1916-1917 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

No picture available

Milton Simpson, Debate Coach; Acting Associate Professor of English

 

Whitman News

I. Whitman College in 1916-1917

            A. Whitman moved professors in 9 new areas

1. Walter Crosby Eels, A.M. became the new Professor of applied mathematics and drawing.

2. Charles Gourlay Goodrich, M.S. became the new Professor of German.

3. Frank Loyal Haigh, Ph.D. became the new Professor of chemistry.

4. Arthur Chester Millspaugh, Ph.D. became the new Professor of political science

5. Thomas Franklin Day, Ph.D. and acting Dean of the philosophy group became the acting Professor of philosophy.

6. Frances Rebecca Gardner, A.B. became the acting dean of women.

7. William Ezekiel Leonard, A.M. became the acting professor economics and business.

8. Arminda Lucinda Fix, B.S. became the new associate librarian after her a year of absence on leave.

9. Milton Simpson, A.M. became the new acting associate professor of English.

B. Patrick Henderson was student body president.

            C. Reverend Stephen Beasley Linnard Penrose was the college president

            D. English Professor Milton Simpson was the debate coach.

            E. Whitman College’s tuition was $100

II. At Whitman College

A.     The Pioneer ran ads for Union Pacific Railroad and Faulkenberg Jewelers

B.     The Delta Gamma sorority became established at Whitman College

C.    The big debate on campus was should Whitman men enlist into the military

A.     Freshmen were required to attend lectures every Wednesday on current events

B.     In the spring, all athletics were cancelled and all able-bodied male students were required to drill for five hours a day on Ankeny field under the direction of Army Captain Holm

 

Speech in the English Department News

p. 83-85

 

Department of English PROFESSOR DAYIS, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SIMPSON, MISS LEYDA Courses 1a, 1b, and 5 of this department are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Courses 1a and 5 are required of Freshmen. Courses 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 7a, and 7b are given every year. In the year 1917-1918, Courses 6, 12, 18, 14, 15, 16, and 20 will also be offered. Students who select English as their major study will take thirty-two hours chosen from the courses given in this depart-merit. It is recommended that these courses be distributed as follows: Composition, four hours (not including Courses 1a and 1b) ; Old English and Middle English, seven hours; Periods of Modern Literature, nine hours; the Drama, six hours; the Novel, Contemporary Literature, American Literature, and the Teaching of English, six hours.

1a. Written Composition. This course aims to stimulate independent and clear thinking and to develop skill in writing. Instruction is given to meet the needs of the class. Themes are required and reading suited to the class is prescribed. Weekly conferences on themes are required in addition to the two hours of recitation. Two hours, first semester. Required of Freshmen.

1b. Written Composition. This course is a continuation of 1a, Two hours, second semester. Required of Sophomores.

B. Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course I in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them in speaking. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking. One hour, both semesters. Required of Freshmen.

Z. Composition. A course in writing for advanced students. The needs of the class determine the nature of the course. One semester in alternate years is devoted to practice in journalistic writing, Two hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors.

Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. In the first semester the chief emphasis is upon written argument; in the second semester, upon oral debate and other forms of public address, Two hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1917-1918.

Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches. Two hours, second semester. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. .

A General View of English Literature. This course provides an introduction to the essay, the drama, and the novel. Three hours, second semester. Open to Freshmen. .

A General View of English Literature. This course provides an introduction to lyric poetry, Three hours, first semester. Open to Sophomores.

English Literature from 1557 to 1660. In this course special attention is given to the works of Spenser, Bacon, and Milton. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first semester. Omitted in 1917-1918.

 

p. 104

 

Class of 1918 The John Brining Prize in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking— First, ECITH PALMER MASOS, Class of 1919,' Second, GEORGE EDGAB. CLARK, Class of 1919

 

1917

 

Note: debate prize ends

 

 

THE JOHN BRINING EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING CONTEST.— Mr. John Brining of Dayton, Washington, offers two prizes of fifteen and ten dollars, respectively, to winners in a speaking contest open to members of the freshman class. The contest is held during Commencement week. Contestants receive their subjects three hours before they speak. In preparation of their speeches they are not permitted to consult any person.

 

1917- College Organizations

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general athletic, social, musical, and debating activities of the student body.

 

Requirements and course options for the English Department

 [4. Argumentation and Debate. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. In the first semester the chief emphasis is upon written argument; in the second semester, upon oral debate and other forms of public address.

Two hours, both semesters.

Open to Juniors and Seniors.

Omitted in 1917-1918.]

 

6. Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches.

Two hours, second semester.

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

 

Award of Honors 1916

The John Brining Prize in Freshman Extemporaneous Speaking—

First, EDITH PALMER MASON, Class of 1919.’

Second, GEOROE EDOAR CLARK, Class of 1919

 

 

World News

II.               In the world

A.      President Woodrow Wilson narrowly wins re-election with the campaign slogan "He kept us out of war."

B.     Margaret Sanger opens the first American birth-control clinic in Brooklyn. It is raided by police, and Sanger is jailed for thirty days.

C.    The U.S. declares war on Germany in response to its policy of unrestricted submarine warfare.

D.    The war infiltrates music; popular songs include ``Over There'' by George M. Cohan and ``You're In The Army Now'' by Isham Jones.

E.     West Indian black nationalist Marcus Garvey moves to New York and opens an American branch of his Universal Negro Improvement Association.

 

Team News

 

Prospects Are Good for Victory Again; Lasts Contests

All Won Unanimously

 

Due to some mistake, the results of the tryouts for the two men's intercollegiate debate teams were not reported, in last week's issue. However, better late than never. In one of the most hotly contested try-outs ever held in the school, Emory Hoover, Earl Stimson, Arthur Lee and Clarence Ludwig landed places from among twelve contestants competing in the finals. The question was "Preparedness," and was hotly contested. Each man upheld one side of the question, Professors Braton, Russell, Boas and Davis acted as judges. Those making places on the team are old hands at the art, two of them be old hands at the art, two of them debating letter men, the others having experience in College and high school debate. Emory Hoover won his letter in debate in his Freshman year, representing Whitman in their victory over Washington. Hoover is a Junior in College and a member of Phi Delta Theta. He has been active in College athletics and dramatics. Earl Stimson, also a letter man, debated against Washington last year. Stimson is a Sophomore and hales from Spokane, where he was prominent in debate circles. Clarence Ludwig is a Senior and although this is his final attempt at debate in College, he has had considerable practice in debate work.

 

Debate Tryouts Come

Wednesday Afternoon

 

Borleske Urges the Men to Put Out Strong Team.

 

EIGHT VACANCIES OPEN

 

The Question With Seattle Will Be Intercollegiate Athletics.

 

At chapel on Monday, Mr. Borleske presented the matter of debate to the student body. Whitman used to be noted for its strength and interest in debate work. It could boast of possessing one of the invincible debating teams of the Northwest. In this way, the debate work paid a tribute to the scholarship, ability, and loyalty of the students to the college. The work has lapsed within the last four or five years. We have just as keen brains here now as there ever were, and more of them. There should then be a return to the former vigor and enthusiasm and interest in debate work. The men's try out will be held November 15th, beginning at 4:15. We debate Washington about January 14th, on the question "Resolved, That inter-collegiate athletics should be abolished," and six weeks later, we debate Pullman on the settlement of industrial trial disputes by the Canadian plan. We need four teams, eight men. Every man in the institution, particularly those who are not engaged in athletics or Pioneer work, should take part in that tryout

 

QUESTION FOR MEN'S DEBATE IS CHOSEN

 

Try-Outs Will Be Held on the Afternoon of Friday, December 17,

 

The question for the men's triangular

 

I debate with the Washington State College and the University of Washington was chosen at a meeting of the debate council Tuesday and is the wording of the question on "National Preparedness" as submitted by W. S. C. The exact wording is as follows: Resolved. That a program of military and naval preparation, embodying the general principles proposed by President Wilson should be adopted. Now that the exact wording of the question has been decided upon those who expect to try out should get busy, as competition bids fair to be keen for places this year. The try-outs will be held on the afternoon of Friday, December 17. The exact system of try-outs has not been decided upon, but will be announced next week. Those planning to enter should notify J. Edwards at an early date so that final arrangements can be made for the try-out.

 

 

Hoover and Stimson Make Team of Formidable Opponents

 

DECISION WILL REST UPON SINGLE JUDGE

 

Edwards and ? Uphold the Negative on Pullman

Rostrum,

 

Who—Whitman vs. W. S. C.

When—Friday, March 9, 8:15 p. m.

Where—College Chapel.

Question—"Resolved, That the Canadian system for the settlement of industrial disputes should be adopted by the federal government."

Sides—Whitman, affirmative; W. S. C., negative.

Admission—Student ticket; 50 cents for others.

 

A lively debate is due Friday night in the College Chapel at 8:15 o'clock when the Whitman team meets the W. S. C. team on the question of the adoption of the Canadian system for the settlement of industrial disputes. Whitman upholds the affirmative. The team is composed of veterans who have in past years brought debate laurels to Whitman. Emory Hoover, who this year wins his third emblem in debate, will appear for the last time on the platform for the college. Earl Stimson, the concluding speaker, finishes his third year as a Whitman debater. An unusual interest was shown in the tryout, these men winning their places from a field of twenty contestants, six of whom had previously participated in intercollegiate debate. Despite pressing international problems, the question, as Coach Simpson says, remains as one of vital importance to every American. The report of a recent government commission declared that an industrial revolution in the United States was inevitable unless conditions were remedied. The Canadian system is proposed as a remedy. Its essential principle was recently advocated by President Wilson, and was also incorporated in the Newland's bill. Friday night's contest introduces a radical change into the judging system. The decision will rest entirely in the hands of a single judge. It is not yet known who will act in this capacity.

 

DEBATE COUNCIL MAKES PLANS FOR TRY-OUT!

 

Good Opportunity Offered to Make Teams and Win Prize of Class of '06.

 

The date for the men's tryouts is set for Wednesday, November 15, at 4:30 p. m. All college men are urged to turn out. The questions are live and should develop material for four snappy teams. From the questions submitted by the University of Washington at Seattle has chosen ' Resolved, That intercollegiate athletics should be abolished." This is a question, that has aroused much discussion throughout the northwest and possesses splendid possibilities for debate. Washington State college at Pullman has chosen, "Resolved, That congress should enact the necessary legislation for the compelling of the 'disputants, to accept, as a last resort, the Canadian ' system for the settlement of industrial disputes." This question is one which offers a rare opportunity to make a study of one of the questions of the day. In addition to the splendid training received in debating, to the fascination, of the game, and to the chance of winning, the class of '06 has offered a prize of $13 to be dispensed in some way not yet decided.

 

Whitman Wins Debate Here over University

 

Team Representing Missionaries at Seattle is defeated, Affirmative Side of Athletic Questions Wins in Both Places William Reynolds and Robert Porter field, representing Whitman, took the University of. Washington debate team to a two to one defeat last Friday night. Washington was ably represented by Arthur Simon and Kenneth Collins, and the Seattleites managed to give our orators a close run for their money.

 

The question was on the abolition of intercollegiate athletics. Reynold and Porterfield showed that these contests undermined health and scholarship, that they were becoming a business and that the evils of such athletics were inherent. The U. of W. team tried in vain to overcome these arguments but it was in vain and the decision came to Whitman. The judges were Supt, Yenny, of Pendleton; Rev. 0. H. Holmes, of Walla- Walla, and Mr. W. H. Fonts, of Dayton. The same evening in Seattle the Washington affirmative debate team won unanimously over the Whitman negative on the question; "Resolved, That Inter-collegiate Athletics Should be Abolished." Washington was represented by Alien Richlis and Robert Friedman; Whitman by Winthrop Chaplin and Charles Gaffny. The affirmative showed that commercialism had crept into college athletics, bringing with it the attendant evils of specialization in a few highly trained men; low scholastic standards, and professionalism. Illustrations of the latter evil were drawn from colleges here in the Northwest during the last year. The negative contended that athletics could be so reformed as to blot out all the evils, and still retain the virtues. After the debate the Whitman men, the judges and the Washington debate squad were guests of the Tau Kappa Alpha at the Delta Epsilon home, where refreshments were served, followed by toasts.

 

PROF SIMPSON WILL AGAIN COACH DEBATE

 

Associate in English Department Has Obtained Excellent Records.

 

TRYOUTS FOR W. S. C. DEBATE COME FEB. 5

 

With 16 Men Trying Out, Exceptional Results Are Expected.

 

Among the newer members of the faculty, the associate professor of English, Professor Milton Simpson, has become well known to the college both in his official capacity and in his position as debate coach, in both of which his energy and experience have brought worthy results. Professor Simpson is a native of Prince Edward Island, Canada. He matriculated at the Prince of Wales College at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, and after a year there he went to the Acadia University at Wolfville, Nova Scotia, where he received his A. B. degree and was honor graduate in English. To complete his scholastic education Professor Simpson came next to the United States, where he studied at Yale. Here he received the degrees of A. B. and A. M. and was a special honor graduate and was granted a fellowship. With this excellent record Professor Simpson was called to be head of the English department at Ouachita College at Arkadelphia, Arkansas. From Onachita College, he went to Lansing, Michigan, to be associate professor of English at the Michigan Agricultural College. It was from Michigan that Professor Simpson called to Whitman. Here he is in charge of the freshman work in English. Since coming here he has lived up to the excellent standard which he set for himself before. His life and enthusiasm and his thoroughness have kept interest active in the freshmen English classes. The generosity, as well as the superior ability of the man was shown when he gave his time and energy in coaching the two debate teams that opposed the University of Washington two weeks ago.

 

DEBATERS PICKED TO MEET WASHINGTON TEAM

Chaplin, Gaffney, Reynolds and Porterfield Win Debate Positions.

 

The men's tryout for debate was held Thursday afternoon. Professors Millspaugh, Bella, and Bratton acted as judges. Four men were chosen. There was much interest and material available this year, and Whitman will have reason to be proud of each individual man. Four men were chosen to debate against the University of Washington, two on the affirmative and .two on the negative of the question, "Resolved, That intercollegiate athletics should be abolished." Those chosen were, Robert I Porterfield, Charles Gaffney, Winthrop Chaplin, and William Reynolds.

 

 

 

WHITMAN AND W.S.C. DIVIDE DEBATE HONORS

AFFIRMATIVE Wins at Home College in Both Contests,

 

NEGATIVE LACKS IN BREADTH OF ATTACK

 

" Hoover and Stimson Provide Stronger Pair in Rebuttal, Honors in the dual debate between"' Whitman and W. S. C. on last Friday night were evenly divided. Whitman came out victorious at home but was defeated at Pullman. The question was "Resolved, That the Federal Governrment should adopt the Canadian system of settlement of industrial disputes."

 

Whitman was represented by Emory Hoover and Earl Stimson, W.C. by Donald Dupertus and Paul Brower. Dean George David Ayres of the University of Idaho acted as judge and George B. Marquis, a former Whitman debater, presided as chairman.

 

 

Hoover and Stimson Make Team of Formidable Opponents,

 

DECISION WILL REST UPON SINGLE JUDGE

 

Edwards and Lee Uphold the Negative on Pullman I Rostrum,

 

Who—Whitman vs. W. S. C.

When—Friday March 9, 8:15 p. m.

Where—College Chapel,

Question—"Resolved, That the Canadian system for the settlement of industrial disputes should be adopted by the federal government."

Sides—Whitman, affirmative; W. S. C., negative.

Admission—Student ticket 50 cents; $1 for others.

 

A lively debate is due Friday night in the College Chapel at 8:15 o'clock when the Whitman team meets the W. S. C. team on the question of the adoption of the Canadian system for the settlement of industrial disputes. Whitman upholds the affirmative. The team is composed of veterans who have in past years brought debate laurels to Whitman. Emory Hoover, who this year wins his third emblem in debate will appear for the last time on the platform for the college. Earl Stimson, the concluding speaker, finishes his third year as a Whitman debater. An unusual interest was shown in the tryout; these men winning their places from a field of twenty contestants, six of whom had previously participated in intercollegiate debate.

 

Despite pressing international problems, the question, as Coach Simpson says, remains as one of vital importance to every American. The report of the recent government commission declared that an industrial revolution in the United States was inevitable unless conditions were remedied. The Canadian system is proposed as a remedy. Its essential principle was recently advocated by President Wilson, and was also incorporated in the Jewland's bill.

 

Friday night's contest introduces a radical change into the judging system. The decision will rest entirely in the hands of a single judge. It is not yet known who will act in this capacity, the speakers for the State College are not yet announced. The other Whitman team, composed of Jonathan Edwards and Arthur T. Lee, left on Thursday for Pullman, where they will meet the Affirmative W. S. C. team. Edwards and Lee will also make their last appearance on a Whitman debate team, for this is their senior year. This is an occasion which demands the dance and wholehearted support of any student of Whitman College.

 

Whitman has broken even in debate so this year, having both won and lost the University of Washington dual. Every effort has been exerted by the men in preparing for this contest. An enormous amount of time has been spent in hard, persistent work, and intense study on the part of Coach Pon and the two teams which have prepared under his guidance.

 

DEBATE Try-outs come Wednesday afternoon

 

Borleske Urges the Men to Put Out Strong Team, EIGHT VACANCIES OPEN

 

The Question With Seattle Will Be Intercollegiate Athletics.

 

At chapel on Monday, Mr. Borleske presented the matter of debate to the student body. Whitman used to be noted for its strength and interest in debate work. It could boast of possessing one of the invincible debating teams of the Northwest. In this way, the debate work paid a tribute to the scholarship, ability, and loyalty of the students to the college. The work has lapsed within the last four or five years. We have just as keen brains here now as there ever were, and more of them.

There should then be a return to the former vigor and enthusiasm and interest in debate work.' The men's tryout will be held November 15th, beginning at

 

4:15. We debate Washington about January 14th, on the question, "Resolved,

That inter-collegiate athletics should be abolished," and six weeks later, we debate Pullman on the settlement of industrial disputes by the (Canadian plan. We need four teams, eight men. Every man in the institution, particularly those who are not engaged in athletics or Pioneer work, should take part in that tryout.

 

Whitman and WSC

DIVIDE DEBATE HONORS

 

Affirmative Wins at Home College in Both Contests

 

NEGATIVE LACKS IN BREADTH OF ATTACK

 

Hoover and Stimson Prove Stronger Pair in Rebuttal

 

Honors in the dual debate between Whitman and W. S. C. on last Friday night were evenly divided. Whitman came out victorious at home but was defeated at Pullman. The question was, 'Resolved, That the Federal Government should adopt the Canadian system for settlement of industrial disputes." In each debate the home team upheld the affirmative. Since the home team won in each case, it might appear that the Canadian method is a desirable one.

Whitman was represented here by Emory Hoover and Earl Stimson, W. S.C. by Donald Dupertus and Paul Browder. Dean George David Ayres of the University of Idaho acted as judge and George B. Marquis, a former Whitman debater, presided as chairman. The negative's plan was shown to be a part of the Canadian system and that the addition of compulsory arbitration was requisite for its success.

The Whitman team which debated at Pullman was composed of Arthur Lee and Jonathan Edwards. W. S. C. was represented by Thomas Parry and G. W. Trussell. Principal H. M. Hart of the Lewis and Clark High School of Spokane, acted as judge.

Professor Simpson, who has been head debate coach for the past year, is already considering plans for the coming year. Edwards, Hoover and Lee will be lost by graduation. Stimson, who has been in the employ of the Walla Walla branch of the United States Department of Agriculture for the past year, will be transferred to the head office at Washington, D. C. Of those who participated in the Washington debate, Reynolds is the only one to graduate. This leaves only three men who have had previous experience in college debating, Chaplin, Gaffney and Porterfield.

Two triangular debate leagues for the coming year are under consideration. The first would consist of Whitman, Oregon and Washington and the second of Whitman, W. S. C. and Idaho. Whether or not this arrangement will take place is not yet definitely settled.

 

Team Results

 

III.              Debate at Whitman College

A.      In November, director of physical education, Raymond Borleske encourages all men to try out for debate in order to bring back a winning tradition. Four were selected: William Reynolds, Robert Porterfield, Winthrop Chaplin, and Charles Gaffney. The men were allowed to split the class of 1906 gift to the school of $13.

B.     On January 12, Chaplin and Gaffney traveled to UW and Reynolds and Porterfield debated at Whitman. The topic, as chosen by UW, was the role of intercollegiate athletics. On a 3-0 decision Chaplin and Gaffney lost. On a 2-1 decision Porterfield and Reynolds won.

C.    In the spring tryouts were held for the upcoming Washington State College debate. Eighteen men tried out and four were selected: Arthur Lee, Earl Stimson, Emory Hoover and Jay Edwards (Robert Porterfield and Winthrop Chaplin were selected as alternates).

D.    For the W.S.C. debates Edwards and Lee traveled to Pullman and Hoover and Stimson debated at Whitman. The resolution was “Resolved: That the Canadian system for the arbitration of industrial disputes should be adopted by the United States.” Lee and Edwards lost their debate at W.S.C. and with a singular judge moderating the round; Hoover and Stimson won at home.

E.     Interestingly, the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) decided to use debate as a format to solve club problems they had. The resolution was “Resolved: that our association meetings justify the expenditure of time and effort involved.” There was no official judgment given as the women were expected “to find the answer in their own hearts.”