1906-1907 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

Description: Description: 1906-07-faculty 2

Description: Description: 1906-07-faculty 3

 

Debate coaches included former Yale debater Mr. Rice, Prof. A. W. Hendrich, and Prof. W. A. Bratton.

 

Description: Description: 06-07 Athenaeum-Libethream Team

Description: Description: 06-07 Debate Council

 

Whitman News

I.                 Whitman College in 1906-1907

A.     W. Gaius Greenslade was the president of ASWC, Lilian C. Merrell was the vice president, and Thomas Dutchar was the secretary.

B.     Greenslade was also the president of the debate council.

C.    Debate coaches included former Yale debater Mr. Rice, Prof. A. W. Hendrich, and Prof. W. A. Bratton.

D.    The school commemorated the Whitman massacre 60 years after the event with a memorial service at the mission during which two massacre survivors spoke.

World News

A. “On May 6th, Czar Nicholas of Russia announces the implementation of the Fundamental Laws.” *

      B. “Finland becomes the first country in Europe to give its women the right to vote.” *

C. Indian Muslims create the All India League to improve Indian/English relationship and to counter growing Hindu strength.

D. “When the Natal legislature imposed a poll tax of one English pound on all residents of Natal, a revolt erupted.” *

      E. “The most disastrous earthquake in America's history hit San Francisco on April 18th.”*

      F. “On June 30th, both the Pure Food & Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act were passed.” *

      G. France and Spain gain control of Morocco.

H. “After a revolt broke out in Cuba, the Cuban leader, Tomas Estrada Palama asked the United States to intervene.” *       

I. “August von Wasserman, a German bacteriologist, developed a test to diagnose syphilis.” *

      J. “The longest railroad tunnel in the world, the Simplon, was opened under the Alps.” *

Description: Description: 1906-07-10th annual contest

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-annual intersociety debates

 

Description: Description: 06-07 Eighth Annual Debate

Description: Description: 06-07 First Annual Debate

 

Speech in the English Department News

 

1906

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH Professor Hendrick, Miss Joliffe, Miss James, Miss Rue The objects contemplated by this department are to impart (a) some knowledge of the origin and development of our language and literature; (b) a general acquaintance with the whole field of litera­ture; (c) a particular acquaintance with the leading periods, with the aim, in the latter case, of imparting an appreciation and understanding of the individual works selected, a grasp of their relation to one an­other, and a conception of the way in which they give expression to the personality of the writer and the tendencies of the time; (d) an acquaintance with good usage in speech and an ability to write and express thoughts in good English. Courses 1, 5, and 7 are required of all candi­dates for baccalaureate degrees. Students who select English as their major study will take Courses 1, 5, 7, 8 or 9; 10, or 11 or 12; 14 or 15 and Course 4 in the Department of Greek.

1. Composition. Lectures, recitations, and written exer­cises. Short themes are written in class and longer ones are required fortnightly. The themes are criticized in detail by the instructors, consultation hours being appointed, and each student required to dis­cuss his work with his instructor. Baldwin, A College Manual of Rhetoric. Open to all students. Three hours per week throughout the year. Required of all Freshmen.

2. Composition. A study of words, the sentence, and the paragraph; a study of the various, kinds of com­position—exposition, criticism, description, argument, narration. Exercises are assigned dealing with the different forms of writing discussed. A limited amount of illustrative reading is required. Two hours per week throughout the year. Open to all students who have completed Course 1 with a grade not lower than “C.”

4. Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments. oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews. Baker, Principles of Argumentation. Two hours per week throughout the year. Open to students who have completed Course 5 and Course 1 with a grade not lower than “C” and Course 1 in the Department of Philosophy.

5. Public Speaking. A general course in vocal training, the use of the voice in speaking and reading, the elements of interpretative reading, with practice in the prepara­tion and delivery of declamations and short speeches. One hour per week throughout the year. Open to all students.

6. Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speech, with the analysis of master-orations and prac­tice in the preparation and delivery of speeches. One hour per week throughout the year. Open to all students who have completed Course 5.

 

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee clubs, debate, literary societies, and student publications are under its control. Any student or instructor of the institution is eligible to membership. THE ATHENAEUM AND PURENOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important work of debate and public speaking.

 

1907

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH Professors HENDRICK and COLEMAN The objects contemplated by this department are as follows: I.     In the study of literature (a) to impart some knowledge of the origin and development of our language and literature; (b) to give a general acquaintance with the whole field of literature; (c) to give a particular acquaintance with the leading periods, with the aim, in the latter case, of imparting an appreciation and understanding of ~he individual works selected, a grasp of their relation to one another, and a con­ception of the way in which they give expression to the per­sonality of the writer and the tendencies of the time. II. In the study and practice of composition (a) to give, with a knowledge of the main principles of rhetoric, much practice and careful training in written expression; (b) to develop the power of free and effective public speech. Courses x, x, and 7 are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Course i must be taken by Freshmen. Students who select English as their major study will take also Courses 8

1.         Composition. Lectures, recitations, and written exercises. Three short themes are written each week; or at the will of the instructor, two or more of these may be replaced by one longer composition. The themes are criticized in detail by the instructor. Conferences are held weekly or hi-weekly, according to the needs of the indi­vidual student. Illustrative reading in the main forms of literary composition is required. Three hours, both semesters. (M. W. F., at 8:oo) Open to all students. Required of all Freshmen.

2.         Advanced Composition. A further course in practical composi­tion fur students who desire special training in addition to that afforded by Course s. Short daily themes or a longer weekly com­position are written throughout the year. A student is encouraged to develop his aptitudes with a view to possible literary work in after life. Each student’s work is subject to the criticism of the class as well as to that of the instructor. Regular conferences are held. Two hours, both semesters. Open to students who have completed Course with a grade not lower than “C.”

3.         Public Speaking. A general course in vocal training, the use of the voice in speaking and reading, the elements of interpretative read­ing, with practice in the preparation and delivery of declamations and short speeches. One hour, both semesters. (F., at 8:oo) Open to all students. Required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees.

6.         Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speech, with the analysis of master-orations and practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches. Two hours, first semester. (T. Th., at 3:00) Open to students who have completed Course 3.

4.         Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews. - Baker, Principles of Argumentation. Two hours, second semester. (F. Tb., at 3:00) Open to students who have completed Courses 5 and 6.

 

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an - organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee clubs, debate, literary societies, and student publications are under its control. Any student or instructor of the institution is eligible to membership. THE ATHENAEUM and PHRENOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important-work of debate and pub­lic speaking.

            THE LIBETHREAN and PHILOLITHIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES have been organized by the young women of the college for the development of literary culture and social life. GLEE CLUBS are maintained by both young men and young women.

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-honors

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-intercollegiate contest

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-libethrean 2

Description: Description: 1906-07-libethrean literary society

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-local oratorical contest

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-oratory

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-phrenokosmian

Description: Description: 1906-07-phrenokosmian 2

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-athenaeum 3

 

World News

II.               In the World

A.     France and Japan instituted open door policies in China.

B.     The Hague Peace Conference was held.

C.    Theodore Roosevelt barred Japanese immigration into the U.S.

D.    U.S. Congress raised their own salaries to $7,500

E.     Finland is 1st European country to give women the right to vote

F.     U.S. invades Honduras

G.    Bubonic Plague breaks out in San Francisco

H.    World's 1st air force established in the U.S. Army

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-debate

 

Team News

 

The Debate Council

ROY N. WOLFE, '07

President

W. GAIUS GREENSLADE, '07  WALTER C. EELLS, '08

PROF. W. A. BRATTON   PROF. A, W. HENDRICK

GEORGE B. WOODWARD, '08, Secretary and Manager Debate and Oratory

The Debate Council is composed of three student members who have represented Whitman in intercollegiate Debate or Oratory, and two members from the faculty. It has charge of all matter, pertaining to local or intercollegiate debates or oratorical contests.

 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ORATOR CHOSEN

 

ORATORICAL CONTEST HELD FRIDAY EVENING IN THE CHAPEL

 

Walter C. Eells Wins First Place on Composition and Delivery and Will Go to Corvallis.

 

Whitman's intercollegiate orator was chosen in the local oratorical contest Friday night, the choice falling on Walter C. Eells. There were three other contestants, Paul P. Brainard, George B. Marquis and W. G. Greenslade.

 

Pioneer 12/18/1906

 

PHRENOKOSMIAN WINS VICTORY

 

DEBATING PRIZE FOR BEST INDIVIDUAL DEBATER WON BY WOLFE.

 

Decision Unanimous for Negative--Teams Chosen to Meet Pacific University and W.S.C.

 

The intersociety debate, on of the greatest local events of the College year, occurred Friday evening and resulted in a decisive victory for the team which was chosen from the contestants of the Philolithian and Phrenokosmian societies. Not only did they win a unanimous decision of the judges, but they also secured four out of six places on the two teams selected, and last, but not least, the coveted prize for the best debater was awarded to one of their number, Roy N. Wolfe.

 

Pioneer 3/12/1907

 

AGAIN WHITMAN IS VICTORIOUS

 

DEFEATS PACIFIC UNIVERSITY IN THIRD ANNUAL DEBATE

 

"Resolved, That Municipalities Should Own and Operate Their Street Railways," Was the Question.

 

Whitman defeated Pacific University Wednesday night in the third annual debate between the two institutions, upholding the affirmative of the question, "Resolved, That Municipalities should own and operate their street railways." Whitman's team consisted of Roy N. Wolfe, C. Alfred Livengood and W. Gaius Greenslade; Pacific's of John W. Peters, Alton C. Allen and James R. Ward. Wolfe and Peters made the rebuttal speeches on their respective sides.

 

TWICE DEFEATED ON OREGON TRIP

 

ORATORS AND DEBATERS YIELDTO W. S. C. AND WILLAMETTE.

 

Miss Forn Healey Wins at Corvallis--Interesting Debate on Fifteenth Amendment.

 

Two defeats were meted out to the Whitman speakers who took the trip into Oregon last week; oneat Corvallis Friday night, when the Pullman orator won the oratorical contest, and one at Salem Wednesday night, when Whitman lost to Willamette University the debate on the fifteenth amendment.

 

PULLMAN TEAM WINS DEBATE

 

LONG RECORD OF DEFEATS AT LAST BROKEN BY W. S. C.

 

Helm, Davenport and Morrow Defeated at Pullman on Negative of Municipal Ownership.

 

For the first time within the memory of present day Whitmanites, and for only the second time in all the debating relations between the two institutions, Whitman was defeated by W. S. C. in debate last Wednesday night at Pullman.

 

Wearers of the "W"

 

DEBATE   ORATORY

 

(Awarded to all students who have represented Whitman in an intercollegiate debate or oratorical contest.)

 

Debate

 

Harold Ellis, '07  Carl Helm, '07

Gains Greenslade, '07  Roy Wolfe, '07

Harry Davenport, '08 Edward Mason, '08

Walter Eells, '08  Roy Peringer, '08

Alfred Livengood, '08  George Woodward, '08

Clarence Morrow, '10

 

Oratory

Calvin Thomason, '07

Walter Eells, '08

 

Description: Description: 06-07 Phrenokosmian Team

Description: Description: 06-07 Third Annual Debate

 

 

Team Results

 

III.              Debate at Whitman

A.     Athenaeum won the intersociety debates.

B.     Intercollegiate debates

1.     Whitman vs. Pacific University, March 6

a.     The topic was “Resolved: That municipalities should own and operate their street railways.”

b.     On the affirmative for Whitman were Roy N. Wolfe who delivered the rebuttal, C. Alfred Livengood, and Greenslade.

c.      On the negative for Pacific were John W. Peters who delivered the rebuttal, Alton C. Allen, and James R. Ward.

d.     Whitman won on a 3-0 decision. The win was Whitman’s third against Pacific in as many years.

2.     Whitman vs. Washington State College, March 20

a.     The topic was “Resolved: That municipalities in the U. S. of over 75, 000 should own and operate their street railways.”

b.     On the affirmative for W. S. C. were Harold Davis, Harry Goldsworthy, and Jesse Akin who delivered the rebuttal.

c.      On the negative for Whitman were Carl G. Helm who delivered the rebuttal, Clarence E. Morrow, and Harry T. Davenport.

d.     The decision was a 2-1 win for W. S. C.

3.     Whitman vs. Willamette, April 24

a.     The topic was “Resolved: That the passage of the 15th Amendment has not been justified.”

b.     On the affirmative for Willamette were Hugh L. Parcel, John E. Reichen, and Walter C. Winslow who delivered the rebuttal.

c.      On the negative for Whitman were George B. Woodward, Davenport who delivered the rebuttal, and Edward F. Mason.

d.     Willamette won on a 3-0 decision.

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-roosevelt chair

Description: Description: 1906-07-whitman-ID debates

 

Description: Description: 1906-07-Whitman-WSC Debates

 

 

* Taken from: http://www.multied.com/dates/1906.html