is the best tryout they are ever seen among the girls. The prospects are favorable for a good showing.

 

March 1, 1918

Whitman Debaters Have Good Trip to Sound City

Porterfield and Douglas Relate experience of interesting trip to coast

On Wednesday night, February 21st, we left Walla Walla for the verbal combat with our ancient foes in Seattle. About four o’clock in the morn, I was awakened from peaceful slumbers by diverse exclamations and execrations. Peering out between the curtains of my berth I perceived a man (clad in ultra-negligee attire) picking himself up slowly from the isle in front of my colleague’s berth, from which were issued profuse explanations and apologies. “What’s the matter?” I said to Doug, aiming to inquire into the thinly clad gentleman’s precipitous descent from his upper berth and the ensuing near riot. And I learned that the aforesaid gentleman in facilitating his descent from the upper berth, had placed his stocking clad foot upon Doug’s bed. Whereupon Doug immediately awoke and thinking that some black Ethiopian porter was prowling about immediately he grasped hold of the elusive black object and upset the aforesaid gentleman’s balance. I then remembered how some of our fellow students from Spokane were once robbed of their valuables during their Pullman slumbers by a dusky porter.

Aside from this incident and the fact that the man above me found some of my pencils in his shoe in the morning, the trip passed without incident. In Seattle, Doug and I chanced to visit the Wilson Business College and there met Miss Marion Forney and Blanche Mitchell, two of last year’s co-eds. In the afternoon, the Seattle debaters, both of whom are members of Delta Kappa Epsilon, took us on an auto ride through the city. Doug took dinner at the Delta Chi house and at the Deke house.

Then comes the sad part of the tale. We debated. Our confidence in victory was high and it was heightened by an assurance on the part of our opponents that we had won. But the decision came 2 to 1 and it was over. We then sallied forth to drown our sorrow.

Friday morning and afternoon “Hooray” Johnson took us around the city in his car. “Hooray” is on a steel rivet crew in the Seattle Ship Construction Company works and we got an idea of one of Seattle’s greatest industries.

In the afternoon we journeyed to Camp Lewis. We made straight for the camp Library where Professor Ruby, the librarian and Leo Etzkorn, ’19, his assistant welcomed us with open arms. During our stay here we met with several Whitmanites.

 

March 1, 1918

Whitman Debaters Defeated twice

University defeats Garver, Butsch, Porterfield and Douglas

In the annual debate with the University of Washington on Thursday, February 21, Whitman’s two teams were defeated by the University’s orators in an interesting discussion on the subject: Resolved, That China Was Justified in Officially Protesting Against the Consummation of the Lansing-Ishil Agreement.

The U. of Washington sent its negative team composed of Phillip Martin and Eugene Vincent to debate against the Whitman affirmative team consisting of Russel Butsch and Bob Graver. The judges decided unanimously in favor of the negative. The Washington debaters were very convincing speakers and showed the result of good coaching. The Whitman men held up their side of the argument very well and the decision was awarded upon the merit of the constructive argument of the negative rater than upon the destructive. Mention should be made that what credit be given the Whitman affirmative team, a good share of it should go to the alternate, Marion Dickey, who was a great aid to both teams in the recent debate. While Whitman did not win, yet the results obtained are in every way promising of great things in the future.

At exactly the same time in Meaney Hall, in Seattle, Douglas and Porterfield were defending the negative of the same question against Headrick and Johnsen of the University of the Affirmative. The debate there was not so much a clash of facts as a cleverly designed game of oratory and sympathetic appeals to the audience. That our team had the university team outclassed in real debating was evident as stated by many who heard the same question against Heidrick decision, but there is a certain satisfaction of having debated to the final refutation. “Bob” and “Doug” both say that if they had only had “those Whitman rooters” behind them instead of the empty roars of Meaney Hall before them that the echoes of their peals of oratory would have convinced any judge of the veracity of their contentions. The judges at Seattle were Chapman, Deveny and Card, of Tacoma. The judges here were Fowler, of Lewiston, Peterson, and Pendleton and Rev. Warren, of this city.

We owe our gratitude not only to the two teams for their splendid showing in this debate but also to Prof. Simpson, whose diligence and untiring energy and efforts made our teams so well prepared in this debate. And also to Marion Dickey, the alternate, do we owe many words of appreciation for the invaluable aid he gave to the various members of the teams in his extensive research work.

Again have Whitman’s teams lived up to the standard of Whitman College and we can say that although there was defeat in both places, never the less, there was the victory of having been defeated in the real Whitman way.

 

March 1, 1918

Co-ed Debate

Owing to the extension of President Wilson, of the present law concerning distilled liquors to include brewed and malt liquors, the question decided upon for the women’s debate is out of consideration. The question as originally decided upon was, ‘Resolved That the Present legislation as regards distilled liquor should be extended to include brewed and Malt Liquor.”

At a meeting of the women debaters Wednesday afternoon it was considered wise to write to the University of Washington suggesting that the women’s debates be abandoned for this year. The reason for this step is that, owing to the men’s debates with Idaho on April 12, it would be impossible to debate with the University until the first of May. This would bring the debate too near the end of the school year. As a great deal of work has already been done by the debaters the necessary change of subject would cause them a great deal of additional word.

 

March 8, 1918

Girls May Debate

Word has been received from the debate manager of the U. of W. saying that they wish to go on with the women’s debate in spite of the fact that the question concerning malted liquors has been thrown out of consideration on account of the recent action for the president. They offered several possible questions from which the following was chosen: Resolved that the Supreme Court Be Denied the Power of Annulling legislative Acts. The girls have already started to look up material on the new question. It is to be hoped that they put up a good stiff fight and win back our lost laurels.

 

April 19, 1918

Whitman Team victorious Over Idaho Debaters here

Porterfield and Ford Defeat Idaho Team in Local debate

One-Judge system used here

Douglas and Dickey Lose to Idaho in debate Held at Moscow

Whitman debate enthusiasts had the pleasure on the night of April 12 of hearing Whitman win a decided victory over the team from the University of Idaho in the dual debate. The question was: “Resolved, That the program outlined by the American League to Enforce Peace should be adopted by international agreement at the close of the present war, the feasibility of its initiation being granted.” Edwin Ford and Robert Porterfield who upheld the affirmative, built up a strong constructive argument, which was very insufficiently met by the negative speaker, Ralph Gochnour and Carl Burke.

 

Edwin Ford, who spoke first, gave a clear and straightforward statement of why the league would be a distinct step forward in world politics. Briefly the reasons were:

1.               It is the logical next step toward world peace

2.               Some step is absolutely necessary.

3.               It is a step over The Hague conference.

4.               The council will be supported by economic and military sanctions.

5.               The nations will submit their disputes for their own interests and because they will have freely bound themselves to do so.

6.               It will codify international law.

The first speaker on the negative, Ralph Goehnour, attempted to show that the league would be impracticable because of certain difficulties of operation, such as the basis of representation and the selection of suitable judges, and challenged the affirmative to show how these difficulties could be met.

 

Robert Porterfield, in continuing for Whitman, declared that inasmuch as the feasibility of the league’s initiation was granted in the question itself, and as these difficulties must have been settled before the league’s initiation could be feasible, these objections were not pertinent to the question. He then in a forcible and witty way told how the economic and military pressure of the nations could compel a recalcitrant nation to submit to the league. An enforced delay, he said, ‘would settle many matters by giving… time for passion to subside and peaceful negotiations to have effect. Disarmament would undoubtedly be an ultimate result of the league’s operation.

 

Team Results

 

I. Debate at Whitman

A. 24 students competed in the John Brining Extemporaneous Speaking competition for freshman. Students were given three hours to prepare an eight minute speech. Robert Porterfield won.

B. Freshman organized a campus discussion club. Joseph Gaiser was elected President.

C. A Coed debate team was reinstated, with sixteen girls signing up. Frances Penrose, Alma Smith, Hilda Driks, and Miriam Smith were selected as intercollegiate competitors. Plans were made to debate UW, with the proposed resolution of: That the present legislation concerning distilled liquor be extended to include malt liquor.

D. Intercollegiate debate.

1. On March 1'st Whitman debated the University of Washington on the resolution: That China was justified in officially protesting against the consummation of the Lanshing-Ishii agreement. Douglas and Porter travelled to Seattle to debate negative, losing on a 2-1 decision. Russel Butsch and Bob Garver stayed home to debate the affirmative, losing to UW on a 3-0.

2. On April 12, Whitman debated the University of Idaho on the resolution: That the American League to enforce peace should be adopted by the nations at the close of the war. Porterfield and Ford debated the affirmative at Whitman, winning the round. Douglas and Dickey travelled to Moscow Idaho, losing the affirmative on a 3-0 there.

3. On April 26, the Whitman Woman’s team debated the University of Washington on the resolution: That the Supreme court should be denied the power to annul legislation. Debating the affirmative at Whitman, Alma Smith and Hilda Dirks dropped on a 3-0. Frances Penrose and Miriam Smith travelled to Seattle, winning on the negative with a 2-1 decision there.

C. An end of the year Debate banquet was held at the Grand Hotel. Whitman debate was incorporated as an academic fraternity there, and plans were made to attempt to join a national debate fraternity. Rob Porterfield was elected president.

 

 

 

* Taken from: http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005246.html

http://www.fsmitha.com/time20-2.htm