1911-1912 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

Description: Description: Description: 1913-1914 haines 2 Description: Description: Description: 09-10 Debate Council

PROF. CHARLES G. HAINES

MR. GEORGE B. MARQUIS

 

 

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Whitman News

 

 

Speech in the English Department News

 

1911-1912

 

5.      Oral Composition. This course combines with Course 1 in the study and application of the principles of com­position. As much practice as possible is given each student in speaking and reading before the class; there are systematic exercises in voice training, and the stu­dent’s work is discussed with the teacher in conference.

One hour, both semesters.

Open to all students.

Required of all Freshmen.

 

4.      Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, first semester.

Open to students who have completed Course 5.

 

6.      Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and prac­tice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, second semester.

Open to students who have completed Course 5.

 

PRIZE:

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team. This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS:

THE ATHENAEUM AND PHRENOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important art of debate and public speaking.

 

 

1910

 

5.    Oral Composition. This course combines with Course 1 in the study and application of the principles of composi­tion. As much practice as possible is given each student in speaking and reading before the class; there are sys­tematic exercises in voice training, and the student’s work is discussed with the teacher in conference.

One hour, both semesters. (T., at 8:00)

Open to all students.

Required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees.

 

6.    Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, first semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Course x.

 

4.    Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates,, individual criticisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, second semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

1911

 

5.    Oral Composition. This course combines with Course 1 in the study and application of the principles of composition. As much practice as possible is given each student in speak­ing and reading before the class; there are systematic exercises in voice training, and the student’s work is dis­cussed with the teacher in conference.

One hour, both semesters.

Open to all students.

Required of all Freshmen.

6.    Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, first semester.

Open to students who have completed Course 5.

4.     Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, second semester.

Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

The Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Literary Societies, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important work of debate and public speaking.

 

The Declamation Cups—

Henry Rehorn, Class of 1913, and Loren Froebel Dumas, Class of 1914.

 

 

The Conservatory of Music (1910) is a handsome fire- proof building of concrete, brick and terra cotta. It is devoted entirely to the use of the Conservatory of Music. The basement contains class-rooms, a room for ensemble work, and a room for piano tuning, equipped with an elevator. The main floor is occupied by the teachers' studios, a large lobby, the administrative offices, and the reception room. A small concert hall, seating about two hundred and fifty persons, is used for recitals and concerts. The second and third floors are devoted to practice rooms for music students. The building is heated by steam with a vacuum system, and lighted by electricity. The Pearsons Academy Building (1883) is a large two- story building, with ample recitation rooms, laboratories, offices, reading room, and assembly hall. After the year 1911-12, the preparatory department having been discontinued, the building will be used as recitation rooms for college classes.

 

p. 77-78

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

Professors COLEMAN, BOAS, *Miss FRAZER, Miss MCNAUGHTON Courses 1 and 5 are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Course l must be taken by Freshmen. Students who select English as their major study will take also Courses 8, or g and 13:10,11, or 12; 14 or 15' Only nine hours of work will be offered in any one semester from Courses 8, c), io, ll, 12, 13, 14) and 15.

1. Written Composition. Lectures, conferences, and writ- ten exercises. Three short themes are written each week; or at the will of the instructor, two or more of these may be replaced by one longer composition. The themes are criticized in detail by the instructor. Illustrative reading in the main forms of literary composition is required. Two hours of credit are given for the three hours of recitation. Two hours of credit, both semesters. (M. W. F., at 8:00) Open to all students. Required of all Freshmen.

2. Advanced Composition. A further course in practical com- position for students who desire special training. Short daily themes or longer weekly compositions are written throughout the year. The student is encouraged to develop his aptitudes with a view to possible literary work in after life. Each student's work is subject to the criticism of the class as well as to that of the instructor. Regular conferences are held. Two hours, both semesters. Open to students who have completed Course I, and who have received permission from the instructor.

5. Oral Composition. This course combines with Course I in the study and application of the principles of com- position. As much practice as possible is given each student in speaking and reading before the class; there are systematic exercises in voice training, and the student's work is discussed with the teacher in conference. One hour, both semesters. Open to all students. Required of all Freshmen.

4. Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews. Foster, Argumentation and Debating. Two hours, first semester. Open to students who have completed Course 5.

6. Public Speaking. A study of the chief form of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches. Two hours, second semester. Open to students who have completed Course 5.

7. A General View of English Literature, (a) A history of literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present, (b) A study of literary types. Representative poetic and prose writings are studied for the purpose of making clear the nature of the various literary forms: epic, allegory, ballad, lyric, sonnet, play, essay, novel. Three hours, both semesters, (The whole class meets M„ at 9:00; for the remaining two hours, two sections, T. Th., at 8:00, and-W. F., at 10:15) Open to students who have completed Course 1. 8. Shakespeare. Six plays are studied. Three hours, both semesters. (M. W. F., at 3:15) Open to students who have completed Courses I and 7. [9. Elizabethan Drama—1559-1642. After a survey of the beginning of the drama in England, a careful study is made of the plays of Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher. The course aims to trace the history and discover the principles of dramatic construction. Three hours, first semester. (M. W. F., at 3:15) Open to students who have completed Courses I and 7. Omitted in 1912-13.]

 

p. 108-109

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debat- ing team. This team is chosen in the annual contest be- tween the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

THE DECLAMATION CUPS—A friend of the College has presented two handsome silver cups upon which are to be engraved the names of the winners in the annual declamation contest of the College.

 

p. 111

THE POLITICS CLUB is an organization under the general direction of the department of Political Science. Its object is to interest its members and others in current economic and political questions. THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee clubs, debate, literary societies, and student publications are un- der its control. Any student or instructor of the institution is eligible to membership. THE ATHENAEUM AND PHRENOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important work of de- bate and public speaking. THE LIBETHREAN, PHILOLITHIAN, AND AGORA LITERARY SOCIETIES have been organized by the young women of the college for the development of literary culture and social life. THE WHITMAN CHORAL SOCIETY, while not intended exclusively for college students, offers to them without charge the advantage of singing in a large and well-trained chorus and of hearing the great oratorios and choral compositions. THE CHAPEL CHOIR is composed of twenty-four carefully selected mixed voices, trained by the Musical Director of the Conservatory of Music. It leads the singing at the daily chapel service and once each week offers a special musical program. It also furnishes music for certain special occasions, as Convocation and Commencement. GLEE CLUBS are maintained by both young men and young women.

 

 

 

World News

·        “Mexican Revolution: Porfirio Diaz, president since 1877, replaced by Francisco Madero.”

·        “In Britain the House of Lords makes it possible for the House of Commons to pass legislation without the approval of the House of Lords, revolutionizing British politics.”

·        “The first ship powered by diesel is launched.”

·        “First use of aircraft as offensive weapon in Turkish-Italian War.”

·        Chinese Republic proclaimed after revolution overthrows Manchu dynasty.”

·        “Amundsen reaches South Pole.”

·        “Ernest Rutherford discovers the structure of the atom.”

·        “An accidental explosion in the city of Wuchang reveals a cache of weapons and a list of military officers who belonged to a secret revolutionary group.”

·        The Standard Oil Company was ordered to “divest itself of its 37 interlocking firms” for being a monopoly.

·        The first coast-to-coast US Flight was accomplished by Calbraith Rodgers.

 

 

 

Team News

 

In the annual Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest held at Pullman, May 27, 1911, between W. S. C., Whitman, and O. A. C., Fred W. Clemens, by unanimous decision, won first place for Whitman.

 

ALUMNUS' OPINION SURVIVES TEST OF SHORT EXPERIENCE

 

Whitman's Representative in Oratorical Contest of Last May Still Believes What He Said About Newspapers—Way of Clean Journalism Is Hard—Responsibility Rests With People.

"Few legitimate institutions feel the pressure of the heel of the almighty dollar as does the newspaper. None stands in a more strategic position for finally demonstrating to the world that gold must be the servant and not the master." Such were the words of Fred W. Clemens, who last year represented Whitman in the intercollegiate oratorical contest with the composition "The Fourth Estate". In further conversation with a representative of Waiilaptu 13 he said: "I believe that I recognized, when writing that oration, the peculiar and great difficulties standing in the way of a truly clean and fear- less paper. I believe that I saw with reasonable clearness the unusual power for weal or woe vested, by its very nature, in the press.

"Like the proverbial tub, the influential newspaper must stand on its own bottom. Philanthropic endowment might not prove amiss, in fact, has not in certain instances, but the paper that overcomes its difficulties in open warfare, wresting financial success from business patronage, is the one above all others that can depend upon the confidence and respect of a community, and, therefore, be in line for the exercise of uplifting influence. Now, no business institution can live without patronage from some source. All must depend ultimately upon the people, but the newspaper more directly, perhaps, than any other. And the character of that paper is going to be determined by the ideals of the people who patronize it. That is why I would reiterate the plea that I made last May for the men and women who have caught visions of what it can do for the betterment of a community and a nation to render to it business support."

 

DEBATE COUNCIL

PROF. CHARLES G. HAINES

MR. GEORGE B. MARQUIS

President PAUL W. GARRETT, ‘13

CHESTER C. MAXEY, ‘12

DONALD G. CAMPBELL, ‘12

The Debate Council, composed of three undergraduates who are wearers of the debate and PROF. CHARLES G. HAINES, MR. GEORGE B. MARQUIS oratory emblem and two non-student, members, has control of all the intercollegiate debate and oratory relations of the Associated Students. The three undergraduates are elected at large from those who have represented Whitman in an intercollegiate debate or oratorical contest. These three then elect two members from outside the student body, one of whom is usually a member of the college faculty. The business affairs of the Debate Council are now conducted through the Managerial Board, instead of through a Manager of Debate as in former years.

 

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