1915-1916 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

Description: Description: 1912 Boas Description: Description: 1912 bratton Description: Description: 1912 davis 

Professors Boas, W.R. Davis and Professor Bratton, faculty members on the debate council.

 

Whitman News

 

I. Whitman College in 1915-1916

            A. The college added 5 new professors to the faculty.

1. Mr. David Campbell, a former Whitman graduate was added to the music department as instructor of pianoforte.

2. Mess Meryl Kepler, a former Whitman graduate was also a welcome addition as instructor of pianoforte.

3. Mrs. Kroesch, wife of a faculty member was also added as an instructor in pianoforte.

4. Miss Alice Popper was added on as an instructor in the language group.

5. Mr. Ferdinand Fillion, a man of excellent abilities in the field of music was added to instruct violin and piano.

            B. Russel Miller was student body president

            C. S. B. L. Penrose was the college president

            D. Professor W.R. Davis and Professor Bratton were the faculty members on the debate council.

            E. President of the Debate Council was Rosella Hamilton

            F. Hazel Milligan was in charge of Women’s debate and Arthur Lee was in charge of Men’s.

II. At Whitman College

A. The completion of a half million dollar endowment gave Whitman a strong financial basis.

B. A novel theme writing contest for high schoolers was given national recognition at the National Council of English Teachers. Over 1,200 students participated in this event sponsored by the school.

C. Two new classes were added, History of Art and Household Economics.

D. President Penrose’s house burned down when an oil heater broke and malfunctioned.

E. Taxi cabs, jewelry, and drug stores were advertised in the Pioneer.

F. Clothing consisted of corsets and dresses for women and suits with hats for men.

 

Speech in the English Department News

p. 66-67

 

Department of English Professors DAVIS and BOAS Courses la, lb, and 5 of this department are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Courses la and 5 are required of Freshmen. Courses la, lb, 2, 5, 7a, and 7b are given every year. In the year 1916-1917, Courses 4, 8, II, 17, 19, and 20 will also be offered. Students who select English as their major study will take thirty-two hours chosen from the courses given in this department. It is recommended that these courses be distributed as follows: Composition, three hours (not including Courses la and lb); Old English and Middle English, seven hours; Periods of Modern Literature, nine hours; the Drama, six hours; the Novel, Contemporary Literature, American Literature, and the Teaching of English, seven hours. Written Composition. This course aims to stimulate independent and clear thinking and to develop skill in writing. Instruction is given to meet the needs of the class. Themes are required and reading suited to the class is prescribed. Weekly conferences on themes are required in addition to the two hours of recitation. Two hours, first semester. (M. F„ at 8:00) Required of Freshmen. Written Composition. This course is a continuation of la. Two hours, second semester. Required of Sophomores.

 

Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course I in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them to speech. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking. One hour, both semesters. (W., at 8:00) Required of Freshmen.

 

Composition. A course in writing for advanced students. In 1916-17 the course will be devoted to practice in journalistic writing. The needs of the class determine the nature of the course. Three hours, first semester. (M. W. F„ at 10:15) Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

Argumentation and Debate. A study of the theory and practice of persuasive argument. In the first semester the nature of evidence and the processes of analysis and brief drawing receive detailed attention. The chief emphasis is upon written argument. The second semester is given over to oral debate and to a brief consideration of the forms of public address. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. Two hours, both semesters. (T. Th., at 10:15) Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches. Two hours, second semester. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

 

5.   Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It is an organic part of Course 1. It sup­plements Course 1 in the study of the principles of compo­sition and gives practice in the application of them to speech. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking. One hour, both semesters. (W., at 8:00)

Required of Freshmen.

 

4.      Argumentation and Debate. A study of the theory and practice of persuasive argument. In the first semester the nature of evidence and the processes of analysis and brief drawing re­ceive detailed attention. The chief emphasis is upon written argument. The second semester is given over to oral debate and to a brief consideration of the forms of public address. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically.

Two hours, both semesters. (T. Th., at 10:15) Open to Juniors and Seniors.

 

6.      Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches.

Two hours, second semester.

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee clubs, debate, literary societies, and student publications are un­der its control. Any student or instructor of the institu­tion is eligible to membership.

 

AWARD HONORS OF 1914

The John Brining Prize in Extemporaneous Speaking

·        First, Earl Edgar Stimson, Class of 1918

·        Second, Robert Parazette Norton, Class of 1918

 

World News

I. In the World

A. President Woodrow Wilson established a Council of National Defense, composed of members of his cabinet, and a Civilian Advisory Commission, which set up local defense councils in every state and locality.

B. Pancho Villa, in retaliation to President Wilson’s support of the Carranza government took sixteen American mining engineers from a train in northern Mexico and shot them.

C. The United States established a military government in the Dominican Republic when the Dominicans refused to accept a treaty.

D. Further conflicts with Germany persisted, when they attacked an unarmed French steamer Sussex, injuring several Americans, yet the United States did not declare war.

 

 

Team News

October 15, 1915

Debate Council is Planning Contests

Whitman Will Submit “Seaman’s Act” as Question For Both Men and Women

Profs. W. R. Davis and W. A. Bratton Will Look Over Old and New Material

At the meeting of the debate council Tuesday Professors Davis and Bratton were elected as faculty member for the coming year. It was decided to submit the “Seaman’s Act” as a general question for both men’s and women’s intercollegiate debate this year. Plans for the coming season were discussed and an effort is to be made to hold women’s triangular this semester. The tryouts for places of the women’s teams will probably occur next month. According to contract the Whitman-Pullman co-ed and the Whitman University men’s debate will be held here. The debating material back from former seasons together with that in the Freshman class points toward hotly contested tryouts and a successful year.

Whitman has always stood well in debate and last year especially we were unusually fortunate. The men won unanimous decisions both at home in the Whitman-Pullman debate and at Seattle in the University of Washington-Whitman debate. The girls broke even by winning one and losing the other. With so many old debaters back and so many new people of good reputation along that line in high school we ought to have another epoch making year in Whitman’s debating history.

 

October 15, 1915

Discussion Club Plans Procedure for the Year

Members Are Going to Discuss Live Topics at Fortnightly Meetings

 

October 22, 1915

Discussion Club holds meeting

Verdant Wranglers Talk Pro and Con on Compulsory Military Drill

The program consisted of parliamentary drill and a discussion of the subject, “Is It Advisable, for Purposes of National Defense to Have Compulsory Military Training in High Schools and Colleges?”

 

October 29, 1915

Woman Suffrage is Discussed in Class

Political Science Students Hold Interesting Debate on Votes for Women

Last Wednesday the class in Municipal Government had a very unique session which took the form of a debate rather than a recitation. The question at issue was: “resolved that Woman Suffrage is desirable in the United States.” Both sides had able presentation. All the arguments pro and con were give to those of the class who did not participate in the debate and it was their duty to act as fain and impartial judges. Some of the speakers told of their own experience along domestic lines and stated that anti-suffrage brought the quiet hearth, into their happy homes while the suffrage movement brought speeches on the street corners, but alas, only a cold dinner when the husband returned after a hard day’s work. After all the speakers had given their sides of the question the class took a vote on the question. It might, perhaps, not be best to give out the exact return in a woman suffrage state like ours, but it was undoubtedly the irresistible eloquence of the speakers of the negative that made the speakers on the affirmative felt themselves bound to vote for their opponents.

 

November 5, 1915

Freshman Discussion Club Holds Meeting

The Discussion club held a program that proved to be very humorous, consisting of a parliamentary drill discussing both the pros and the cons of the question: “resolved, That a toothless man before a well filled table is in greater misery than a hob-tailed horse in fly-time.”

 

November 19, 1915

Freshman Discussion Club Holds Meeting

The club met at English Professor W.R. Davis’ house for their fortnightly meeting. The program consisted of a debate of the right of the United States to send arms and ammunition to warring nations.

 

November 19, 1915

Women May Debate on their Fashions

Interesting Question May Be the Subject for Formal Discussion for the Girls

Dame Fashion is to be scored. The Pullman Debate Council has decided upon the subject of “Fashions” as a fitting subject to be debated by the College women of this section.

The economic, physical and moral side of the question will be brought out and settled, so that after the debates everything concerning fashion will be so thoroughly set in one’s mind that there will be absolutely no doubt as to the right manner of custom to pursue.

The old methods of fashion are to be abhorred, the same as the present and a new system is to be installed, according to the debate council. The old style hoop skirt is gone forever. The poodle skirt is a mere shadow and will not be trifled with.

The main idea in the new movement as brought out by the debate council is to modernize fashion along the order of “fit”’ and not custom. The council also shows that a lady formerly taking three yards of goods to make a dress now takes thirty. They home to compromise in some manner and instigate a maximum yard law. It is hoped by the committee in charge to so influence the public by kind words and argument to do away with present styles and fashions and adopt a Grecian system which they have worked out. This system, according to the council, has been sanctioned by “Sister Billkess” of Spokane, as a modern idea equal to those of Herbet Spencer, Billy Sunday or Henry Ford.

 

November 26, 1915

Men’s Intercollegiate Debate Subject Chosen

“National Preparedness,” an Up-to-Date Question, Will be argued

Competitive try-outs expected to be keen

Only Four Letter Men Back Leaves Good Chances for freshman

 

The attention to all who intend to try out for places on the men’s debate teams this year is called to the fact that “National Preparedness” in the subject that had been chosen.

The exact wording of the question has not as yet been decided upon, but will be in a few days and will be posted on the bulleting board. In the meantime all who intend to enter this work had better get busy and read all the available material on the subject, as the first tryouts will be held as soon as possible after the wording id decided.

The question is on of national interest and is a live one. Material will be found in all the current magazines.

This is the desire of the debate council that the tryouts be held early this year so as to gibe the men who make the team a longer period to prepare in than has been allowed in the past. A large turn-out is expected and competition for place should be keen.

This debate offers the only chance for the men of the school to make a letter in this line, and the chances to do so this year are good, as there are but four letter men in school. The Freshmen class should produce some good material this year and the members of this class are especially urged to enter this work.

 

December 3, 1915

Question for Girls Debate is Chosen

La Follette Seaman Act Will Be the Subject for Co-ed’s Discussion

“The Lafollette Seaman Act: has been chosen by the intercollegiate league as the subject for women’s debate this year. There is a large amount of material on hand in the College library already so that, although the exact wording of the question has not as yet been determined, work for the try-outs will probably begin very shortly. The subject was selected according to the regular method from topics submitted by each of the members of the triangular league, the “Regulation of Fashions: having been turned in by W. S. C., “National Preparedness” by the University and the “LaFollette Seaman’s Act” by the Whitman council. The final debate for women’s debate has not been chosen but the league seems to favor the middle spring, the time of women’s debates last year.

 

December 3, 1915

Question for Men’s Debate is Chosen

The exact wording is as follows:

Resolved, That a program of military and naval preparation, embodying the general principles proposed by President Wilson, should be adopted.

 

December 10, 1915

Question for Girls’ Debate is Settled

Resolved, That the La Follette Seaman’s Act Be Repealed.

 

December 10, 1915

Freshman Discussion Club holds Meeting

The question discussed was the merit of intercollegiate athletics.

 

December 17, 1915

Try-Outs for Debate at Whitman Friday

Twelve Contestants, Including Three Letter Men, Desire to represent Local College

Whitman College debate try-outs, for the purpose of choosing the four men to represent the local school in the triangular debates with W. S. C. and the University of Washington, will be held Friday afternoon of this week, according to announcement of the debate council. With three debate letter men trying out for the teams this year indications point to Whitman’s being well represented in the annual contests. Emory Hoover, Clarence Ludwig, and Earl Stimpson are among the experienced men who are already studying the question.

The question to be argued is “Resolved, That a program of preparedness embodying the general features proposed by president Wilson should be adopted.”

 

January 7, 1916

Freshman Discussion Club Wishes Debate

Knights of the Green Lid Issue Challenge to Second Year Class

The Knights of the Green Cap have thrown their gauntlet at the feet of the Sophomore class. That is to say, that this year’s Freshman Discussion Club has challenged last year’s club to a debate. As yet no acceptance of the challenge has been made and no decision as to the question for the debate has been made. Some of the upperclassmen are very interested in the prattling of the infant class and although they do not think them capable of conducting a real forensic contest they would like to see them indulge in a Baby Show or a contest at drinking milk. One person suggested cream puffs at 40 yards, but it is generally the opinion that such a battle would result in too large a death toll and the Sophomore Class might be taken before the courts by the Humane Society on the charge of cruelty to dumb animals. Developments will be announced later.

 

January 14, 1916

Debate Teams are Chosen for Feb. 5

Emory Hoover, Clarence Ludwig, Earl Stimpson and Arthur Lee are selected to represent Whitman to discuss “Resolved, That a program of preparedness embodying the general features proposed by president Wilson should be adopted.”

 

January 21, 1916

Freshman Discussion Club Outlines New Work

The Freshman Discussion Club outlined the programs which will be held next semester. New interesting programs have been planned and new features will be added to them. The debate, to take place with last year’s discussion club will be held after examinations.

 

February 18, 1916

Triangular Debate Will be Thursday

Whitman Men Will Meet W. S. C. and U of W. on “National Preparedness”

Next Thursday night the forensic giants of the school will debate the question of “National Preparedness” with the representatives of Washington State College and the University of Washington.

The Question will be: “Resolved, That a program of preparedness embodying the general features proposed by president Wilson should be adopted.” Emory Hoover and Arthur Lee will uphold the affirmative of the question against the University of Washington team in the chapel, while the negative team composed of Clarence Ludwig and earl Stimpson will debate the negative at Pullman the same night.

The question is one of great interest to the people of the country at this time and the discussion of it will prove interesting to the intelligent students and townfolks.

Last year Whitman won both debates and unanimous decision against these two schools and the year before beat the University of Washington. Whitman is as ably represented this year as last and there is no reason why we can not repeat. This activity is the one in which Whitman has an equal chance and we have in the past more than upheld the honor of the College in this line.

 

 

Team Results

 

IV. Debate at Whitman

A. The Triangular debate topic for men was Resolved: “That a program of military and naval preparation, embodying the general principles proposed by President Wilson should be adopted.”

B. The Triangular debate topic for women was Resolved: “The La Follette Seaman’s Act be repealed”.

C. Triangular Debate

1. The affirmative Whitman team of Alma Smith and Rosella Hamilton defeated Washington State University at Pullman. The negative Whitman team of Margaret White and Elizabeth Starr were defeated by the University of Washington women’s team in a 2-1 decision.

2. The affirmative Whitman team of Hoover and Arthur Lee defeated University of Washington for the first time since the Triangular debates began. Earl Stimpson and Ludwigs were defeated by Washington State University at Pullman also for the first time ever.

3. Women’s Triangular debate at Whitman was 2nd to Washington State University in the league.

4. Men’s Triangular debate team stood 1st in the Triangular debate league.

D. There were 12 members on the team.