1913-1914 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

Description: Description: Description: 1912 Boas 

(Boas) No picture of Franklin available

 

Prof. Boas and Franklin were the coaches.

Will Berney was the debate manager.

 

Description: Description: Description: 13-14 Berney and Hoover

Description: Description: Description: 13-14 Debate Header

 

Description: Description: Description: 13-14 Edmonds and Edwards

Description: Description: Description: 13-14 Lilliequist and Munson

Description: Description: Description: 13-14 Lugenbuhl and Sickels

Description: Description: Description: 13-14 Oratory Header

 

 

Speech in the English Department News

p. 76-79

 

. Department of English PROFESSORS DAVIS AND BOAS, MISS MACNAUGHTON Courses I or 2 and Course 5 of this department are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Courses I and S are required of Freshmen. Courses 1, 2, 5, and 7 are given every year. In the year 1914- 1915 Courses 4, 8, II, 12, 14, 15, and 17 will also be offered. Students who select English as their major study are required to take 82 hours of work in English, distributed as follows: Composition, 8 hours (not including course I ); Old English and Middle English, 7 hours, courses 14 and 15; Periods of Modern Literature, 9 hours, elected from courses 18, 10, II, 12; Drama, 6 hours, course 8 or 9; Novel, Contemporary Literature, American Literature, and the Teaching of English. 7 hours, elected from courses 18, 16, 17, 19, 20.

1. Written Composition. This course aims to stimulate independent and clear thinking and to develop skill in writing. Instruction is given to meet the needs of the class; themes are required throughout the year; and reading, dealing with various phases of college life, is prescribed. Weekly conferences on themes are required in addition to the two hours of recitation. Linn, The Essentials of Composition; Briggs, College Lift; Lockwood, The Freshman and Bif College. Two hours of credit, both semesters. (M. F., at 8:00) Required of Freshmen.

B. Oral Composition. This course aims to develop the ability to speak effectively. It Is an organic part of Course 1. It supplements Course I in the study of the principles of composition and gives practice in the application of them to speech. Attention is also given to the formation of right vocal habits. Frequent practice is given in reading and extempore speaking. (The class meets weekly in small sections and monthly as a whole, W., at 8:00). One hour, both semesters. Required of Freshmen. English Composition. This course, in the year 1914-1915, will be devoted chiefly to narrative and descriptive writing. The elements of narration and description and the various forms of narrative composition are discussed in connection with a study of a number of masterpieces. Two short stories of usual magazine length and many shorter exercises are required. Three hours, second semester. (T. Th., at 10:15) Open to students who have completed Course 1.

Argumentation and Debate. A study of the theory and practice of persuasive argument. In the first semester the nature of evidence and the processes of analysis and brief drawing receive detailed attention. The chief emphasis is upon written argument. The second semester is given over to oral debate and to a brief consideration of the forms of public address. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. The course must be elected as a whole. Two hours, both semesters. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches. Two hours, one semester. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1914-15.]

A General View of English Literature. This course aims to provide an introduction to the meaning and value of literature by means of a careful study of the various literary forms in English; lyric poetry, the essay, the epic, the allegory, the ballad, the play, and the novel. Though the literary types are studied individually, great emphasis is laid upon the continuity of literary development in English. Three hours, both semesters. (M. W. F., at 11115) Open to Sophomores. Student in extempore speaking and reading before the class and the student's work is discussed with the instructor in conference. One hour, both semesters. (The class meets weekly in three sections and monthly as a whole. W., at 8:00) Required of Freshmen. English Composition. Frequent practice in composition and criticism. Daily themes or longer weekly compositions are required, and the student's work is criticized by the class as well as by the instructors. Regular conferences are held. In 1913-14, attention will be given to expository and informal argumentative writing. Three hours, first semester. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.

Argumentation and Debate. A study of the theory and practice of persuasive argument. In the first semester the nature of evidence and the processes of analysis and brief drawing receive detailed attention. The chief emphasis is upon written argument. The second semester is given over to oral debate and to a brief consideration of the forms of public address. The aim of the course as a whole is not so much to develop skill in formal debate as to give the student the power to consider disputed questions calmly and logically. The course must be elected as a whole. Three hours, both semesters. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1913-14.

Public Speaking. Practice in vocal interpretation of literature and in the composition and delivery of occasional speeches. Attention is given to tone production and to improvement in speech, Three hours, both semesters. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1913-14.]

A General View of English Literature. This course aims to provide an introduction to the meaning and value of literature by means of a careful study of the various literary forms in English; lyric poetry, the essay, the epic, the allegory, the ballad, the play, and the novel. Though the literary types are studied individually, great emphasis is laid upon the continuity of literary development in English. Three hours, both semesters. (M, W. F„ at 10:15) Open to Sophomores.

[18. English Literature from 1557 to 1660. Romances, essays, poetry. The works of Spenser, Bacon, and Milton receive special attention. Three hours, first semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1913-14.] [10. English Literature from 1660 to 1798. The Restoration drama, essays, poetry. The works of Dryden, Pope, Swift, Addison, Johnson, Goldsmith, Blake, and Burns receive special attention. Three hours, second semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1913-14.]

11. English Literature from 1798 to 1832. The poetry and prose of the Romantic period. Three hours, first semester. (M. W. F„ at 2:15) Open to Juniors and Seniors, and to Sophomores with permission of the instructor. 12. English Literature from 1832 to 1892. Poets, essayists, and critics. The works of Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Ruskin, and Arnold receive special attention. Three hours, both semesters. (M. W. F„ at 11:15) Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. [9. Elizabethan Drama. The drama in England from the miracle plays to the close of the theatres. This course centers in Shakespeare. Three hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1913-14.]

[8. Shakespeare. The reading and interpretation of representative plays. Three hours, both semesters. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Omitted in 1913-14.]

 

 

PRIZE:

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team.

 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee clubs, debate, literary societies, and student publications are under its control. Any student or instructor of the institution is eligible to membership.

 

 

Description: Description: Description: 1913-1914 Ariel Margaret McNaughton

 

Description: Description: Description: 1913-1914 Christopher Columbus Gose

 

Description: Description: Description: 1913-1914 Helen Louise Burr

 

 

World News

II. In the world

·        The U.S. and Mexico were almost at war because of Mexican raids into Texas. Students rallied for war.

·        The completion of the Panama Canal was deemed “the most important issue” for U.S. citizens.

·        Woodrow Wilson had just been elected President due to a Republican split between Taft and Roosevelt.

·        “Encouraged by the U.S. ambassador to Mexico, General Victoriano Huerta overthrows Madero, proclaims himself Provisional President of Mexico and has Madero murdered”

·        “Garment workers strike in New York and Boston; win pay raise and shorter hours.”

·        “Henry Ford develops first moving assembly line.”

·        “16th Amendment (income tax) and 17th (popular election of U.S. senators) adopted.”

·        “Bill creating U.S. Federal Reserve System becomes law.”

·        “Woodrow Wilson becomes 28th U.S. president.”

·        “Rioting broke out in Natal after the arrest of Mohandas Gandhi for protesting the recently enacted immigration laws, which restricted the freedom of movement of Asians.”

·        “Preceding the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson, there was a near riot as 5,000 women marched, demanding the vote for women.”

·        “The first home electric refrigerator was put on the market. It was called "The Domelre" and it was put on the market in Chicago for $900.”

 

 

Team News

WEARERS OF THE "W."

Bainton, 14; Barrett, 14; Berney, 15; DuBois, 15; Edmonds, 15; Hill, 16; Miller, 16; Edwards, 17; Hoover, 17; Lillian Pierce, 14; Alice Lllliequist, 15; Martha Luginbuhl, 16; Florence Lilliequist, 17; Grace Munson, 17; Eleanor Sickels, 17.

 

HISTORY OF MEN'S TRIANGULAR DEBATE LEAGUE.

 

 

1st year

2nd year

3rd year

Total

U. of Washington

7

4

4

15

Washington State College

 

3

5

4

12

Whitman College

2

3

4

9

 

The Triangular Debate League, composed of the three colleges In Washington, was inaugurated In the school year of 1911-12. According to the contract drawn up, each school annually puts out two teams. These two teams have opposite sides of the question, the affirmative debating at home and the negative going to one of the other institutions. According to this arrangement, a debate is held on the same night at Seattle, Pullman, and Walla Walla, all on the same question, which is decided upon at the opening of each school year. Championships are decided on the basis of the school winning the most units. Bach victory counts as one unit, as does also each judge's vote.

The question debated the first year was, "Resolved, That it would be desirable to extend the principle of the recall to include all municipal, county, and state judges of the State of Washington."

Whitman lost to the University at Walla Walla by a two to one decision. Pullman won from Whitman two to one, and Washington won from Pullman three to nothing. "Resolved, That the revenue for local purposes In the State of Washington should be raised by a tax assessed against land values only," was the question for the year 1912-13. This year all affirmative teams won, Whitman winning from Pullman two to one, Pullman winning from Washington three to nothing, and Washington winning from Whitman by the same score. This year the question "Resolved that a Federal Commission should be created with power to prescribe minimum wages in sweated industries, constitutionally granted" was debated by the league. Again all affirmative teams won, and all by similar scores. Whitman won from the University two to one, Washington won from Pullman by the same score, and Pullman won from Whitman.

 

WOMEN'S TRIANGULAR DEBATE LEAGUE

The Women's Debate League, organized this year under a contract practically similar to the one under which the Men's League exists, includes the same Institutions—Washington, W. S. C. and Whitman. The standing for this year's debates gives W. S. C. first with seven points. Whitman second with five, and Washington third with no points to her credit. Whitman at home lost to W. S. C. two to one, W. S. C. won from Seattle three to nothing, and Washington lost to Whitman by a unanimous decision.

 

TRIANGULAR DEBATE

February 27, 1914

"Resolved: That a Federal Commission should be created with power to prescribe minimum wages in sweated industries, constitutionality waived."

WHITMAN-WASHINGTON DEBATE

MEMORIAL HALL

Affirmative—Whitman: Will Berney 15, Emory

Hoover 17.

Negative—U. of W.: Wallace MePherson, Claud

Jacobs.

The judges—Mr. B. F. Barker, of Walla Walla;

Hon. N. D. Peterson, of Milton; Dr. Clingan, of

Walla Walla.

Decision—Two to one for the affirmative.

 

WHITMAN-W. S. C. DEBATE

February 27, 1914

PULLMAN, WASH.

Affirmative—W. S. C.: L. B. Vincent, Mark

Brislawn.

Negative—Whitman: Harold Edmonds '15, Jonathan Edwards 17.

The judges—MT. Sautelle, of Spokane, Mr. Cowan of Spokane.

The decision—Two to one for the affirmative.

 

WOMEN'S TRIANGULAR DEBATE

April 17, 1914

"Resolved: That the United States should agree by treaty with each of the ten first rate powers mutually to submit all questions impossible of settlement by direct negotiation to the permanent Hague Tribunal." (First rate powers include, The United States, Great Britain, Germany, France, Japan, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Austria-Hungary, Italy and Russia.

WHITMAN-W. S. C.

Memorial Hall

Affirmative—Whitman: Martha Lugenbuhl 16,

Eleanor Sickels 17.

 

Negative—W. S. C.: Esther Bull, Eva Maxwell.

The decision, two to one for negative.

The judges—Judge Sessions, Davenport; Prof.

Hugh C. Blair, Spokane; J, L. Dumas, Dayton.

WHITMAN-WASHINGTON

Seattle, Wash.

Affirmative—U. of W.: Lettie Rochester, Emily

Squires.

Negative—Whitman: Florence Lilliequist 17,

Grace Munson 17.

Decision—unanimous tor the negative.

The judges—Rev. Sidney Strong, Seattle; James

Baldwin, Seattle; Everett Smith, Seattle.

 

FRESHMEN SPEAKING CONTEST

In former years little opportunity was given the Freshmen to test their ability in public speech, outside the regular college debates and oratorical contests. Last Commencement, however, a contest distinctly the Freshmen's own was instituted by the English department and called The Freshmen Extemporaneous Speaking Contest. Prizes of twenty dollars and ten dollars were offered to the two highest contestants and fifteen ambitious Frosh responded to the call of the forum—or the pocketbook. Owing to the large number of contestants, a preliminary contest was necessary to select five candidates who should compete for final honors in Commencement week. The selected five were given their choice of sixteen various subjects and were allowed three hours for preparation with the privilege of consulting any source of information. The modes of preparation were as various as a combination of five people could devise. The contestants besought every source for that subtle, elusive thing, called "inspiration." Frowning under the shade of a campus maple, puzzling thru a brown study of a favorite writer, systematizing notebook data, rushing for a hurried conference with the "person who knew," and even worrying over the teacups of an untimely breakfast party, these Freshmen ferreted out the germs of the mighty ideas they were given but eight minutes to present.

The final contestants and their subjects were:

"The Habit of Cheerfulness" .... Pearl Nelson

"The Improvement of The Race" . . . Martha Luginbuhl

"Vocational Training in Public Schools" . . Fred Morrison

"The Control of Trusts" ..... Russell Miller

"How to Spend Leisure" ..... Clarence Ludwig

Fred Morrison was adjudged to have made the best presentation of his subject and was given first prize. Russell Miller was awarded second prize. All the speeches were well delivered and enthusiastically received by the audience. The experiment was deemed highly successful and a similar contest will occupy a place of dignity and Interest in future Commencements.

The purpose of the Extemporaneous Speaking Contest is to encourage and develop readiness and forcefulness of saying what is already in the knowledge of the person called upon for a sudden expression of opinion. It is in line with the tendency away from formal and artificial elocution, and emphasizing the practical necessity of holding one's own in argument among peers.

 

 

 

Team Results

 

IV. Debate at Whitman

 A. The issue at hand was whether or not debaters should exchange briefs before tournaments.

 B. The Triangular Debate League was in place for men and women, consisting of Whitman, Washington University, and Washington State College.

 C. The topic for intercollegiate men’s debate was “Resolved: That a federal commission should be created with power to prescribe minimum wages in all sweated industries. Constitutionality waived.”

 D. For women the topic was “Resolved: That the United States should by treaty agree with all first rate powers mutually to submit all disputes impossible by settlement by direct negotiation to permanent Hague Tribunal.” First rate powers in 1914 were: the U.S., Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Japan, and Russia.

 E. The men’s team was selected by open school audition debates and consisted of R.W. Emerson, J.W. Riley, G. Hoover, W. Berney, J. Edwards, and H. Edmonds.

 F. The women’s team, which was only in its fourth year, consisted of two teams, two of which traveled. Eleanor Sickles and Martha Luginbuhl defeated Lettie Lee Rochester and Emily Squires of WU on the affirmative. Florence Lillieqqust and Grace Munson were defeated by a team from WSC on the negative.