Sarah H. Davies

(PhD, University of Texas 2012; Assistant Professor) Ancient Mediterranean

Office: Maxey 230
Office hours (fall 2015): on sabbatical
Phone: x5137
E-mail: daviessh@whitman.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Education

Ph.D., 2012, University of Texas at Austin
M.A., 2005, University of Texas at Austin
B.A., 2003, Middlebury College


Teaching & Research Areas

  • Ancient Mediterranean: history of the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome
  • International relations, imperialism, and historiography in the ancient world
  • Cultural and political interactions in the Hellenistic period
  • Rise of Rome as an interstate power, from 3rd to 1st centuries BCE
  • Carthage and the Punic Wars; Roman North Africa

Courses, 2015-6

Fall 2015

(on sabbatical)

Spring 2016

  • (HIST-180) Cities & Empires: Introduction to the Ancient Near East & Mediterranean
  • (HIST-227) Ancient Mediterranean: Rome
  • (HIST-330) Hail Caesar? The Roman Revolution

Past Courses

100-level

  • (HIST-180) Cities and Empires: Introduction to the Ancient Near East & Mediterranean
  • (GENS-145, 146) Encounters: The First-Year Experience, I & II

200-level

  • (HIST-226) Ancient Mediterranean: Greece
  • (HIST-227) Ancient Mediterranean: Rome

300-level

  • (HIST-320) Alexander the Great & the Hellenistic World

Special Topics

  • (HIST-215) Special Topics in Ancient History: Who Owns Antiquity?
  • (HIST-315) Special Topics in Ancient History: Carthage and Rome


Recent Publications

2014

"Beginnings and Endings: 146 BCE as an Imperial Moment, from Polybius to Sallust." in R. Rita Marchese and F. Tutrone (eds.). Evil, Progress, and Fall: Moral Readings of Time and Cultural Development in Roman Literature. EPEKEINA vol. 4, n. 1-2, pp. 177-218. (http://www.ricercafilosofica.it/epekeina/index.php/epekeina/article/view/95)

2013

"Carthage, Corinth, and 146 BCE: Shifting Paradigms of Roman Imperium." Ancient Borderlands International Graduate Student Conference (2010), Beyond Borders: Ancient Societies and their Conceptual Frontiers. University of California, Santa Barbara, California. (http://escholarship.org/uc/ancient_borderlands_rfg_2010)

2011

"An Augustan Period Altar at Carthage: Freedman Status and Roman Provincial Identity." in S. Morton and D. Butler (eds.). It's Good to Be King - The Archaeology of Power & Authority. 41st (2008) Annual Chacmool Archaeological Conference, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Calgary: Chacmool Archaeological Association, The Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, pp. 213-224.