1910-1911 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

Description: Description: 1910-11 Norman Frank Coleman  Description: Description: 09-10 Debate Council  Description: Description: 1910-11 Mabel Buland   

 

Prof. N.F. Coleman and George B. Marquis were the faculty members of the Debate Council

Miss Burland (English) was the women’s coach.

 

Description: Description: 10-11 Cartoon

 

 

Whitman News

I. Whitman College in 1910-1911

            A.  The College added five new professors to the faculty

                        1. Wayne Darlington, Dean of the Engineering School

                        2. Aubrew W. Goodenough, English

                        3. Mabel Buland, English

                        4. Charles Grove Haines, Political Science

                        5. Lawrence Ilsley Hewes, Mathematics

            B. Alfred Lange was the student body president.

            C. Stephen B.L. Penrose was the College President

D. Prof. N.F. Coleman and Geo. B. Marquis were the faculty members of the Debate Council

E. Miss Burland (English) was the women’s coach.

III. At Whitman College

            A. A large squad of men tried out for football.

            B. Popular activities included chapel, recitals, and glee club

            C. Whitman College formed its first band to play at football games.

            D. Suits were popular attire for men; women wore long skirts and shirts with stiff collars.

 

Description: Description: 10-11 The Team - Maxey, Campbell, Johnson

Maxey, Campbell, Johnson

 

Speech in the English Department News

1910

 

5.    Oral Composition. This course combines with Course 1 in the study and application of the principles of composi­tion. As much practice as possible is given each student in speaking and reading before the class; there are sys­tematic exercises in voice training, and the student’s work is discussed with the teacher in conference.

One hour, both semesters. (T., at 8:00)

Open to all students.

Required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees.

 

6.    Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, first semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Course ~.

 

4.    Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates,, individual criticisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, second semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

1911

 

 

5.    Oral Composition. This course combines with Course 1 in the study and application of the principles of composition. As much practice as possible is given each student in speak­ing and reading before the class; there are systematic exercises in voice training, and the student’s work is dis­cussed with the teacher in conference.

One hour, both semesters.

Open to all students.

Required of all Freshmen.

6.    Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, first semester.

Open to students who have completed Course 5.

4.     Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, second semester.

Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team. This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

The Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Literary Societies, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important work of debate and public speaking.

 

The Declamation Cups—

Henry Rehorn, Class of 1913, and Loren Froebel Dumas, Class of 1914.

 

Description: Description: 1910-11 Athenaeum

Athenaeum Society

 

 

 

Description: Description: 1910-11 Henry Rehorn

 

World News

A. “After the assassination of a prominent Republican leader, a revolt broke out against the monarchy. The revolt was led by the Army and Navy. King Manuel II was forced to flee Portugal for England. A Republic was declared and Teofilo Braga, a noted author, was named Interim President.” *

B. “On August 22nd, Japan officially annexed Korea.”           *

C. “On May 31st, the Union of South Africa was established.” *

D. “The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was founded in New York, in November.” *

E.  Boy Scouts of America is incorporated.” *

F.  In Mexico a popular uprising begins against the dictator Porfirio Diaz.” *

G. “King George V, second son of Edward VII, begins a 25-year reign as monarch of Britain.” *

H.  The first use of aircraft as an offensive weapon occurred in the Turkish-Italian War.” *

 

Description: Description: 1910-04

 

 

 

Team News

 

From Waiilatpu 1912, p. 134

 

The Debate Council

 

Intercollegiate oratory and debate at Whitman are under the jurisdiction of the Debate Council.  At the annual election in May, three undergraduates, wearers of the "W" are elected for the ensuing year.  These choose two graduate or faculty members and the five men thus chosen appoint a sixth, an undergraduate, as secretary of the Council.  This secretary is also manager of debate and oratory.

 

The Debate Council, which is usually connected with the English Department of the College, has full charge of debate contracts entered, of choice of questions or sides, and of all inter-society or local tryouts in debate and oratory.

 

 

President:

OTTO B. JOHNSON, '11

Secretary and Manager:

DONALD G. CARIPBELL, '12

Student Members:

CALVIN CRUMBAKER, '11

PAUL GARRETT, '13

Faculty Members:

PROF. N. F. COLEMAN

GEO. B. MARQUIS

 

Wearers of the "W"

(Awarded to all students who have represented Whitman

in an Intercollegiate Debate or Oratorical Contest.)

Debate:

CAMPBELL, '12

CRUMBAKER, '11

GARRETT, '13

GREENWELL, '12

JOHNSON, 0., '11

MAXEY, '12

YATES, '12

Oratory:

CLEMENS, '11

COOKE, '12

 

From Wailatpu 1912.

 

DEBATE-ORATORY

Whitman has just reason to be proud of her record in debating.  Beginning her activity in this line in 1898, she has since then held debates with the University of Oregon, Pacific, Willamette, Idaho, and Washington State College.   Out of the 29 debates held with these schools, Whitman has won 19. During the College year 1909-1910, only one debate was held, that with W. S. C. Relations, however, were again begun with the University of -Idaho for a series of dual debates, to commence in 1911.   At the annual inter-society contest, held in May, 1910, the prize of 13 dollars worth of books, awarded by the class of '06 to the best debater, was won by Calvin Crumbaker. The team to meet W. S. C. in 1911 was also chosen at this contest, and consisted of Calvin  Crumbaker, Otto Johnson, and Chester Maxey, with Donald Campbell as alternate.  Proposals made to Whitman by W. S. C. to' hold a "co-ed" debate were enthusiastically received by the women of the college and: agreements were entered into for a series of such debates, the first to be held in Pullman in April. At a spirited try-out, held on March 6th, out of seven entries, the following were chosen to represent the college:   Helen Walters, Alice Lilliequist, Alice McMillan. Proposals made by W. S. C. and U. of W. to form a triangular debating league were also agreed to by Whitman.  On account of the lateness of the season, no contest could be arranged for this year, but are agreement is being drawn up for such a league, to commence next fall. So, with four debates to take place this year, and with men and women both taking part, debating at Whitman is certainly not a neglected branch of student activities.

 

Whitman College Pioneer, January 17, 1911, p. 3.

 

PHRENOKOSMIAN

 

The regular meeting of the Phrenokosmian Society was held in Association Hall last Thursday evening. Fifteen minutes were devoted to parliamentary drill with various members in the chair.   Following this an extemporaneous, informal debate was held upon the question,   "Resolved, That Whitman College activities are injurious to the well-being of the students."  The decision was given to the negative.

 

 

From Waiilatpu 1912, p. 136.

 

Whitman vs. W. S. C.

Friday, January 13, 1911

Whitman Chapel

"Resolved, That the best interests of American colleges justify the abolition of Intercollegiate athletics."

Affirmative, W. S. C.--Mr. S. A. Kimbrough, Mr. G. V. Stambaugh,

Miss Mary Bird.

Rebuttal--Mr. S. A. Kimbrough.

Negative, Whitman--Chester Maxey, Donald Campbell, Otto Johnson.

Rebuttal--Otto Johnson.

Judges--Mr. E. T. Coman, Spokane; Mr. G. W. Jewett, Pomeroy;

Rev. J. D. Armistead, Walla Walla.

Decision--2-1 in favor of the Negative.

 

Description: Description: 10-11 The Coed Team

 

Team Results

 

Class of 1911 Reunion Notes

 

IV. Debate at Whitman College

A.  The debate council was Professor Coleman, George Marquis, Calvin Crumbaker (’11), Otto Johnson (’11), and Vernon W. Cooke, (’11).  The debate council was elected annually in May.  Three undergraduates were chosen to preside over tryouts, contracts, and rules for intercollegiate oratory and debate.  They were responsible for selecting two graduate or faculty members.  This group chose a sixth undergraduate to serve as secretary.  The secretary was Donald G. Campbell (’12). 

B. All students who represented Whitman in debate or oratory were awarded the honored “W.”  In debate, these students included Campbell, (’12), Crumbaker (’11), Garret (’13), Greenwell (’12), Johnson (’11), Maxey (’12), and Yates (’12). In oratory, Clemens (’11) and Cooke (’12) won awards.

C. Whitman began co-ed debate.  They signed a two year contract.  The first competition was with W.S.C. (Washington State College) in Pullman.  The topic was, “Resolved, that women and men should receive the same wages for the same work performed.”  Prior to 1911, only one woman had represented the college in debate.  Many women tried out for the team, but only three were chosen: Alice Lilliequist, Helen Walters, and Alice McMillan.

D. Whitman debated W.S.C. (Washington State College) on the topic, “Resolved, that the best interests of American colleges justify the abolition of Intercollegiate athletics.”  The Whitman team was Chester Maxey, Donald Campbell, and Otto Johnson.  The decision was a 2-1 in favor of the negative.  Whitman debaters were more prepared than their opponents.  The Pioneer reported that Whitman “has secured all the data and statistics regarding the conditions of athletic relations between colleges, first hand from the largest educational institutions in the country, including the conditions at Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Dartmouth, Stanford, and practically all the larger institutions.  All these colleges are in favor of keeping relations between colleges and athletics.”

E. Whitman held eight debates with the University of Idaho.  Four were won by Whitman and four were won by Idaho.  Whitman held two debates with the University of Oregon.  Both were won by Whitman.  Whitman won eight out of eleven debates with W.S.C. and four out of five debates with Pacific.  Topics included the status of the US protectorate, Cuba and rules for senate voting.  Another resolution was, “Resolved, that although it is a better remedial measure than compulsory insurance, it is undesirable to compel employers in railroads to pay compensation to their employees for accidents.”  Between 1898 and 1911, Whitman won 19 out of 29 debates with the University of Oregon, Pacific, Willamette, Idaho, and Washington State College.

F. The Phrenokosmian Society held a debate in Association Hall over the following topic, “Resolved, that the federal conservation of forests is conducive to the best interests of the Pacific Northwest.  The debate was won by the negative Harry Bowers and Cecil Yales (although Cecil was absent and Bowers read his speech in his place).  The affirmative was Buy George and Vernun Kuney.

 

Description: Description: 1910-11 Green Cottage

We believe debate meetings may have occurred in this building.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Taken from: http://www.multied.com/dates/1910.html, http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005246.html, http://www.fsmitha.com/time20.htm, http://www.mountaintimes.com/history/1911s/world.php3, http://www.towson.edu/heartfield/events/1910.html