1909-1910 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

 

A committee has been formed at this point handling the decisions for who gets to compete on the intercollegiate level. Norman Coleman, George Maquis, and President Penrose serve on this council.

 

Informal debates at Whitman are supposed to be regulated by the College Librarian and the Dean of Women.

 

Formal-debating is in charge of a committee, composed of three undergraduate wearers of the honor "W," two members, not undergraduates, chosen by the student members, and a Secretary chosen by the entire committee, who acts as manager of Debate and Oratory.

 

This body is known as the Debate Council.

 

Description: Description: 09-10 Debate Council

 

Description: Description: 09-10 Phrenokosmian

Description: Description: 09-10 The Team That Defeated W

Description: Description: 1909-02

 

Whitman News

 

 

 

Speech in the English Department News

 

 

1909

 

5.   Public Speaking. A general course in vocal training, the use of the voice in speaking and reading, the elements of interpretative reading, with practice in the preparation and delivery of declamations and abort speeches.

One hour, both semesters. (T., at 8:00)

Open to all students.

Required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees.

 

6.   Advanced Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speech, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, first semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Course 5.

 

4.   Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criti­cisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, second semester. (T. Th., at 3 :15)

Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team. This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

EXPRESSION AND ORATORY

Miss Thomson

Opportunity is offered for the study of Elocution, Oratory, and Dramatic Art.

 

 

1910

 

5.    Oral Composition. This course combines with Course 1 in the study and application of the principles of composi­tion. As much practice as possible is given each student in speaking and reading before the class; there are sys­tematic exercises in voice training, and the student’s work is discussed with the teacher in conference.

One hour, both semesters. (T., at 8:00)

Open to all students.

Required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees.

 

6.    Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speaking, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches.

Two hours, first semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Course ~.

 

4.    Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews.

Foster, Argumentation and Debating.

Two hours, second semester. (T. Th., at 3:15)

Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE CLASS OF 1906 PRIZE FOR DEBATING, consisting of books to the value of thirteen dollars, is to be awarded annually to the leader of the first intercollegiate debating team This team is chosen in the annual contest between the Athenaeum and Phrenokosmian Societies.

 

The Evolution of Hunter Conservatory

(home of the debate program from 1998 to 2011 and later)

 

 

Description: Description: !09-10 Conservatory Evolution,3

 

Evolution of the Conservatory

In the great interest connected with the beginning of Whitman College, we are likely, perhaps, to forget the beginning of the Conservatory of Music, so closely connected with it. If so, the new Conservatory building may well serve to turn our thoughts backward to trace its growth.

 

Musical instruction was first offered at Whitman in the catalogue for the year 1883-84, but it was not until two years later that the Conservatory was started. That year it was announced "that an earnest endeavor would be made by the President while in the East to secure a good teacher of vocal music." That teacher was Professor H. J. Cozine, a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music, who remained here for a number of years. Under his teaching, the conservatory course, intended "to supply superior advantages for pursuing the study of music in all its branches," proved a decided success. In 1887 a second teacher was secured. Pupils' recitals were given once a month, and the Whitman Choral Society was organized. The departments were extended to include, beside piano and voice, pipe organ and violin. The enrollment increased steadily, and the students advanced in proficiency.

Description: Description: !09-10 Conservatory Evolution,1

In 1897 a separate conservatory building became necessary, and the residence of Mrs. James Lasater on South Third Street was leased for that purpose. Four years later, in 1901, Memorial Hall was built. Then the Department of Music was given the old college building, now Pearsons Academy, where it remained until the end of last year.

Description: Description: !09-10 Conservatory Evolution,2

 

On February 17th of this year the latest stage in its development was reached, when the new Conservatory building was formally dedicated. This building is the first of the proposed. Greater Whitman. Built especially to fulfill the needs of the Music Department, and standing on the very site of the first little Seminary building, it stands as a proof of the valuable work done by the Conservatory, and of its high position in the college curriculum.

 

Description: Description: !09-10 Conservatory, Pio

 

World News

·        1909

A. “The Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II was ousted by a unanimous vote of both houses of the Turkish Parliament.” *

B. “Revolution broke out in Persia when the Shah, Muhammad Ali, sought to destroy the constitutional monarchy that he himself had created.” * 

      C. “A Korean nationalist assassinated Japanese Prince Hirobumi Ito on October 26th.” *

      D. “U.S. intervenes in Nicaragua.” *

E. “A civil war broke out in Honduras between President General Miguel Davila and former President Bonilla.” *

      F. “The first newsreel was shown in a Paris theater by Charles Pathe.” *

      G. “On July 25th, Louis Bleriot became the first person to fly across the English Channel.” *

            H. “The decision to send Spanish troops to Morocco precipitated widespread chaos in Spain.” *

 

Team News

 

DEBATE

 

Debate has played an important part in the affairs of man from the time we lost, by a unanimous decision, our first co-ed debate under the historic apple tree in the Garden of Eden. Our record however has not been one of continual defeat, for we have beaten W. S. C. six years straight, laid off a couple of years, and then started back over the same program. We have, in part, taken away the sting of our ancient defeat by wresting victory from Idaho, Pacific and the University of Oregon as well.

There are two systems of debate in vogue at a co-ed school—the formal, and the informal. Informal debating has by far the greater number of devotees, though there are those who still cling to the antiquated formal method.

 

Informal debates at Whitman are supposed to be regulated by the College Librarian and the Dean of Women.

 

Formal-debating is in charge of a committee, composed of three undergraduate wearers of the honor "W," two members, not undergraduates, chosen by the student members, and a Secretary chosen by the entire committee, who acts as manager of Debate and Oratory.

 

This body is known as the Debate Council. All matters pertaining to debate and oratory are placed in its hands by the Associated Students. It makes all contracts with other institutions, selects questions for debate, arranges for oratorical contests, and provides for the finances of the department. The success of the activity depends upon the efficiency and faithfulness of the Council and Manager to a very great degree.

 

Toast to Phrenokosmian

 

ONCE upon a time, ages and ages ago, before Adam and Eve were driven out of Paradise, a little blue violet grew in the Garden of Eden. It was a shy, modest flower, and seldom spoke to those around it content to think its own silent thoughts. On account of its timidity and reserve, the other flowers were wont to jeer and laugh at the little violet One day the Maker came down from Heaven to walk in the garden. The tall holly-hocks, the bold sunflowers, the gaudy poppies, all craned their necks to look at the stranger, for they did not know Him. The tiger-lilies whispered noisily to the roses as He passed. Only the little violet, half hidden among its green leaves, bowed its head and did Him silent reverence.

 

Then the Maker spoke low to the violet: "When I planted the flowers in this garden," he said, "I charged them to remember me, that some day I should come again to walk in the garden, and on that day only those who had remained faithful should know me and share in my love. All the rest have forgotten. Only thou hast remembered. For thy great constancy I bless thee. As long as the world endures, wherever a blue violet is found, shall it be recognized as the symbol of faithfulness." Then the little violet drooped its head still lower, and whispered its words of gratitude. Phrenokosmians and Philolithians, I toast the blue violet; may it bloom ever more abundantly in our lives.

Ruth de Pledge, 13

 

Description: Description: 09-10 Debate Record (Couldn't scan)

Description: Description: 09-10 Phrenokosmian officers, enrolled

 

 

* Taken from: http://www.multied.com/dates/1908.html