Student Research and Internships

Research for the required Senior Thesis can take many forms. Some students work with Whitman faculty on or off campus, often during the summer after their junior year. Others find qualifying projects while studying abroad during their junior year. Many students conduct research over the summer on or off campus through INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, or SCHOLARSHIPs. [Note: the terms "Fellowship" and "Scholarship" refer to intellectually-engaging research programs and usually fit our major research requirement readily; however, "Internship" refers to pre-career training, and so must include original research with intellectual engagement of the intern in order for it to qualify for our requirement.]

Examples:

  1. The National Science Foundation REU fellowships/internships program.
  2. Internmatch, the largest internship searching company in Washington State (covers all fields, not just sciences). These internships do not automatically fit our research requirement, but often they do.
  3. Whitman's Louis B. Perry Research Scholarship: designed for a faculty-student team doing collaborative summer research.
  4. The Summer Whitman Internship Grant (WIG) provides funding for students to participate in unpaid summer internship experiences to which they have already been accepted. Internships must be relevant to the applicant's educational goals and career interests; these do not automatically fit our research requirement, but often they do.

Examples of student research projects and publications:

Examples of Whitman student presentations at (inter)national meetings (*=undergraduates):

in Brest
Oct. 2001: 3 Whitman students present their work at the 2nd Internat'l Hydrothermal Vent Symposium, Brest, FRANCEPublished: Fiess* J, Hudson* HA, Hom* JR, Kato C, and Yancey PH (2002). Phosphodiester amine, taurine and derivatives, and other osmolytes in vesicomyid bivalves from cold seeps: correlations with depth and symbiont metabolism. Cahiers de Biologie Marine 43: 337-340)
 
Submersible Alvin
Oct. 2006: Ray Andrell spends 6 weeks at sea on the Atlantis, diving in the Alvinsub to collect specimens for his thesis
  • Fiess* J, Hudson* HA, Hom* JR, Kato C, and Yancey PH (2001). Phosphodiester amine, taurine and derivatives, and other osmolytes in vesicomyid bivalves from cold seeps: correlations with depth and symbiont metabolism. 2nd International Hydrothermal Vent Symposium, Brest, France. See photo at right.
  • Anderson* TM, Hutchison D, and Vernon DM (2004). A possible role for RNA-mediated gene duplication in the evolution of a huge plant superfamily. American Society of Plant Biology, Orlando, FL, July 2004 [invited minisymposium talk and poster presentation]
  • Day* NF, Talbot* E, Dobson HEM, Wallace CS, Withers GS (2005). Separating experience-expectant organization from experience-expectant plasticity in the mushroom bodies of the solitary bee Osmia lignaria. Undergraduate Poster Session, Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, Washington DC, Nov. 11- 1
  • Laxson*, C, Condon N, Drazen J, and Yancey PH (2010). Increasing TMAO:urea ratios with depth in Chondricthyes: a physiological depth limit. 12th Internat'l Deep-Sea Biology Symp., Reykjavik, Iceland
  • Aegerter* ER, Stoehr* KR, Bhatt* EM, Knigh LS and Knight TA (2010). Microstimulation and anterograde tracer determination of cortical and collicular projections to the oculomotor brainstem of the mouse. Society for Neuroscience abstract 676.6

Examples of Whitman student publications (*=undergraduates)

  • Cushing, D.A.*, Forsthoefel, N.R., Gestaut, D.R.*, & Vernon, D.M. (2005). Arabidopsis emb 175 and other ppr knockout mutants reveal essential roles for PPR proteins in plant embryogenesis. Planta, 221: 424-436.
  • Rosenberg*, N.K., R.W. Lee, P.H. Yancey (2006). High contents of hypotaurine and thiotaurine in hydrothermal-vent gastropods without thiotrophic endosymbionts. J. Exp. Zool. 305A: 655-662.
  • Brand*, G.L., R.V. Horak*, N. LeBris, S.K. Goffredi, S.L. Carney, B. Govenar, P.H. Yancey (2007). Hypotaurine and thiotaurine as indicators of sulfide exposure in bivalves and vestimentiferans from hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. Mar. Ecol. 28: 208-218.
  • Samerotte*, A.L., J.C. Drazen, G.L. Brand*, B.A. Seibel, P.H. Yancey (2007). Contents of trimethylamine oxide correlate with depth within as well as among species of teleost fish: an analysis of causation. Phys. Zool. Biochem. 80: 197-208
  • Withers, G.S., Day*, N.F., Talbot*, E., Dobson, H.E.M., Wallace, C.S. (2008) Experience-dependent plasticity in the mushroom bodies of the solitary bee Osmia lignaria (Megachilidae). Developmental Neurobiology, October 2007 epub.
  • Knox*, A. and K. Jackson (2010). Ecological and phylogenetic influences on maxillary dentition in snakes. Phyllomedusa 9: 121-131.
  • Moore*, K. and K. Jackson (2010). A quantitative analysis of two scale characters in snakes. Amphibia-Reptilia 31: 175-182.
  • Moyer*, K. and K. Jackson (2011). Phylogenetic relationships among the Stiletto Snakes (genus Atractaspis) based on external morphology. African J. Herpetol. 2011: 1-17.
  • Laxson*, C., N. Condon, J. Drazen, P.H. Yancey. Increasing TMAO:urea ratios with depth in Chondricthyes: a physiological depth limit? Phys. Zool. Biochem. 84:494-505.