1905-1906 Whitman Speech and Debate Team

 

Faculty

A.     Rev. Austin Rice coached the debate team, helped by Prof. Lyman, Hendrick, and Bratton.

B.     The debating societies focus on campus debates but also provide training leading students to compete in  intercollegiate contests.

 

 

Whitman News

 

Speech in the English Department News

1905

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH Professor Hendrick and Miss Jolliffe. The objects contemplated by this department are to impart (a) sonic know]edge of the origin and development of our language and literature; (b) a general ac­quaintance with the whole field of literature; (c) a par­ticular acquaintance with the leading periods, with the aim, in the latter case, of imparting an appreciation and understanding of the individual works selected, a grasp of their relation to one another, and a conception of the way in which they give expression to the personality of the writer and the tendencies of the time; (d) an acquaintance with good usage in speech and an ability to write and express thoughts in good English. Courses 1 and 7 are required of all candidates for the baccalaureate degrees. Courses 1, 7, 9, ii or 12, 13, and course 4 in the department of Greek tire required of all students who take English as their major study.

1. Composition. Lectures, recitations, and written exer­cises. Short themes are written in class and longer ones are required fortnightly. The themes are criticized in detail by the instructors, consultation hours being appointed, and each student required to discuss his work with his instructor. Baldwin, A College Manual of Rhetoric. Four hours per week throughout the year. Open to all students. Required of all Freshmen.

2. [Composition. A study of words, the sentence, and the paragraph; lectures on the various kinds of compo­sition—exposition, criticism, description, argument, narration. Exercises are assigned dealing with the different forms of writing discussed. A limited amount of illustrative reading is required. Two hours per week throughout the year. Open to students who have completed Course 1. Omitted in 1905-6.]

4. Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments, oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews. Baker, Principles of Argumentation. Two hours per week either semester. Open to students who have completed Course 5 in the department of Public Speaking.

 

            DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING        I President Penrose and Miss Merrell

5. Principles of Vocal Expression. A general course in vocal training, the use of the voice in speaking and reading, the elements of interpretative reading, with practice in the preparation and delivery of declama­tions and short speeches. One hour per week throughout the year. Open to all students.

6. Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speech, with the analysis of master-orations and prac­tice in the preparation and delivery of speeches. One hour per week throughout the year. Open to students who have completed Course 5.

 

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE 15 ·an organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee-clubs, debate, literary societies, and college publications are under its control. Any student or instructor of the institution is eligible to membership. THE ATHEANEUM AND PHRENOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important work of debate and public speaking. The COLLEGE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION is a society whose aim is to develop power and taste in public speak­ing. It is a charter member of the Intercollegiate Oratorical Association, including the University of Idaho, Washington Agricultural College and School of Science, and Whitman College. The first contest of this associa­tion took place in Walla Walla, May 25, 1897. THE INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATING ASSOCIATION was formed in 1898, including the University of Idaho, the Washington Agricultural College and School of Science, and Whitman College. Two debates are held each year under the Yale-Harvard debating rules.

 

1906

 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH Professor Hendrick, Miss Joliffe, Miss James, Miss Rue The objects contemplated by this department are to impart (a) some knowledge of the origin and development of our language and literature; (b) a general acquaintance with the whole field of litera­ture; (c) a particular acquaintance with the leading periods, with the aim, in the latter case, of imparting an appreciation and understanding of the individual works selected, a grasp of their relation to one an­other, and a conception of the way in which they give expression to the personality of the writer and the tendencies of the time; (d) an acquaintance with good usage in speech and an ability to write and express thoughts in good English. Courses 1, 5, and 7 are required of all candi­dates for baccalaureate degrees. Students who select English as their major study will take Courses 1, 5, 7, 8 or 9; 10, or 11 or 12; 14 or 15 and Course 4 in the Department of Greek.

1. Composition. Lectures, recitations, and written exer­cises. Short themes are written in class and longer ones are required fortnightly. The themes are criticized in detail by the instructors, consultation hours being appointed, and each student required to dis­cuss his work with his instructor. Baldwin, A College Manual of Rhetoric. Open to all students. Three hours per week throughout the year. Required of all Freshmen.

2. Composition. A study of words, the sentence, and the paragraph; a study of the various, kinds of com­position—exposition, criticism, description, argument, narration. Exercises are assigned dealing with the different forms of writing discussed. A limited amount of illustrative reading is required. Two hours per week throughout the year. Open to all students who have completed Course 1 with a grade not lower than “C.”

4. Argumentation. A study of the processes of argument by analysis and construction; writing of arguments. oral debates, individual criticisms, and interviews. Baker, Principles of Argumentation. Two hours per week throughout the year. Open to students who have completed Course 5 and Course 1 with a grade not lower than “C” and Course 1 in the Department of Philosophy. 5.     Public Speaking. A general course in vocal training, the use of the voice in speaking and reading, the elements of interpretative reading, with practice in the prepara­tion and delivery of declamations and short speeches. One hour per week throughout the year. Open to all students.

6. Public Speaking. A study of the chief forms of public speech, with the analysis of master-orations and prac­tice in the preparation and delivery of speeches. One hour per week throughout the year. Open to all students who have completed Course 5.

 

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF WHITMAN COLLEGE is an organization which has charge of the general activities of the student body. Athletics of all kinds, the glee clubs, debate, literary societies, and student publications are under its control. Any student or instructor of the institution is eligible to membership. THE ATHENAEUM AND PHRENOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETIES, meeting weekly, furnish opportunity to the young men for profitable practice in the important work of debate and public speaking.

 

World News

·        “An Englishman, William Fletcher, discovers a connection between elements in food, such as unpolished rice, and the prevention of disease, such as beriberi.”

·        “The Russian Revolution of 1905 begins on “Bloody Sunday” when troops fire onto a defenseless group of demonstrators in St. Petersburg. Strikes and riots follow.”

·        “’Sinn Fein’ was organized as an Irish nationalist party.”

·        Japan takes power over Korea's postal, telegraph and telephone services and power over Korea's foreign affairs, its military matters and police.”

·        Albert Einstein published the “special theory of relativity”

·        Norway's Parliament, the Storting, voted to declare the dissolution of the Union with Sweden. A plebiscite was held and the Norwegian people approved the dissolution. The Swedes went along with the decision. Haakon VII became the new King of Norway.”

·        “The Japanese completely defeated the Russian Navy in the Battle of the Straits of Tsushima.”

·        “President Roosevelt acted as the mediator in peace talks between the Russians and the Japanese to conclude their war, which Japan had won. President Roosevelt was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. US mediation was another sign of emerging US power in the world.”

 

Team News

 

Pioneer 2/6/1906

 

"Pullman Debate"

The Abolition of Football will be the Question Discussed.

 

Tryout Will Be by Brief System--Held a Week From Saturday

 

The Debate Council at a meeting last week fixed the time for the tryout for the team to meet Washington State College at Saturday, February 17.

 

The tryout will be by the brief system. Each candidate must submit a complete brief on either side of the question and may speak on any phase of the question for twelve minutes. A member of any literary society in the institution is eligible to compete for a position on this team.

 

 

Pioneer 4/3/1906

 

WHITMAN AGAIN VICTORIOUS OVER PULLMAN

 

Eighth Annual Intercollegiate Debate Between Whitman and Washington State College Results in Another Victory for Whitman.

 

"Resolved, That Intercollegiate Football in the United States Should Be Abolished," Was the Question Discussed. Whitman Upheld the Affirmative and Pullman the Negative--An Exciting and Spectacular Contest Before a Large Audience--Both Teams Presented Strong Arguments--Decision Two to One for Affirmative

 

            Another Victory in debate! Yes, we won from Pullman Friday night!

 

Team Results

 

I.                 Whitman College in 1905-1906

C.    New instructors included Mr. Schofield in music, Mr. Jackson as an instructor of voice, Miss Burr in domestic sciences, Mr. Mitchell as a gymnasium instructor, Mr. Todd in the Greek department, and Mr. Coleman in English.

D.    Senior class officers were President Charles D. Robinson, vice president Leora Worthington, and secretary-treasurer Linnie M. Marsh.

E.     Rev. Austin Rice coached the debate team, helped by Prof. Lyman, Hendrick, and Bratton.

F.     The first track meet at Whitman was held on Ankeny Field.

G.    The first volume of the Waiilatpu was published.

H.    The students voted on and passed a new constitution.

II.               Debate at Whitman

A.     Whitman won 13 of its 17 intercollegiate debates, including a 4-4 record against top competitor the University of Idaho, and a 6-0 record against Washington State.

B.     At the prestigious University of Oregon tournament, Whitman defeated Pacific University.

C.    Debaters included Worthington, Schutt, Proctor, Olsen, Chittenden, Rupp, Galloway, Cox, Ringer, Palmer, and Baldwin.

D.    A debate was scheduled between Whitman and the University of Idaho to break the 4-4 tie, but Idaho’s administration building burned down and the debate was cancelled.

E.     Phrenokosmian won the intersociety debates.